December 2009 PhD Candidate:   Neda Abbasi Emergence of Innovations Contributing to Adolescents’ Identity Formation Within...
Part of a PhD Research with the topic of  “Pathways to a Better Personal and Social Life through Learning Spaces: The Role...
<ul><li>1. Early Forms of Spaces for Education </li></ul><ul><li>2. John Dewey’s Educational Ideas, emergence of Radical a...
The Monitorial System School  Southwark Central School 1. Early Forms of Spaces for education School building with ‘fixed ...
2. John Dewey’s Educational Ideas, Radical and Experimental Educational Philosophies •  Schools as cooperative democratic ...
3. The Modern Movement in Architecture •  One-storey buildings with flat roofs, glass and metal window walls, brick or con...
3. The Modern Movement in Architecture   (Open-air Schools) •  The Movement for improved natural lighting •  The focus on ...
3. The Modern Movement in Architecture   (Henry Morris & village colleges) Impington Village Collage, 1938, designed by Wa...
3. The Modern Movement in Architecture   (Crow Island School & L-shaped classrooms) Crow Island School, 1940, designed by ...
4. Open-space Schools of the 1960s and 1970s •   New beliefs about education as their key drivers      Teaching to learni...
5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design  (Hans Scharoun-1) •  The ‘classroom unit’ as the basic element of the ...
5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design  (Hans Scharoun-1) •  Creating smaller schools or communities within a ...
5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design  (Herman Hertzberger) •  Maintaining visual relations through split-lev...
<ul><li>   Attention to students’ needs, freedom and independence </li></ul><ul><li>   Attempt in broadening the traditi...
<ul><li>Neda Abbasi </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
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Presentation for the workshop in Department of Education and Early Childhood development (DEECD) Victoria-Neda Abbasi- Dec2009)

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This historical review of school design explores the emergence of changes and innovations that contribute, in some ways or other, to adolescents’ identity formation.

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Presentation for the workshop in Department of Education and Early Childhood development (DEECD) Victoria-Neda Abbasi- Dec2009)

  1. 1. December 2009 PhD Candidate: Neda Abbasi Emergence of Innovations Contributing to Adolescents’ Identity Formation Within the Recent History of School Design
  2. 2. Part of a PhD Research with the topic of “Pathways to a Better Personal and Social Life through Learning Spaces: The Role of School Design in Adolescents’ Identity Formation” Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning of the University of Melbourne Supervisors: Assoc. Prof. Greg Missingham and Assoc. Prof. Kenn Fisher
  3. 3. <ul><li>1. Early Forms of Spaces for Education </li></ul><ul><li>2. John Dewey’s Educational Ideas, emergence of Radical and Experimental Educational Philosophies and their influences on School Buildings </li></ul><ul><li>3. The Modern Movement in Architecture </li></ul><ul><li> Open-air Schools </li></ul><ul><li> Henry Morris’s idea of village colleges </li></ul><ul><li> L-shaped/Articulated classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>4. Open-space schools of the 1960s and 1970s </li></ul><ul><li>5. The emergence of a social approach to school design </li></ul><ul><li> Hans Scharoun’s School Designs </li></ul><ul><li> Herman Hertzberger’s School Designs </li></ul>Topics reviewed
  4. 4. The Monitorial System School Southwark Central School 1. Early Forms of Spaces for education School building with ‘fixed function spaces’ • More human scale environment • More flexibility and freedom • Subdividing the typical large hall • Furniture and seating arrangement
  5. 5. 2. John Dewey’s Educational Ideas, Radical and Experimental Educational Philosophies • Schools as cooperative democratic communities • Broadening the traditional learning programmes • Opening schools’ spaces to the world outside • Spaces for hands-on learning Hillside Home School, 1902, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright
  6. 6. 3. The Modern Movement in Architecture • One-storey buildings with flat roofs, glass and metal window walls, brick or concrete walls • No significant change to the internal arrangement of schools and self-contained classrooms Schools designed by Dudok in Hilversum between 1921 and 1930, school building type with classrooms off sides a corridor
  7. 7. 3. The Modern Movement in Architecture (Open-air Schools) • The Movement for improved natural lighting • The focus on hygiene and physical health • The use of glass • Foldable walls Open-air School in Amsterdam, 1930, designed by Duiker Open-air School in Suresnes, Paris,1936
  8. 8. 3. The Modern Movement in Architecture (Henry Morris & village colleges) Impington Village Collage, 1938, designed by Walter Gropius and Max Fry • Provide for the whole man • Abolish the duality of education and ordinary life • The central promenade walkway • The community wing and classrooms wing • The Assembly hall and the courtyard The Community wing The Classrooms wing The Assembly hall The Central Promenade walkway The Courtyard
  9. 9. 3. The Modern Movement in Architecture (Crow Island School & L-shaped classrooms) Crow Island School, 1940, designed by Perkins & Will architects • Recognition of the child's need for physical health, emotional and social adjustment and self-expression • The L-shaped classroom design
  10. 10. 4. Open-space Schools of the 1960s and 1970s • New beliefs about education as their key drivers  Teaching to learning  Passive to active student participation  Lecture and recitation to inquiry and discovery • Proposed outcomes included  Encouraging interactions and greater sense of community  More freedom for teachers and pupils  Flexible programming  Contributing to individualised learning
  11. 11. 5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design (Hans Scharoun-1) • The ‘classroom unit’ as the basic element of the school plan A. Main teaching space B. Annex to allow a variety of uses C. Entrance lobby D. External teaching space Geschwister School Lünen, 1962 A classroom unit
  12. 12. 5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design (Hans Scharoun-1) • Creating smaller schools or communities within a whole school • Turning circulation spaces into meeting places and break halls • An assembly hall or a theatre as a ‘social centre’ of school School at Marl-Drewer in Westpalia, 1971
  13. 13. 5. Emergence of a Social Approach to School Design (Herman Hertzberger) • Maintaining visual relations through split-level design • The central hall as the social hub of school • The transitional space between classrooms and corridors Apollo Schools, Amsterdam, 1980
  14. 14. <ul><li> Attention to students’ needs, freedom and independence </li></ul><ul><li> Attempt in broadening the traditional learning programs </li></ul><ul><li> Attention to the social role of schools </li></ul>Educational Trends Design trends Design responses  The decrease in the formality and rigidity of school buildings  Creating school spaces that were flexible and offered many opportunities  The emergence of a social approach to school design  More relaxed and village-like site plans  Articulated Classrooms  Addition of new spaces  Well-lit spaces and glass walls  Opening up schools to the world outside  Openness of interior spaces  Designing social spaces  Creative design of circulation spaces
  15. 15. <ul><li>Neda Abbasi </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>

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