Week 10 Managerial Communication

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Week 10 Managerial Communication

  1. 1. MGF1100: Managerial Communication Week 10: Managerial Communication: Negotiation www.monash.edu.au
  2. 2. Your Tutor (me) Nathan Eva – nathan.eva@monash.edu – 9903 4065 – Building N Level 5 Room 14 – www.slideshare.net/nathaneva www.monash.edu.au 2
  3. 3. Negotiation • In groups – How many of you have purchased a car, home or other big-ticket item? – Did you pay what you wanted to pay? – Why or why not? – When you were successful, what were some things you said or did that helped you get what you wanted www.monash.edu.au 3
  4. 4. Negotiating a Raise • In groups – One is the boss – One is the employee – Two are observers www.monash.edu.au 4
  5. 5. Negotiating a Raise The Boss – You are happy to have this subordinate on your team. S/he is a valuable player. Lately, though, you're concerned that s/he appears a little frazzled. You gave some thought to promoting him/her, after all s/he did just finish his/her MBA, but you wanted to wait a few months to see if s/he appears to be back in control. You've heard through the grapevine that s/he is upset about the fact that others in similar positions are making more than him/her. In this market, you've got to pay big bucks to attract top talent. A raise may be justified, but you believe s/he is likely to be content with a 5% salary increase. Given your concerns about his/her current state, a higher percentage increase—which would come with the promotion you considered him/her for—may put even more pressure on him/her. The Subordinate – You like working at this firm, in fact, you've made lots of friends there. In three years, you've had a lot of successes in your firm. Your reputation as a valuable player extends beyond your immediate department. Many marvel at your ability to balance work, school, and your fiancé while doing well on all fronts. But you finished your degree and expect a raise. After all, brand new MBA hires are making 25% more than you—and they don't even have any experience in your firm. The market for someone with your talents and credentials is heating up, though you really don't want to leave. However, you feel underpaid and under appreciated and will leave if salary adjustments aren't made soon. You see your boss in the copy room and request a meeting with him/her. www.monash.edu.au 5
  6. 6. Negotiating a Raise The Observer(s) – Take careful notes of what each player did or said relative to the following questions: – – – – – – What were some of the positive aspects of how each player negotiated? What strategy did each player use? Which ones were effective? Which were not effective? What frames did each player use? Which ones were effective? Which were not effective? What could each side have done to be more effective in their strategy or during the negotiation? At the conclusion of the negotiation, the observers are to provide feedback to the players while still in their groups. Together, the group should develop a script for how they would approach the situation if given a second chance. www.monash.edu.au 6
  7. 7. Negotiating a Raise The Observer(s) – Take careful notes of what each player did or said relative to the following questions: – – – – – – What were some of the positive aspects of how each player negotiated? What strategy did each player use? Which ones were effective? Which were not effective? What frames did each player use? Which ones were effective? Which were not effective? What could each side have done to be more effective in their strategy or during the negotiation? At the conclusion of the negotiation, the observers are to provide feedback to the players while still in their groups. Together, the group should develop a script for how they would approach the situation if given a second chance. www.monash.edu.au 7

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