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Bcg portfolio analysis

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  • 1. Portfolio Analysis BCG Tool for Analyzing Opportunities & Ability to Compete
  • 2. Types of Portfolio Analysis • Growth Share Matrix (Boston Consulting Group) • Industry Attractiveness/Business Position Matrix (General Electric)
  • 3. Growth Share Matrix (Boston Consulting Group) • Classification of SBUs/products into four cell matrix based on – Market Attractiveness • Indicator – Industry’s annual growth rate • 10% traditional cutoff – Business Strength • Indicator – Company’s Market Share Relative to Largest Competitor
  • 4. Market Growth Rate The Boston Consulting Group’s Growth-Share Matrix 20%18%16%14%12%10%8%6%4%2%0 Stars 4 5 Question marks 3 ?? ? 1 2 Dogs Cash cows 8 7 6 10x 4x 2x 1.5x 1x .5x .4x .3x .2x .1x Relative Market Share
  • 5. Star Strategies • Leader expanding industry • Generates large profits • Requires substantial investments to sustain growth • Farthest down on experience curve relative to competition • Increase sales – e.g. new markets, new channels of distribution • Increase market share
  • 6. Problem Child or ? • Low market share in expanding industry • Needs substantial cash to improve its position • Slow progress on experience curve • Increase sales (limit to niche or increase market share (limit to niche) • Leave market
  • 7. Cash Cow • • • • Leader in mature or declining industry Can generate funds for other SBUs Maintain market share e.g. ensure quality, build customer loyalty, develop substitute brands Maximize Cash Flow e.g. increase usage rate, rate of replacement, modify expense structure, raise prices
  • 8. Dogs • Low market share in a mature or declining industry • Slow progress on experience curve • Cost disadvantages and few growth opportunities • Harvest or Divest • Concentrate on niches requiring limited effort
  • 9. Market Growth Rate The Boston Consulting Group’s Growth-Share Matrix 20%18%16%14%12%10%8%6%4%2%0 10x 4x 2x 1.5x 1x .5x .4x .3x .2x .1x Relative Market Share
  • 10. Strategy Implications BCG • Star – Leader in Expanding Industry – BUILD - Continue to increase market share – if necessary at expense of short-term earnings • Problem Child – Low market share in Expanding Industry – HARVEST if weak, BUILD if strong. – Assess chances of dominating segment. If good, go after share. If bad, redefine business or withdraw.
  • 11. Strategy Implications BCG • Cash Cow – Leader in mature or declining industry – HOLD - Maintain share and cost leadership until further investment becomes marginal – Maximize cash flow • Dogs – Low market share in a mature or declining industry – DIVEST Plan an orderly withdrawal so as to maximize cash flow or concentrate on niches that require limited effort
  • 12. Assumptions of Growth /Share Matrix • High market share generates cash revenues ? • High Market growth uses more cash resources ?
  • 13. Issues with Growth/Share Matrix • Market growth is not the only factor related to cash usage. • Market growth is not necessarily related to cash usage. • Market share is not necessarily related cash generation. • Multiple factors lead to profitability. • Cash is not the only factor in evaluating a portfolio.
  • 14. Issues With Growth/Share Matrix • Limited to industries where experience curve is relevant • Appropriate for volume industries • Overlooks perils of growth • Measurement problems • Product-market definition problems • Difficult to implement strategies