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CMT1300 (Re)search skills (October 2010)
 

CMT1300 (Re)search skills (October 2010)

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  • Explain our aims for the workshop: how to find info using the library catalogue how to make sure it is what you need ie. at right level and will answer your info need how to use it effectively including citing and referencing.
  • Talk about website: What does LR do: 2 services (Library and IT/AV) Point out links to: Guides and Helpsheets incl. Referencing and citation guides. Opening hours LibGuides Helpsheets and guides Library catalogue Electronic Resources
  • Explain what Library Subject Guide is. Demonstrate how to get to guide from LR Page and point out Ask-A-Librarian etc.
  • Ask students where they usually find information they require? Discuss.
  • Explain the importance of using lots of different sources of information: shows good use and range of evidence & resources to support your arguments and ideas. A technical standard is an established norm or requirement. It is usually a formal document that establishes uniform engineering or technical criteria, methods, processes and practices. Ie. Currency: books can be out-of-date, journals and conference proceedings can be very up-to-date Quality: journals, books, newspapers and proceedings go through editorial process/refereed. Websites can be produced by anyone. Scope: Journals and proceedings can be very specific in their scope, books can be broader. Level: An academic journal or conference proceedings aimed at a particular audience Reliability: because of editorial/referee process, books, academic jnls and conference proceedings can be relied on for quality and accuracy. Some newspapers and magazines may be sensationalist, although usually careful to be accurate. Quantity: Books provide lots of info, but a well-written journal article on a specific subject can provide sufficient info on a subject. Too much info on the Web. Audience: Academic journals will be aimed at a specific audience, books broader. Newspapers can be bias ie. political, social, gender, geographical, racial etc. Stress importance of evaluating your information sources to ensure it is what you need.
  • Exercise aims to demonstrate the importance of choosing the right type of information/evaluation: How are the journals different? Format eg. length of articles, use of colour/images Abstract, author information and bibliography How would each journal be useful? Keeping up-to-date/news General interest/overview Subject specific/detailed How would you assess each journal for quality? Statement of purpose Editorial board/contributors Author’s credentials/qualifications Further reading/bibliography/evidence of their research Peer reviewed Journal backed by association/organisation
  • Systematic and comprehensive search for information: question or problem that needs answering or resolving Finding information to inform, underpin and shape your research Finding what has already been written on your subject Identifying the main trends: ie. contextualising your research Finding appropriate literature: need to review it ie. read it, understand it, identify gaps etc......
  • On order to gather info need to carry out a literature search. “ I keep six honest serving-men who taught me all I knew. Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who ”. (Rudyard Kipling) What: Consider in order to find right type of info. What type of info...figures, images, theories, case studies etc.. Why: Why you need it will determine the amount and level of info required.....background info (overview), answer a question (specific), new ideas (up-to-date), substantiate a theory (in-depth) etc.. When: Immediately or by a deadline in the future, think how-long it will take to get hold of info. How: Coming up with a search strategy (next slide) Where: Identifying the best resources to use in order to find the information that you require eg. if you need up-to-date information or specialist research, you need to look at journals....therefore need to use a journal index (database) in order to find journals Who : Evaluating the information. Very important. More later.
  • Thinking about the questions that needs to be asked in order to find the information required Outlining the main areas of interest, concepts, questions etc Considering the scope of your subject and setting limits if appropriate Background reading and brainstorming will help you to understand your subject, make connections, and gather keywords (search terms) Consider search terms (alternative, broader, narrower) and related subjects eg. Subject: Interaction design Broader: Design Narrower: User centred interaction design Related: Interface design Alternative: IxD
  • Initial research can provide you with search terms and help you focus in on your subject.
  • You may use any campus library You can access the Library Catalogue from the LR website The Library Catalogue lists all the material (books, journals, videos, dissertations, videos/DVDs etc.) held in all the Middlesex University libraries You can search by subject or by author/title Use the Library catalogue to request books which are on loan or at another campus Can access catalogue from 24/7 and LR website
  • Finding a book on the Catalogue: Demonstrate how to find a book on the catalogue eg. Title A-Z ‘Design through digital interaction’ by Chengzhi Peng Explain the bibliographic record Demo on how to Request a book GKW ‘interaction design’ 118 Sort by date ascending to get most recent first No.2 is a jnl ‘Int Jnl of H-C studies’ No. 6 is a book @Visual thinking for design’ No. 7 is an e-book ‘Interactive shape design’ Important to carefully read each book record to make sure it is what you need. Finding journals on the Library catalogue: A journal may be available in print or electronic format (or both) To check availability, use the library catalogue If available in print form, the catalogue will tell you which campus holds the journal If available online, there will be a blue ‘web access’ link to the available online issues of the journal Demonstrate: Go to Library Catalogue Journal a-z search ‘Interacting with computers’ Search within the journal ‘Smart clothing’ Look at No. 3 ‘A platform for wearable physiological computing’ Next slide looks in more detail at the information that students might get on reading lists.......
  • Any suggestions?
  • By subject in a numerical sequence (Dewey Decimal) therefore books on the same subject will be at the same number Each subject has its own shelf number eg. Interaction design 006.454 Computer graphics 006.6 Books on the same subject will be at the same number, but books on computing science will be all over the library ie. Computing science will be at the beginning of the sequence, business computing in the middle and games design at the end of the sequence After the shelf number there are 3 letters eg. 004.19 PRE ie. First 3 letters of the authors name. This is the suffix. Books arranged alphabetically by suffix eg. 004.19 ABE, 004.19 CR0, 004.19 PRE: These letters help you find books if there are lots on the same subject as books will be arranged alphabetically within the number
  • Explain.
  • Author, date, title of report or article, date, publisher, place, number, available from, date accessed
  • Having explained how students can understand what information they have been given on reading list ask them to find the following items using the library catalogue: Book has several editions. Make sure students find 2007 edition and not 2002. HE, AR, DU, CH 004.019 PRE Chapter in book. HE 004.019 FUN Journal article (article which Paula is using) 3 rd ed. E-Book. Feedback. 15 mins.
  • Always acknowledge someone else’s work: if you refer or quote someone else’s work in your essay, it is essential that you give credit to them by citing where you found the information in your essay. At the end of the essay, you must write a bibliography of all the material you have used ie. referencing It’ is a form of cheating, and a serious academic offence that can result in disciplinary action. The University has sophisticated technology that will catch plagiarised work ie. Tunitin There are lots of different ways to reference and cite such as the Harvard System, Numerical system, MLA system Your school uses the Harvard System: a helpsheet is available on the LR website under ‘Guides and helpsheets’ and ‘Study skills’ or on the Library Subject guide http://bit.ly/EISrefcite PLATO: PLA giarism T aught O nline.....PLATO will help you to learn practical skills in referencing and will show you how to avoid plagiarism - no matter what your subject is or your previous background.  You can practice referencing online and get some onscreen feedback.  Access it through the Learning resources website. Demonstrate how to find PLATO from LR page and quick tour of it.
  • Go to PLATO , have a look at the information it gives you, and carry out the ‘guided exercises’ under ‘How to reference’ Select a topic from ‘Prequel’ CD Write down related, broader, alternative, and more specific terms/keywords Use concept/mind maps to organise your ideas http://bit.ly/mind_mapping Bring your keywords to the next workshop

CMT1300 (Re)search skills (October 2010) CMT1300 (Re)search skills (October 2010) Presentation Transcript

  • (Re)search Skills CMT1300 Part 1 Nazlin Bhimani and Vanessa Hill Learning Resources
  • In this workshop we will cover..
    • Finding information
    • Evaluating information
    • Using information
  • By the end of this session you will be.....
    • Familiar with the Learning Resources Web page and the Library Subject Guides
    • Able to use the Library Catalogue to find books and journals
    • Locate the books and journals on the shelves
    • Request and renew books
    • Log-in to electronic resources
  • Learning Resources Homepage and Library Subject Guides
  • Library Subject Guide http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/eis
  • Where can I find information?
  • Sources of information
    • Books
    • Journals/magazines
    • Newspapers
    • Conference proceedings
    • Websites
    • Standards
    • Reports
    • People
  • Exercise 1
    • You have been given 3 journals. In your group
    • consider the following:
    • How are the journals different from each other?
    • How would each journal be useful?
    • How would you assess each journal for quality?
  • What is a literature search?
    • Systematic and comprehensive search for information
    • Finding information to inform, underpin and shape your research
    • Finding what has already been written on your subject
    • Identifying the main trends
    • Finding appropriate literature
  • Before you start searching for information think about the following....
      • What do I need to find out?
      • Why do I need this information?
      • When do I need the information by?
      • How am I going to find the information?
      • Where am I going to find the information?
      • Who created this information?
  • How am I going to find the information? ie. plan your search strategy
    • It is useful to start your research (literature
    • search) by:
    • Thinking about the questions that needs to be asked
    • Outlining the main areas of interest
    • Considering the scope of your subject
    • Gathering keywords (search terms)
  • HCI Specific Broader Related Alternative User interface design User experience design Design interactions Usability User centred design IxD Social interaction design Instructional design Computing devices Education software Cognitive psychology Mobile phones Interaction Design
  • The Library Catalogue
    • You can access the Library Catalogue from the LR website
    • The Library Catalogue lists all the material held in all the Middlesex University libraries
    • You can search by subject or by author/title
    • Use the Library catalogue to request books which are on loan or at another campus
  • Finding items on the Library Catalogue
  • How are books arranged in the Library?
  • Books are arranged:
    • By subject in a numerical sequence
    • Each subject has its own shelf number
    • eg. Interaction design 006.454
    • Computer graphics 006.6
    • After the shelf number there are 3 letters
    • eg. 004.19 PRE
    • Books arranged alphabetically by suffix
    • eg. 004.19 ABE, 004.19 CR0, 004.19 PRE
  • Books
    • This is an example of a reference for a book:
    • Author Date Title of book
    • PREECE, Jenny. (2007). Interaction design: beyond human-computer interaction.
    • (2 nd edition). John Wiley, Chichester.
    • Edition Publisher and place of publication
  • Journals
    • This is an example of a journal reference :
    • Author Date Title of article
    • KOSHMAN, Sherry. (June 2005). Testing user interaction with prototype visualization based information retrieval system. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 56(8). pp.824-833.
    • Journal Title Volume Part Page Nos.
  • Websites
    • This is an example of a report from a website:
    • Author Title Date
    • Department of Culture, Media and Sport, and Department of business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform. (2009). Digital Britain: the interim report [online]. DCMS and DBERR, London. (Cm 7548). Available from: http://www.culture.gov.uk/images/publicaitons/digital_britain_interimreportjan09.pdf. [Accessed 1 Feb 2009] .
    • Web Address Date Accessed
  • Exercise 1: Use the Library Catalogue to find the following books and journals
    • PREECE, Jenny. (2007). Interaction design: beyond human-computer interaction (2 nd edition). John Wiley, Chichester.
    • WRIGHT, Peter et al. (2003). Making sense of experience. In BLYTHE, Mark A et al. Funology: from usability to enjoyment. Kluwer Academic, London. pp.43-53
    • MORI, G. PATERNO, F. and SANTORO, C. (Aug 2002). CTTE: support for developing and analyzing task models for interactive system design. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. 28(8). pp.797-813.
    • DIX, Alan. (2007). Human-computer interaction (3 rd ed). Prentice-Hall, Harlow.
  • Using information in your work
    • Always acknowledge someone else’s work: citing and referencing
    • There are lots of different ways to reference and cite
    • Your school uses the Harvard System
    • More info: http://bit.ly/EISrefcite
    • PLATO
  • Homework Exercise
    • Go to PLATO , have a look at the information it gives you, and carry out the ‘guided exercises’ under ‘How to reference’
    • Select a topic from ‘Prequel’ CD
    • Write down related, broader, alternative, and more specific terms/keywords
    • Use concept/mind maps to organise your ideas http://bit.ly/mind_mapping
    • Bring your keywords to the next workshop
  • Need further help?
    • Your subject support librarians are :
    • Nazlin Bhimani [email_address]
    • Vanessa Hill [email_address]
    • Your contact in the Learner Development Unit is:
    • Paula Bernaschina [email_address]