Shutesville Hill Wildlife Crossing
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Shutesville Hill Wildlife Crossing

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A connectivity Bottleneck and Road Crossing

A connectivity Bottleneck and Road Crossing

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Shutesville Hill Wildlife Crossing Shutesville Hill Wildlife Crossing Presentation Transcript

  • Birds excepted, wildlife lack this overhead perspective. To them, approaching and crossing a bottleneck, like Shutevilles Hill, is a series ofcompounding reactions. For many species, this means sticking to the woods and wetlands (light green) and avoiding houses, business and otherbuildings (orange) and often shying away from the more open environments and disturbances of residential, commercial, agricultural areas (lightgray). At Shutesville, wildlife dispersing to and from the larger conserved and protected habitats (dark green) of the Northern Green Mountainsand the more westerly Worcesters are funneled into a relatively short stretch (yellow) along route 100 where both sides of the road supportcontiguous forest and wetlands. Here wildlife tends to cross and approach the roadside with more frequency. On top of these longer dispersalmovements (represented in brown arrows), is a layer of movement associated with home-range usage. Some individuals reside near the crossingand utilize the roadside habitats during day-to-day and seasonal movements (represented in red arrows).