Developing Online Materials that Acknowledge the Science of Learning in Moodle

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These are slides to support Jason Neiffer's Presentation, "Developing Online Materials that Acknowledge the Science of Learning in Moodle," presented at the 2013 MountainMoot in Helena, MT.

These are slides to support Jason Neiffer's Presentation, "Developing Online Materials that Acknowledge the Science of Learning in Moodle," presented at the 2013 MountainMoot in Helena, MT.

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  • 1. Developing Online Materials that Acknowledge the Science of Learning in Moodle Jason Neiffer, M.Sci., ABD Doctoral candidate, The University of Montana Curriculum Director, Montana Digital Academy
  • 2. Paperless handouts workshophandouts.com/moodlescience
  • 3. CONTEXT: Why the science of learning?
  • 4. Thought  Leaders,  LLC  
  • 5. Allan  
  • 6. BrewBooks  
  • 7. MYTHS
  • 8. Students learn less (or more) in online environments
  • 9. Good? BAD? D.  Clark  (2012)  
  • 10. Online learning/digital learning is more motivating than more átraditional environmentsà
  • 11. Good? BAD? D.  Clark  (2012)  
  • 12. Digital learning is better in tune to a studentäs álearning styleà
  • 13. • Willingham  (2010)   Research  FoundaDon  is  Weak   • Gardiner  (2006)  (≠  disavow,  but…)   ReconsideraDon  from  Advocates   • R.  C.  Clark  and  Mayer  (2008)   Student  Self-­‐Awareness  is  Low  
  • 14. Digital learning is more effective for ádigital nativesà
  • 15. • Fryer  (2011)   NaDve  ≠  Literate   • McKenzie  (2007)   Claims  are  “Thinly  Supported”   • Walsh  (2011)   • Willingham  (2010)   MulDtasking  Claims  are  False  
  • 16. Games and simulations are more engaging and effective
  • 17. Extra  Ketchup  
  • 18. Yes! Yes!No! No! No! D.  Clark  (2012)  
  • 19. I have this amazing toolbox, I must use it!
  • 20. Laffy4K  
  • 21. Fact: Teachers must make purposeful learning decisions, no matter the environment.
  • 22. THREE SIMPLE concepts to IMPROVE COURSE DESIGN IN MOODLE
  • 23. 1.) BE mindful A STUDENTäS COGNITIVE LOAD
  • 24. Cognitive load theory
  • 25. RetroArt  
  • 26. • Sweller,  Ayres,  and  Kalyuga  (2011)   Brain  has  limited  capacity  (3-­‐4  items)   Exceeding  the  brain’s  capacity  leads  to  distracDon   InstrucDonal  environment  must  be  purposeful  
  • 27. Eliminate  Unnecessary  DistracDons  from  Moodle  
  • 28. Eliminate  Unnecessary  DistracDons  from  Moodle   Simple,  clean  text   Minimum  use  of  clipart  and  non-­‐content  images   Choose  one  or  two  typefaces/styles  per  page   Resource:  Non-­‐Designer’s  Design  Book  (Williams)   Resource:  PresentaDon  Zen  (Reynolds)  
  • 29. Eliminate  Unnecessary  DistracDons  from  Moodle  
  • 30. Maintain  Course  Consistency  Program  Wide  
  • 31. Maintain  Course  Consistency  Program  Wide  
  • 32. Maintain  Course  Consistency  Program  Wide   Force  system-­‐wide  theme   Use  sDcky  blocks  to  place  consistent  content  in  courses   Avoid  over-­‐designing  course  pages  
  • 33. Lessen  the  Impact  of  the  “Scroll  of  Death”  
  • 34. Lessen  the  Impact  of  the  “Scroll  of  Death”   Don’t  store  content  on  main  page   Close  off  unneeded  weeks  (past  and  future)   Don’t  over-­‐design  the  main  page  
  • 35. 2.) Use Moodleäs tools to design thoughtful content
  • 36. CHUNKING
  • 37. Image:  Malamed  (2013)        
  • 38. Moodle  Book  Module  (from  the  University  of  Montana  Online)  
  • 39. Assignment  Module  (From  Kevin  Cleary,  MTDA)  
  • 40. Assignment  Module  (From  Kevin  Cleary,  MTDA)  
  • 41. USE MOODLE to Provide Corrective Feedback
  • 42. Basic  CorrecDve  Feedback  in  the  “Lesson”  Module  
  • 43. More  Detailed  Feedback  in  the  “Quiz”  Module  
  • 44. 3.) Design Classes that teach, donät just provide resources
  • 45. See-­‐ming  Lee  
  • 46. Completion tracking/ access restriction
  • 47. Access  RestricDon  
  • 48. AcDvity  CompleDon  
  • 49. Teacher  should  craf  order  of  materials/lesson   Student  should  craf  pace   AlternaDves  should  be  remediaDon,  or  for  advanced  students  
  • 50. Additional reading
  • 51. Websites: www.neiffer.com www.techsavvyteacher.com www.montanadigitalacademy.org www.umt.edu Email: Neiffer(at)gmail.com Twitter: techsavvyteach Google Plus: gplus.to/techsavvyteacher