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    009   cho-1 009 cho-1 Presentation Transcript

    • e-Agriculture for Improved Livehoods and Food Security! Assessing the Requirements forElectronically Linking Farmers with Markets KHIN MAR CHO & DONALD TOBIAS Cornell University Cooperative Extension New York City IAALD Africa Chapter Conference 21-23 May 2012 Johannesburg, South Africa
    • Assessing the Requirements forElectronically Linking Farmers with MarketsUSAID-MEAS: Action Research Project (Ethiopia, Rwanda, Bangladesh) Background,  Goal  and  Objec3ves     v  The  MEAS  project  is  funded  by  USAID  through  a  collabora=ve  grant  to  the   University  of  Illinois,  Michigan  State  University  and  Cornell  University   v  This   project   is   under   the   auspices   of   Cornell   University   and   based   on   the   successful  implementa=on  of  the  MarketMaker  program     v  Determine  what  marke=ng  and  distribu=ng  issues  could  be  addressed  by   developing  a  SMS  mobile  device  plaDorm  for  farmers,  brokers,  and   agricultural  extension  specialists  in  three  countries   v  Preliminary  assessment  of  farmers’  marke=ng,  distribu=on,  and  produc=on   needs  that  can  be  addressed  by  the  use  of  mobile  phone  device  
    • What’s MarketMaker?  v  MarketMaker  is  a  na=onal  network  of  state  Websites,  currently  available   in  23  states,  connec=ng  producers/farmers  and  processors  with  food   distributors,  retailers,  consumers  and  others  in  the  food  supply  chain.    v  MarketMaker  is  a  comprehensive  interac=ve  database  of  food  industry   marke=ng  and  business  data.  v  It’s  one  of  the  most  extensive  collec=ons  of  searchable  food  industry  data   in  the  United  States  (8000+  producers,  600,000+  food  businesses).  v  A  FREE  web-­‐based  mapping  resource  that  brings  market  intelligence  to   small  and  medium-­‐sized  producers.  v  Helps  farmers  and  other  food  related  enterprises  connect  with  other   members  of  the  food  supply  chain.  v  Helps  consumers  find  healthier,  fresher  and  more  flavorful    locally  grown   food.    v  Educates  users  on  food  marke=ng  and  value-­‐added  agriculture  marke=ng   topics  and  regula=ons.   http://national.marketmaker.uiuc.edu
    • MEAS Project and Stakeholders Ethiopia, Rwanda, Bangladeshv  Successfully   conducted   the   project   in   Ethiopia,   Rwanda,   and   Bangladesh   in   Summer  2011  v  Assisted   by   Agricultural   University,   Ministry   of   Agriculture,   and   NGOs   in   iden=fying  rural  farmers  and  food  related  businesses  groups  for  the  purpose   of   determining   needs   and   desires   related   to   marke=ng   and   distribu=on   of   food  products    v  Conducted   mee=ngs   and   Concept   Mapping   workshops   with   farmers,   middlemen,   representa=ves   from   food   related   businesses,   representa=ves   from  private  Agro  enterprises,  extension  specialists,  and  faculty  members  v  Par=cipants   volunteered   informa=on   regarding   issues   that   would   improve   marke=ng   and   distribu=on   of   products   as   well   as   technology   features   that   would  assist  in  marke=ng  
    • What is Concept Mapping?   A method that...Focuses  and  helps  objec-fy  the  group  planning   process    Helps  individuals  think  as  a  group...   ...without  losing  their  individuality  Helps  groups  to  manage  complexity...   ...without  trivializing  or  losing  detail  
    • Definition of Concept Mapping  “Concept mapping is a structured process, focused on a topic or construct of interest, involving input from multiple participants, that produces an interpretable pictorial view of their ideas and concepts and how these are interrelated. The process is participatory in that it is inherently a mixed methodology that integrates high-quality qualitative and quantitative techniques.” Trochim, 1989
    • In  about  4  hours  of  par=cipant  =me  a  group  can...   ...Brainstorm a large set of issues... •  innovations in way network is delivered •  (investigate) corporate/structural alignment •  assist in the development of non-traditional partnerships (Rehab with the Medicine Community) •  expand investigation and knowledge of PSNS/PSOs •  continue STHCS sponsored forums on public health issues (medicine managed care forum) •  inventory assets of all participating agencies (providers, Venn Diagrams) •  access additional funds for telemedicine expansion •  better utilization of current technological bridge •  continued support by STHCS to member facilities •  expand and encourage utilization of interface programs to strengthen the viability and to improve the health care delivery system (ie teleconference) •  discussion with CCHN
    • brainstorm•  innovations in way network is delivered•  (investigate) corporate/structural alignment•  assist in the development of non-traditional partnerships (Rehab with the Medicine Community)•  expand investigation and knowledge of PSNS/PSOs•  continue STHCS sponsored forums on public health issues (medicine managed care forum)•  inventory assets of all participating agencies (providers, Venn Diagrams)•  access additional funds for telemedicine expansion•  better utilization of current technological bridge•  continued support by STHCS to member facilities•  expand and encourage utilization of interface programs to strengthen the viability and to improve the health care delivery system (ie teleconference)•  discussion with CCHN …”map” the issues... organize sort Decide how to manage multiple tasks. 20 Manage resources effectively. 4 Work quickly and effectively under pressure 49 Organize the work when directions are not specific. 39 Technology Information Services rate Community & Consumer Views Regionalization Management STHCS as model Financing
    • •  better utilization of current technological bridge (8)•  expand and encourage utilization of interface programs to strengthen the viability and to improve the health care delivery system (ie teleconference) (10)•  patient information system to be shared by all members (19)•  the STHCS will assess the status of all participant organization interface technology development and needs (20)•  teleconference board meeting (21)•  development of interface technology (30)•  continued advancement of tech interface (44)•  assure 100% board member access to wide area network (46)•  utilize the televideo telecommunication, telemedicine to share resources/ strengths (50)•  establishment of a virtual network -- as an intranet originally and eventually an internet solution (61) Technology Information Services Community & Consumer Views Regionalization Financing Management STHCS as model
    • brainstorm •  innovations in way network is delivered •  (investigate) corporate/structural alignment •  assist in the development of non-traditional partnerships (Rehab with the Medicine Community) •  expand investigation and knowledge of PSNS/PSOs •  continue STHCS sponsored forums on public health issues (medicine managed care forum) •  inventory assets of all participating agencies (providers, Venn Diagrams) •  access additional funds for telemedicine expansion •  better utilization of current technological bridge •  continued support by STHCS to member facilities •  expand and encourage utilization of interface programs to strengthen the viability and to improve the health care delivery system (ie teleconference) •  discussion with CCHN Information Services organize Technology sort Community & Consumer Views Decide how to manage multiple tasks. 20 Manage resources effectively. 4 Work quickly and effectively under pressure 49 Organize the work when directions are not specific. 39 Regionalization rate map Information Services TechnologyCommunity & Consumer Views Regionalization Financing Management Mission & Ideology Management STHCS as model Financing ...prioritize the issues...
    • brainstorm •  innovations in way network is delivered   •  (investigate) corporate/structural alignment 5 •  assist in the development of non-traditional partnerships (Rehab with the Medicine Community) •  expand investigation and knowledge of PSNS/PSOs •  continue STHCS sponsored forums on public health issues (medicine managed care forum) •  inventory assets of all participating agencies (providers, Venn Diagrams) •  access additional funds for telemedicine expansion •  better utilization of current technological bridge •  continued support by STHCS to member facilities •  expand and encourage utilization of interface programs to strengthen the viability and to improve the health care delivery system (ie teleconference) •  discussion with CCHN organize   Feasibility sort 76   33   Decide how to manage multiple tasks. 20 75     Manage resources effectively. 4 Organize the work Work quickly and effectively under pressure 49 25 34   37     when directions are not specific. 39 2.6 22       10 62   1   17 45   1.8   rate 1.2   2.47   Importance   4.8   map Information Services Technology …and  “drill  back  down”  to  details   for  priori=zing  ac=on  Community & Consumer Views Regionalization prioritize Information Services Technology Community & Consumer Views 4.23 4.4 Management STHCS as model Financing Regionalization 3.55 r = .72 3.56 Financing Management Mission & Ideology
    • Utility for EvaluationConcept  map   Needs   Measurement   Implementa3on   Outcome  features   Assessment   Development   Evalua3on   Evalua3on  Points   Specific  needs   Specific  Ques=ons   Specific  ac=vi=es   Specific  results  Clusters   Categories  of   Measurement   Program   Outcome   need   constructs   components   constructs  Point  ra=ngs   Importance  of   Relevance  of   Expected  or   Expected  or   needs   ques=ons  to   observed   observed  outcomes   construct   implementa=on  of   ac=vi=es  Cluster  ra=ngs   Importance  of   Average  relevance   Expected  or   Expected  or   areas  of  need   of  construct   observed   observed  outcome   implementa=on  of   constructs   components  Go-­‐zones   Target  most   Consistency  on   Target  specific   Match  expected   important  needs   ques=on   ac=vi=es  and   and  observed   relevance   components  to   outcomes   address  
    • Concept Mapping Workshops Ethiopia, Rwanda, BangladeshBrainstorming  Prompt    “I  would  be  much  beSer  able  to  market  and  distribute  my  products  if…”   Responded  Statements   Ethiopia  (85)-­‐50+  par3cipants   Rwanda  (90)-­‐100+  par3cipants   Bangladesh  (90)-­‐100+  par3cipants  
    • Point Map (ETHIOPIA) 26 54 43 85 58 66 79 4 72 84 67 56 40 10 82 61 78 14 77 51 41 9 73 11 7 19 5027 5 643 33 6 42 39 60 18 32 71 53 38 81 83 46 20 22 59 35 21 23 12 37 24 75 57 48 8 29 69 52 28 2 76 45 62 36 30 68 63 70 74 1 65 44 49 34 15 13 47 17 55 25 31 80 16
    • Cluster Labeled Map Mobile Phone & Agriculture Training Agricultural InformationTransportation Market Coordination Increased Production Market Analysis Capital Producer/Market Linkage
    • Point Cluster Rating Map (Imp.) Mobile Phone & Agriculture Training Agricultural Information Transportation Market Coordination Increased Production Market Analysis Capital Producer/Market Linkage
    • Point Cluster Rating Map (Fesb.) Mobile Phone & Agriculture Training Market Information Transportation Market Coordination Increased Production Market Analysis Capital Producer/Market Linkage
    • Point Cluster Rating Map (Ethiopia)Importance   Feasibility  
    • Point Cluster Rating Map (Rwanda)Importance   Feasibility  
    • Point Cluster Rating Map (Bangladesh)Importance   Feasibility  
    • Go-Zone: Mobile Phone & Agriculture (ETH) Mobile Phone & Agriculture r = -.03 3.95 79  4            Mobile  phone  marke=ng  informa=on  technology   84  was  slowly  introduced  into  the  market  place     40 41          I  can  receive  marke=ng  messages  on  my  cellular   10  phone     26 41 3.48 54 4 61 79        Telecommunica=on  industries  encouraged  the   43 77  use  of  mobile  phone  marke=ng  technology     84          Farmers’  use  of  mobile  technology  increased    Feasibility 51 66 14 43          Mobile  phone  usage  costs  were  affordable  for    farmers   51          Mobile  phone  marke=ng  informa=on  was    coordinated  with  exis=ng  marke=ng    informa=on  resources   61          Mobile  phone  messages  were  simple  and  clear         2.59 3.27 3.79 4.59 Importance 66          Literacy  levels  of  mobile  informa=on  were    appropriate   77          Farmers’  had  access  to  mobile  phone  for    marke=ng  informa=on   10          I  can  use  my  mobile  phone  with  simplified  text   14          A  mobile  phone  applica=on  for  marke=ng    messaging  system    informa=on  was  inexpensive/free   26          Mobile  phone  marke=ng  was  introduced  with   54  Mobile  phone  for  farmers  were  affordable    only  one  or  two  popular  commodi=es     40          Mobile  phone  marke=ng  informa=on  was  tested    in  the  areas  around  Addis  Ababa  
    • Go-Zone: Market Analysis (ETH) Market Analysis r = .51 3.95 24 2              I  knew  the  current  prices  of  different   37 2  commodi=es     32 8 20 8              I  knew  the  up-­‐to-­‐date  agricultural  commodi=es   45 28  prices  informa=on     3.48 83 53 20          I  knew  market  informa=on     24          I  know  current  market  price  informa=on     30 12 70 28          I  knew  when/where  products  are  available     39Feasibility 60 23 21 38 32          There  was  improvement  in  exis=ng  sources  of    marke=ng  informa=on     46 30          I  knew  consumers  preferences   38          Daily  price  fluctua=on  informa=on  was  available   2.59  to  everyone   3.27 Importance 4.1 4.59 46          Market  informa=on  was  available  to  farmers    distant  from  urban  centers   53          There  was  more  market  informa=on  organized   12          I  knew  new  marke=ng  channels    by  commodi=es   21          I  had  access  to  business  profiles   60          There  was  marke=ng  informa=on  by  geographic   23          I  had  informa=on  about  smaller  producers    loca=ons   39          Real  =me  market  informa=on  is  accessible  for           70  Farmers  knew  consumers’  preferences      middlemen   83  Access  to  current  informa=on  about  interna=onal   37          I  knew  the  different  market  loca=ons   market  was  available   45          I  knew  the  urban  market  prices    
    • Go-Zone: Mobile Phone Technology (RWD) Mobile Phone Technology r = .53 1              There  was  a  mobile  phone  based  market   4.03  informa=on  system  to  access  to  urban  markets     73 27 1 40 57 75 38 2              Literacy  levels  of  mobile  phone  informa=on   90 14 71  were  appropriate     3.49 85 2 14          Mobile  phones  for  farmers  are  affordable     43 27          There  were  improved  system  for  delivering    important  informa=on  to  farmers    Feasibility 5 31 38          I  had  the  ability  to  recharge  mobile  phone     79 39 71          Farmers  preference  for  local  language  instead  of    French  on  mobile  phone     84 69 73          I  had  a  mobile  phone  with  a  user  friendly  system     75          I  had  mobile  phone  system  that  connected    buyers  and  sellers     2.44 3.47 4.04 4.85 90          There  was  a  mobile  phone  text  message  system   Importance  with  language  easy  to  understand  by  Farmers     5              Farmers  had  geographically  specific  weather  informa=on  using  mobile  phone   43          Mobile  phone  text  messages  were  simple  &   31          I  had  short  and  simple  informa=on  about  best  prac=ces  of  crop  technology  on    clear      my  mobile   39          I  had  access  to  variety  of  mobile  phones   69          There  was  training  for  small  farmers  who  seldom  use  internet  and  mobile   40          I  had  training  for  both  purchasing  and  using    phone   79          There  was  a  web  site  available  to  create  virtual  buyer  and  seller  connec=on    mobile  phone   84          Telecommunica=on  industries  encourage  the  use  of  mobile  phone  marke=ng   57          Mobile  phone  marke=ng  informa=on  was    technology    coordinated  with  the  exis=ng  marke=ng   85          Mobile  phone  marke=ng  was  introduced  ini=ally  with  only  one  or  two  popular    commodi=es      informa=on  resources    
    • Go-Zone: Market Analysis (RWD) Market Analysis r = .69 4.17 35 15          I  knew  the  consumers  preferences     35          There  were  more  market  opportuni=es  for  rural   88 72  farmers     42 74 15 52          I  knew  consumer  preferences  I  can  get  a  higher   3.67 82 61 20 81 8352  price     44 34 55 72          I  knew  current  market  informa=on     74          I  knew  what  surplus  exists  that  can  be  sold   87Feasibility  rather  than  consumed  locally     25 83          There  was  an  opportunity  for  small  scale    farmers  to  par=cipate  in  the  market     88  I  knew  the  different  market  loca=ons       2.7 3.46 4.33 4.67 Importance 81          I  knew  the  current  prices  of  different    commodi=es   87          There  were  reliable  suppliers     20          I  had  beker  interac=on  with  traders  and  dealers   25          I  had  more  informa=on  about  future  market  trends   34          I  had  the  availability  to  do  direct  sale  to  market  to  increase   42          Farmers  knew  market  loca=ons    profits   44          I  could  iden=fy  community  with  enough  money  to  buy   61  I  knew  market  informa=on    products       55          I  knew  how  to  collaborate  to  take  products  to  market:    trucking,  marke=ng,  etc.   82          Local  economy  is  stronger  I  can  get  a  beker  price  
    • Go-Zone: Mobile Phone & Agriculture (BGDH) Mobile Phone & Agriculture r = .83 4.65 21 20 26 20          I  could  use  mobile  phone  to  inform  the  retailer   4.25 76 44 34 24  before  harves=ng  my  product     13 28 21          I  could  use  mobile  phone  to  communicate  to  the   54 33  retailer  before  marke=ng  my  poultry   23 24          I  could  talk  to  different  middlemen/retailers    using  mobile  phone  before  fixing  price  of  my    product    Feasibility 26          I  could  use  mobile  phone  to  know  the  latest    market  price  and  availability  of  seasonal  fruits     34          There  was  a  mobile  phone  system  that  provide    honest  and  accurate  market  informa=on     44          I  had  access  to  internet  based  market    informa=on  system  in  combina=on  with  mobile   1.65 2.53 Importance 4.93 5  phone  system   76  Mobile  phone  marke=ng  technology  was  slowly    introduced  into  the  market  place   13          I  could  receive  more  advice  from  a  veterinary        surgeon  by  using  mobile  phone   23          I  received  fair  price  through  direct  marke=ng  in   28          More  training  and  informa=on  about  ‘mobile    Mymensingh    marke=ng’  and  or  ‘internet  marke=ng’  was   33          There  was  internet  facility  to  know  accurate  market    available      informa=on   54          Government  and  NGO  support  for  SMS  and  mobile   X  x  x  x  x  x  x      device  agricultural  informa=on  system  existed    
    • Go-Zone: Market Analysis (BGDH) Market Analysis r = .8 4.65 22          I  could  sell  my  vegetables  and  rice  in  local   25 8184 75 22  market  directly     4.03 49 65 77 75          I  knew  the  up-­‐to-­‐date  agricultural  commodi=es    price  informa=on     89 42 87 85 40 65          Small  farmers  had  direct  access  to  market     90 77          I  knew  the  current  prices  of  different    commodi=es    Feasibility 84          I  knew  the  different  market  loca=ons     81          Retailers  had  direct  access  to  farmers     25  I  could  buy  fruits  from  different  retailer  market    directly       1.65 2.53 4.84 5 85          Daily  price  fluctua=on  informa=on  was  available   Importance  to  everyone   42          I  had  access  to  the  same  market  informa=on  that   89  There  was  marke=ng  informa=on  by  geographic    big  merchants  have    loca=ons     40          I  had  access  to  more  informa=on  about  market      changes  in  future  direc=on   87          Wholesalers  wishing  to  increase  profits  could   49  Current  market  and  price  informa=on  at  local    contact  farmers      and  district  levels  was  available     90          I  had  more  informa=on  about  expor=ng  my      products    
    • Conclusion MOBILE  TECHNOLOGY   Mobile  Phone  &  Agriculture   MARKET  ANALYSIS  &  ACCESS   Market  Analysis   Market  Coordina8on   Producer/Market  Linkage   CONTEXTUAL  ISSUES   Training  &  Technology   Agricultural  Informa8on   Increased  Produc8on   MB       AMIS Capital   Framer  Awareness   Government  ini8a8ve   Increased  Capacity   Sourcing  Quality  Products   Seed  &  Pes8cide  Regula8ons   Climate  and  Weather   Transporta8on      Mobile  Phone  Based  Agricultural  Market  Informa=on  System  (MBAMIS)    
    • ConclusionThe  results  of  this  study  can  be  examined  from  three  perspec=ves.      u  First,   there   is   a   high   degree   of   similarity   in   the   features   that   farmers   consider   most   desirable.   Issues   of   affordability,   ease   of   use,   language   preferences,  daily  commodity  prices  at  the  market  and  weather  informa=on   are  common  desires.    u  Secondly,  there  are  common  issues  around  the  type  of  market  informa=on   that  farmer’s  desire.  While  most  want  basic  commodity  prices  at  the  market   on   a   daily   basis,   there   are   addi=onal   expecta=ons   around   market   loca=on   informa=on,   ability   to   deal   via   cell   phone   with   brokers   and   retail   representa=ves   as   well   as   informa=on   about   product   quality,   consumer   preferences,  and  contact  informa=on.    u  Lastly,  there  are  contextual  issues;  many  farmers  wanted  to  use  technology   as   a   means   of   organizing   themselves   into   co-­‐ops,   and   influence   policy   in   regard  to  quality  and  price  of  storage,  pes=cides,  seeds  and  equipment.  
    • Brainstorming Session  
    • Focused On Sorting !  
    • Serious About Rating !  
    • Female Graduate Student translates for Women Farmers  
    • Sorting and Rating by Farmers, Traders,Middlemen, Retailers, Wholesalers, Extension Specialists, and Faculty Members  
    • More Information about Concept Mapping? www.conceptsystems.com   Contact:             Donald  Tobias,  Ph.D.  (djt3@cornell.edu)     William  Trochim,  Ph.D.  (wmt1@cornell.edu)   Khin  Mar  Cho,  Ph.D.  (kc458@cornell.edu)         Resources:     •  Kane,  M.  and  Trochim,  W.  (2007).  Concept  mapping  for  planning  and   evalua=on.  Applied  social  research  methods  series.  Volume  50,  SAGE   publica=ons.   •  Trochim,  W.  and  Kane,  M.  (2005).  Concept  mapping:  An  introduc=on  to   structured  conceptualiza=on  in  health  care.  Interna8onal  Journal  for  Quality   in  Health  Care,  17  (3),  June  2005,  187-­‐191.       •  Trochim,  W.  (1989).  An  introduc=on  to  concept  mapping  for  planning  and   evalua=on.  Evalua8on  and  Program  Planning,  12(1),  1-­‐16.  
    • If  you  still  have  questions  or  want  more   Information,  contact:       Khin  Mar  Cho,  Ph.D.   Donald  Tobias,  Ph.D.   Cornell  University  Cooperative  Extension-­‐NYC   212-­‐340-­‐2918  (t)/212-­‐340-­‐2908  (f)   kc458@cornell.edu/djt3@cornell.edu     http://nymarketmaker.cornell.edu   http://nyc.cce.cornell.edu  
    • Thank You!
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