0
Canada:Our
      Stories
         Chris Dittmann
chris.d@calgaryscienceschool.com
       Calgary Science School
Background
Background Continued
Background Continued
We want all students to understand that all history is
wr it ten from a particular perspective and po...
Historical Fiction Project
Historical Fiction Project
      Why Historical
      Fiction?
Historical Fiction Project
                   Why Historical
                   Fiction?
Students are invited to use their...
Historical Fiction Project
                   Why Historical
                   Fiction?
Students are invited to use their...
Historical Fiction Project
                   Why Historical
                   Fiction?
Students are invited to use their...
Novels
Novels
White Jade Tiger - Julie Lawson
Factory Girl - Barbara Greenwood
Sister to the Wolf - Maxine Trottier
Across Frozen...
Novels
White Jade Tiger - Julie Lawson
Factory Girl - Barbara Greenwood
Sister to the Wolf - Maxine Trottier
Across Frozen...
Example of Novel Sections
Example of Novel Sections
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore

                Jot Notes
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore

                     Jot Notes
Students ...
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore

                     Jot Notes
Students ...
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore

                     Jot Notes
Students ...
Class Exemplar:
   Raven’s End By Ben Gadd
Common Piece of Literature to Explore

                     Jot Notes
Students ...
Jot Notes - Continued
Jot Notes - Continued
  What is “Jot Note Worthy”?
Jot Notes - Continued
         What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:
Jot Notes - Continued
         What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:

 •
 Descri...
Jot Notes - Continued
         What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:

 •
 Descri...
Jot Notes - Continued
          What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:

 •
 Descr...
Jot Notes - Continued
            What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:

 •
   D...
Jot Notes - Continued
          What is “Jot Note Worthy”?

Categories of Information That Make Good Jot
Notes:

 •
 Descr...
Journal Responses
Journal Responses
Journal Responses -
    Continued
Journal Responses -
      Continued
How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
             Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that yo...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
            Continued
      How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:

1.
 Choose a jot note that you...
Journal Responses -
    Continued
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                     Continued
2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

•
 he pa...
Journal Responses -
                      Continued
 2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

 •
 he...
Journal Responses -
                      Continued
 2.
 So, a good journal response should include the following:

 •
 he...
Geography:
“Mapping The Story”
Geography:
          “Mapping The Story”

Track the the
events from the
novel: vegetation,
climate,
topography etc. to
con...
Geography:
          “Mapping The Story”

Track the the
events from the
novel: vegetation,
climate,
topography etc. to
con...
Group Discussion
Group Discussion
Group Blog Examples
Group Blog Examples
Group Blog - Continued
Group Blog - Continued
Sketches
Sketches
You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant
event, person setting or idea from your novel. ...
Sketches
You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant
event, person setting or idea from your novel. ...
Sketches
You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant
event, person setting or idea from your novel. ...
Sketches
You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant
event, person setting or idea from your novel. ...
Sketch Example
Blog Site
Blog Site
http://sites.google.com/site/
Blog Site
http://sites.google.com/site/
        Group Concept Map
Blog Site
http://sites.google.com/site/
        Group Concept Map
Rubric Building
Using Common Literature: Raven’s End by Ben Gadd
Rubric Building
Using Common Literature: Raven’s End by Ben Gadd
Assessment for
Historical Novels
Assessment for
      Historical Novels
1. Jot Notes
2. Group
 Discussion
 Journal
 Response
3. Group Blog
4. Setting Chart...
Assessment for
      Historical Novels
1. Jot Notes
2. Group
 Discussion
 Journal
 Response
3. Group Blog
4. Setting Chart...
iMovie Project
iMovie Project
Students will understand that within every historical event there
are multiple perspectives. Recognizing th...
iMovie Project
Students will understand that within every historical event there
are multiple perspectives. Recognizing th...
iMovie Project
Students will understand that within every historical event there
are multiple perspectives. Recognizing th...
iMovie Project
Students will understand that within every historical event there
are multiple perspectives. Recognizing th...
iMovie Project -
  Continued
iMovie Project -
            Continued
Understanding the factors that contributed to this
marginalization.
iMovie Project -
             Continued
Understanding the factors that contributed to this
marginalization.

All history i...
iMovie Project -
             Continued
Understanding the factors that contributed to this
marginalization.

All history i...
iMovie Project -
             Continued
Understanding the factors that contributed to this
marginalization.

All history i...
iMovie Project -
  Continued
iMovie Project -
           Continued
Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making
program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR ...
iMovie Project -
           Continued
Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making
program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR ...
iMovie Project -
           Continued
Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making
program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR ...
iMovie Topics
iMovie Topics
1.
   The Coureurs de Bois
2.
   The Filles du Roi
3.
   The Red River Rebellion
4.      Head Tax
5.      Pe...
iMovie Topics
                                    9.
 Residential Schools and
1.
   The Coureurs de Bois
                 ...
iMovie Topic Example
iMovie Topic Example
Research Process
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session ...
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session ...
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session ...
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session ...
Research Process
Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session ...
What Makes A
Meaningful Question?
What Makes A
         Meaningful Question?
Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research
questions. i.e. le...
What Makes A
         Meaningful Question?
Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research
questions. i.e. le...
What Makes A
         Meaningful Question?
Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research
questions. i.e. le...
What Makes A
         Meaningful Question?
Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research
questions. i.e. le...
What Makes A
         Meaningful Question?
Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research
questions. i.e. le...
Concept Map
Concept Map
What’s Important? - Visual Representation
Connections - Who/What is Connected & How?
Feedback Loop - On Track?
Concept Map
What’s Important? - Visual Representation
Connections - Who/What is Connected & How?
Feedback Loop - On Track?...
Concept Map
What’s Important? - Visual Representation
Connections - Who/What is Connected & How?
Feedback Loop - On Track?...
Concept Map Exemplar
The Script
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
1. Show Exemplars
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
1. Show Exemplars
2. Create Rubric
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
1. Show Exemplars
2. Create Rubric
3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
1. Show Exemplars
2. Create Rubric
3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements
4...
The Script
Introduction (Feedback Loop
Process):
1. Show Exemplars
2. Create Rubric
3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements
4...
The Script:
Rubric Example
The Script:
Rubric Example
The “Voice”
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
The “Voice”
View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/
minutes/) and have students focus on different key...
Voice
Recordings
Info Sheet
Voice
Recordings
Info Sheet
Rubric Building
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building of the
Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions
Rubric (whole class):
• Assessment of the audio nar...
Rubric Building
Rubric Building
Rehearse & Record
Rehearse & Record
Rehearse speaking parts and record voice narration:
Give groups time to rehearse their performances.
Con...
Rehearse & Record
Rehearse speaking parts and record voice narration:
Give groups time to rehearse their performances.
Con...
What Makes A
 Powerful
  Image?
What Makes A
 Powerful
  Image?
Complete the TC2 critical
thinking activity -
examining images:
(http://
www.learnalberta....
What Makes A
 Powerful
  Image?
Complete the TC2 critical
thinking activity -
examining images:
(http://
www.learnalberta....
Final Touches
• Titles &   Final Touches
Transitions
• Music & Sound
Effects
• Final Editing
• Titles &   Final Touches
Transitions
• Music & Sound
Effects
• Final Editing
Resources
Resources
http://
calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com
Resources
http://
calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com
http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how-
to-design-better...
Resources
http://
calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com
http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how-
to-design-better...
Resources
http://
calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com
http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how-
to-design-better...
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  • Transcript of "Canada Our Stories Conference Presentation"

    1. 1. Canada:Our Stories Chris Dittmann chris.d@calgaryscienceschool.com Calgary Science School
    2. 2. Background
    3. 3. Background Continued
    4. 4. Background Continued We want all students to understand that all history is wr it ten from a particular perspective and point of view. How we interpret the past and reveal the details of the st ory depends on where we a re standing and whose sh oes we are standing in. General ly history is written f rom the perspective of dominant cultures. Why are the voices of minori ty groups and individuals outsid e of mainstream culture so hard to discover? What might their account of events sound like? How might it be different from accounts i n the history books?
    5. 5. Historical Fiction Project
    6. 6. Historical Fiction Project Why Historical Fiction?
    7. 7. Historical Fiction Project Why Historical Fiction? Students are invited to use their creative imaginations to become the person in the novel they are reading about.
    8. 8. Historical Fiction Project Why Historical Fiction? Students are invited to use their creative imaginations to become the person in the novel they are reading about. How might that person tell the story? How do things look from their perspective? How can you use your voice, music and sound to convey meaning in more richly textured and compelling ways?
    9. 9. Historical Fiction Project Why Historical Fiction? Students are invited to use their creative imaginations to become the person in the novel they are reading about. How might that person tell the story? How do things look from their perspective? How can you use your voice, music and sound to convey meaning in more richly textured and compelling ways? This is an opportunity for you to travel back in time and tell us your version of the truth. What really happened? What is the untold story?
    10. 10. Novels
    11. 11. Novels White Jade Tiger - Julie Lawson Factory Girl - Barbara Greenwood Sister to the Wolf - Maxine Trottier Across Frozen Seas - John Wilson Into the Sun - Luanne Armstrong Underground to Canada - Barbara Smucker Dear Canada Series – Alone in an Untamed Land: The Filles du Roi Diary of Helene St. Onge
    12. 12. Novels White Jade Tiger - Julie Lawson Factory Girl - Barbara Greenwood Sister to the Wolf - Maxine Trottier Across Frozen Seas - John Wilson Into the Sun - Luanne Armstrong Underground to Canada - Barbara Smucker Dear Canada Series – Alone in an Untamed Land: The Filles du Roi Diary of Helene St. Onge Student Choice - Based on Interest Groups of 3 - 5 Students 10 Sections
    13. 13. Example of Novel Sections
    14. 14. Example of Novel Sections
    15. 15. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore
    16. 16. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore Jot Notes
    17. 17. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore Jot Notes Students practice writing jot notes on a sticky
    18. 18. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore Jot Notes Students practice writing jot notes on a sticky Take up what constitutes a great sticky response and what would be a poor example
    19. 19. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore Jot Notes Students practice writing jot notes on a sticky Take up what constitutes a great sticky response and what would be a poor example Create a list of prompts or questions or ideas that you could consider in creating your sticky note ie. shows something about character, setting, connections to other characters or events, insightful question etc.
    20. 20. Class Exemplar: Raven’s End By Ben Gadd Common Piece of Literature to Explore Jot Notes Students practice writing jot notes on a sticky Take up what constitutes a great sticky response and what would be a poor example Create a list of prompts or questions or ideas that you could consider in creating your sticky note ie. shows something about character, setting, connections to other characters or events, insightful question etc. Post this list on chart paper so students can refer to it ongoing throughout the novel study.
    21. 21. Jot Notes - Continued
    22. 22. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”?
    23. 23. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes:
    24. 24. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes: • Describing New Characters
    25. 25. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes: • Describing New Characters • Describing Character Development
    26. 26. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes: • Describing New Characters • Describing Character Development • Describing a new setting that impacts the story
    27. 27. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes: • Describing New Characters • Describing Character Development • Describing a new setting that impacts the story • A Problem facing characters
    28. 28. Jot Notes - Continued What is “Jot Note Worthy”? Categories of Information That Make Good Jot Notes: • Describing New Characters • Describing Character Development • Describing a new setting that impacts the story • A Problem facing characters • Foreshadowing: Something that gives a clue to what might happen later
    29. 29. Journal Responses
    30. 30. Journal Responses
    31. 31. Journal Responses - Continued
    32. 32. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response:
    33. 33. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel…
    34. 34. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story
    35. 35. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?)
    36. 36. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?) c. Led you to wonder about something (ie What will happen next?)
    37. 37. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?) c. Led you to wonder about something (ie What will happen next?) d. Reminded you of a situation or someone in your life or happening in the world. Ask yourself:
    38. 38. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?) c. Led you to wonder about something (ie What will happen next?) d. Reminded you of a situation or someone in your life or happening in the world. Ask yourself: i. Does the event or character remind of something that has happened or is happening in your life?
    39. 39. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?) c. Led you to wonder about something (ie What will happen next?) d. Reminded you of a situation or someone in your life or happening in the world. Ask yourself: i. Does the event or character remind of something that has happened or is happening in your life? ii. Does the character remind of you someone you know or have read about or seen on TV?
    40. 40. Journal Responses - Continued How to Create An Awesome Journal Response: 1. Choose a jot note that you feel… a. Really impacted the story b. Led you to ask questions about it (ie How did this happen? Why did this happen?) c. Led you to wonder about something (ie What will happen next?) d. Reminded you of a situation or someone in your life or happening in the world. Ask yourself: i. Does the event or character remind of something that has happened or is happening in your life? ii. Does the character remind of you someone you know or have read about or seen on TV? iii. Does the situation remind of you of something that’s happening in your community or the larger world?
    41. 41. Journal Responses - Continued
    42. 42. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following:
    43. 43. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T
    44. 44. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I
    45. 45. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions)
    46. 46. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions) • uestions are important and relevant Q
    47. 47. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions) • uestions are important and relevant Q • uestions will generate meaningful discussion in a group Q
    48. 48. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions) • uestions are important and relevant Q • uestions will generate meaningful discussion in a group Q • riter makes connections between what’s happened in the W story and what’s going in the “real world”
    49. 49. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions) • uestions are important and relevant Q • uestions will generate meaningful discussion in a group Q • riter makes connections between what’s happened in the W story and what’s going in the “real world” Remember, the journal response is your feelings about the event or character. ***It is not rewriting your jot note.***
    50. 50. Journal Responses - Continued 2. So, a good journal response should include the following: • he page in the book the jot note came from T • mportant/significant information from the jot note I • redictions about what might happen next (often through P questions) • uestions are important and relevant Q • uestions will generate meaningful discussion in a group Q • riter makes connections between what’s happened in the W story and what’s going in the “real world” Remember, the journal response is your feelings about the event or character. ***It is not rewriting your jot note.*** A journal response is taking the jot note description and describing your own thoughts, feelings, questions and observations.
    51. 51. Geography: “Mapping The Story”
    52. 52. Geography: “Mapping The Story” Track the the events from the novel: vegetation, climate, topography etc. to convey the impact of setting on events in the novel.
    53. 53. Geography: “Mapping The Story” Track the the events from the novel: vegetation, climate, topography etc. to convey the impact of setting on events in the novel.
    54. 54. Group Discussion
    55. 55. Group Discussion
    56. 56. Group Blog Examples
    57. 57. Group Blog Examples
    58. 58. Group Blog - Continued
    59. 59. Group Blog - Continued
    60. 60. Sketches
    61. 61. Sketches You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant event, person setting or idea from your novel. Your sketch needs to demonstrate planning and care to attention and detail. Think back to our excerpt of Raven's End. What would you sketch? Why?
    62. 62. Sketches You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant event, person setting or idea from your novel. Your sketch needs to demonstrate planning and care to attention and detail. Think back to our excerpt of Raven's End. What would you sketch? Why? Artistic style - use of white space, use of colour, Clear vision of what they are going to create from the novel.
    63. 63. Sketches You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant event, person setting or idea from your novel. Your sketch needs to demonstrate planning and care to attention and detail. Think back to our excerpt of Raven's End. What would you sketch? Why? Artistic style - use of white space, use of colour, Clear vision of what they are going to create from the novel. Bring in an artist to illustrate effective sketches vs. ineffective sketches
    64. 64. Sketches You are invited to create a visual representation of a significant event, person setting or idea from your novel. Your sketch needs to demonstrate planning and care to attention and detail. Think back to our excerpt of Raven's End. What would you sketch? Why? Artistic style - use of white space, use of colour, Clear vision of what they are going to create from the novel. Bring in an artist to illustrate effective sketches vs. ineffective sketches Accurate and reasonable representation of events in novel.
    65. 65. Sketch Example
    66. 66. Blog Site
    67. 67. Blog Site http://sites.google.com/site/
    68. 68. Blog Site http://sites.google.com/site/ Group Concept Map
    69. 69. Blog Site http://sites.google.com/site/ Group Concept Map
    70. 70. Rubric Building Using Common Literature: Raven’s End by Ben Gadd
    71. 71. Rubric Building Using Common Literature: Raven’s End by Ben Gadd
    72. 72. Assessment for Historical Novels
    73. 73. Assessment for Historical Novels 1. Jot Notes 2. Group Discussion Journal Response 3. Group Blog 4. Setting Chart 5. Sketches 6. Concept Map
    74. 74. Assessment for Historical Novels 1. Jot Notes 2. Group Discussion Journal Response 3. Group Blog 4. Setting Chart 5. Sketches 6. Concept Map
    75. 75. iMovie Project
    76. 76. iMovie Project Students will understand that within every historical event there are multiple perspectives. Recognizing that history is the weaving in of different multiple perspectives.
    77. 77. iMovie Project Students will understand that within every historical event there are multiple perspectives. Recognizing that history is the weaving in of different multiple perspectives. Students will be able to create and tell a compelling story that surfaces an important understanding about Canadian history.
    78. 78. iMovie Project Students will understand that within every historical event there are multiple perspectives. Recognizing that history is the weaving in of different multiple perspectives. Students will be able to create and tell a compelling story that surfaces an important understanding about Canadian history. Students will use voice to communicate a character's thoughts, feelings and perspectives about their role in relation to key historical events.
    79. 79. iMovie Project Students will understand that within every historical event there are multiple perspectives. Recognizing that history is the weaving in of different multiple perspectives. Students will be able to create and tell a compelling story that surfaces an important understanding about Canadian history. Students will use voice to communicate a character's thoughts, feelings and perspectives about their role in relation to key historical events. Traditionally some perspectives have been valued more than others. Recognizing that some perspectives were marginalized and their voices not heard.
    80. 80. iMovie Project - Continued
    81. 81. iMovie Project - Continued Understanding the factors that contributed to this marginalization.
    82. 82. iMovie Project - Continued Understanding the factors that contributed to this marginalization. All history is storied and therefore is constantly unfolding and reshaping our understanding of past events.
    83. 83. iMovie Project - Continued Understanding the factors that contributed to this marginalization. All history is storied and therefore is constantly unfolding and reshaping our understanding of past events. All history must be interpreted....how do our values shape our interpretations. What constitutes credible evidence?
    84. 84. iMovie Project - Continued Understanding the factors that contributed to this marginalization. All history is storied and therefore is constantly unfolding and reshaping our understanding of past events. All history must be interpreted....how do our values shape our interpretations. What constitutes credible evidence? Develop student visual literacy - communicating effectively with images.
    85. 85. iMovie Project - Continued
    86. 86. iMovie Project - Continued Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR drama production
    87. 87. iMovie Project - Continued Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR drama production Creating A Common Understanding Through Exemplars: Grade 7 Exemplars, Canadian Historical Minutes
    88. 88. iMovie Project - Continued Technical Requirements: Access to a movie-making program. ie. iMovie, MovieMaker OR drama production Creating A Common Understanding Through Exemplars: Grade 7 Exemplars, Canadian Historical Minutes Choice of Topics: Directly from Social Studies Curriculum 16 Topics in Total
    89. 89. iMovie Topics
    90. 90. iMovie Topics 1. The Coureurs de Bois 2. The Filles du Roi 3. The Red River Rebellion 4. Head Tax 5. Persons Act 6. The Great Depression 7. The United Empire Loyalists 8. Irish Immigration to Canada
    91. 91. iMovie Topics 9. Residential Schools and 1. The Coureurs de Bois Language 2. The Filles du Roi 10. Residential Schools 3. The Red River Rebellion 11. Treaties – Blackfoot Crossing 4. Head Tax 12. Underground to Canada: 5. Persons Act 13. Franklin Expedition 6. The Great Depression 14. Child Labour 7. The United Empire Loyalists 15. Creation of Nunavut 8. Irish Immigration to Canada 16. Oka
    92. 92. iMovie Topic Example
    93. 93. iMovie Topic Example
    94. 94. Research Process
    95. 95. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian
    96. 96. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session to determine criteria for:
    97. 97. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session to determine criteria for: - Good sources of research information for each topic
    98. 98. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session to determine criteria for: - Good sources of research information for each topic - Characteristics of high quality research (reliable sources, relevant etc.)
    99. 99. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session to determine criteria for: - Good sources of research information for each topic - Characteristics of high quality research (reliable sources, relevant etc.) - Use the characteristics as criteria for the "research" rubric you create with your kids or to generate a "Tips for doing Good Research" list that is posted in the classroom
    100. 100. Research Process Research Mini Lesson by Teacher Librarian Teacher/Librarian to lead the class in a brainstorming session to determine criteria for: - Good sources of research information for each topic - Characteristics of high quality research (reliable sources, relevant etc.) - Use the characteristics as criteria for the "research" rubric you create with your kids or to generate a "Tips for doing Good Research" list that is posted in the classroom Students Log Research Activity - Bibliography
    101. 101. What Makes A Meaningful Question?
    102. 102. What Makes A Meaningful Question? Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research questions. i.e. level 1 are simple factual recall questions level 2 are opinion questions and level 3 are questions that require reasoned judgment.
    103. 103. What Makes A Meaningful Question? Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research questions. i.e. level 1 are simple factual recall questions level 2 are opinion questions and level 3 are questions that require reasoned judgment. Have students work with their groups to develop all 3 levels of questions.
    104. 104. What Makes A Meaningful Question? Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research questions. i.e. level 1 are simple factual recall questions level 2 are opinion questions and level 3 are questions that require reasoned judgment. Have students work with their groups to develop all 3 levels of questions. Have groups present a few of their questions to the rest of the class for feedback. (i.e. do they have good level 3 questions, are they all related to the topic, do they reflect the perspectives being represented etc.)
    105. 105. What Makes A Meaningful Question? Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research questions. i.e. level 1 are simple factual recall questions level 2 are opinion questions and level 3 are questions that require reasoned judgment. Have students work with their groups to develop all 3 levels of questions. Have groups present a few of their questions to the rest of the class for feedback. (i.e. do they have good level 3 questions, are they all related to the topic, do they reflect the perspectives being represented etc.) Help students receive and give constructive feedback to one another.
    106. 106. What Makes A Meaningful Question? Discuss and provide examples of different levels of research questions. i.e. level 1 are simple factual recall questions level 2 are opinion questions and level 3 are questions that require reasoned judgment. Have students work with their groups to develop all 3 levels of questions. Have groups present a few of their questions to the rest of the class for feedback. (i.e. do they have good level 3 questions, are they all related to the topic, do they reflect the perspectives being represented etc.) Help students receive and give constructive feedback to one another. A great resource for developing powerful questions can be found here: http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/ssmt/html askingpowerfulquestions_mt.html
    107. 107. Concept Map
    108. 108. Concept Map What’s Important? - Visual Representation Connections - Who/What is Connected & How? Feedback Loop - On Track?
    109. 109. Concept Map What’s Important? - Visual Representation Connections - Who/What is Connected & How? Feedback Loop - On Track? Use the Concept Map for Script Outline & Present to Small Groups:
    110. 110. Concept Map What’s Important? - Visual Representation Connections - Who/What is Connected & How? Feedback Loop - On Track? Use the Concept Map for Script Outline & Present to What makes a great ‘story’? Small Groups: What’s going to make this interesting and compelling? Suspense, sense of character…(conversation with the whole class) What true historical details will be woven into the story? What problem will the character(s) be faced with? How will they resolve it? What important idea about Canada does this story help to tell? etc.
    111. 111. Concept Map Exemplar
    112. 112. The Script
    113. 113. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process):
    114. 114. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process): 1. Show Exemplars
    115. 115. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process): 1. Show Exemplars 2. Create Rubric
    116. 116. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process): 1. Show Exemplars 2. Create Rubric 3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements
    117. 117. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process): 1. Show Exemplars 2. Create Rubric 3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements 4. Peer-Assessment/Make Improvements
    118. 118. The Script Introduction (Feedback Loop Process): 1. Show Exemplars 2. Create Rubric 3. Self-Assessment/Make Improvements 4. Peer-Assessment/Make Improvements Same Feedback Loop Process for Body & Conclusion of Script
    119. 119. The Script: Rubric Example
    120. 120. The Script: Rubric Example
    121. 121. The “Voice”
    122. 122. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective.
    123. 123. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script?
    124. 124. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective?
    125. 125. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour?
    126. 126. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective
    127. 127. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective - What were the characters doing?
    128. 128. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective - What were the characters doing? - What did characters say? What made them believable?
    129. 129. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective - What were the characters doing? - What did characters say? What made them believable? - What historical details were added to this story? Why were they important? etc.
    130. 130. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective - What were the characters doing? - What did characters say? What made them believable? - What historical details were added to this story? Why were they important? etc. As students are listening to the exemplar, they should complete the document "Historical Minutes Note Sheet."
    131. 131. The “Voice” View a number of Historical Minutes (http://www.histori.ca/ minutes/) and have students focus on different key elements to determine what makes them effective. - What makes a good script? - Why was the introduction effective? - What was the point of highest tension or conflict or humour? - How did the story end? Was this effective - What were the characters doing? - What did characters say? What made them believable? - What historical details were added to this story? Why were they important? etc. As students are listening to the exemplar, they should complete the document "Historical Minutes Note Sheet." Use these ideas to develop criteria for what makes a great story
    132. 132. Voice Recordings Info Sheet
    133. 133. Voice Recordings Info Sheet
    134. 134. Rubric Building
    135. 135. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class):
    136. 136. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations.
    137. 137. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc.
    138. 138. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid.
    139. 139. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid. • Areas to emphasize:
    140. 140. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid. • Areas to emphasize: -- speak clearly; enunciate
    141. 141. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid. • Areas to emphasize: -- speak clearly; enunciate -- expression
    142. 142. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid. • Areas to emphasize: -- speak clearly; enunciate -- expression -- appropriate volume and pacing
    143. 143. Rubric Building of the Create Assessment Criteria for Audio Dimensions Rubric (whole class): • Assessment of the audio narration (again consider using exemplars to help kids pick out the characteristics of excellent voice narrations. • Also find or create exemplars illustrating the features of a really bad performance....Provide exemplars of what really bad looks like (this is an opportunity to incorporate all of those mistakes into the script/narration that you want students to avoid i.e. mispronouncing words, lack of expression, confusing sequence, mumbling etc. • Establish assessment criteria with the students. Use the exemplars to help students discover what they should be striving for as well as which common mistakes they should try to avoid. • Areas to emphasize: -- speak clearly; enunciate -- expression -- appropriate volume and pacing -- music and sound effects that enhance ideas
    144. 144. Rubric Building
    145. 145. Rubric Building
    146. 146. Rehearse & Record
    147. 147. Rehearse & Record Rehearse speaking parts and record voice narration: Give groups time to rehearse their performances. Consider having them partner with another group to obtain suggestions for improvement (using the rubric as a guide).
    148. 148. Rehearse & Record Rehearse speaking parts and record voice narration: Give groups time to rehearse their performances. Consider having them partner with another group to obtain suggestions for improvement (using the rubric as a guide). Self-Reflection: Students prepare a written self assessment of their audio performance based on the rubric and provide specific evidence in support of their assessment.
    149. 149. What Makes A Powerful Image?
    150. 150. What Makes A Powerful Image? Complete the TC2 critical thinking activity - examining images: (http:// www.learnalberta.ca/ content/ssmt/html/ interpretingandreinterpret ingvisualimages_mt.html)
    151. 151. What Makes A Powerful Image? Complete the TC2 critical thinking activity - examining images: (http:// www.learnalberta.ca/ content/ssmt/html/ interpretingandreinterpret ingvisualimages_mt.html)
    152. 152. Final Touches
    153. 153. • Titles & Final Touches Transitions • Music & Sound Effects • Final Editing
    154. 154. • Titles & Final Touches Transitions • Music & Sound Effects • Final Editing
    155. 155. Resources
    156. 156. Resources http:// calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com
    157. 157. Resources http:// calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how- to-design-better-historical-digital.html
    158. 158. Resources http:// calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how- to-design-better-historical-digital.html Intelligence Online (IO)Project Website for Canada Our Stories: Analyzing Historical Fiction http://www.iostudent.com/4321
    159. 159. Resources http:// calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com http://calgaryscienceschool.blogspot.com/2009/09/how- to-design-better-historical-digital.html Intelligence Online (IO)Project Website for Canada Our Stories: Analyzing Historical Fiction http://www.iostudent.com/4321 Intelligence Online (IO)Project Website for Canada Our Stories: Historical Digital Stories: http://www.iostudent.com/3655
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