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DIGITAL MARKETING TRENDS
2013 & BEYOND
29 AUGUST 2013
NATHALIE MORRIS
MANAGING DIRECTOR
MATT WESTERMAN
DIGITAL ENGAGEMENT ...
As both the digital landscape and consumer
behaviour continue to evolve, we take a look at:
What are the 3 big trends shap...
1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013
2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change
3.Content...
1.Smart use of data will drive the success
stories of 2013
Smart use of data makes our messages relevant to the consumer, ...
1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013
 In this digital age, almost every customer interaction is cap...
AMAZON.COM
SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
AMAZON.COM
SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
After browsing a specific product
category on Amazon.com without
making a purchase,...
AMAZON.COM
SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
After tracking that the first email had
been read, and more products
subsequently b...
AMAZON.COM
SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
This is followed by other emails:
• Recommending cameras of a
different brand.
• A ...
AMAZON.COM
SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
The remaining components of the
programme included:
 Most popular similar products...
AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK)
INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION
“Personality Allowed” campaign consists of pre-flight
and...
AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK)
INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION
Contains location specific and
relevant content for the c...
AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK)
INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION
 Pre-flight emails:
69% open rate
38% click rate
 Post-...
1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013
Across the globe, companies
characterize themselves as “data
dr...
1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013
 If you don’t know where to start, start small and build your ...
SLEEPYHEAD – BED SELECTOR
TRANSACTIONAL DATA
Another good example of using
data to deliver relevance
MICROSOFT XBOX EDM
Microsoft deliver some fun relevant content to members - a
customer’s playing history is compared again...
MICROSOFT XBOX EDM
Data driven content can have its
pitfalls.
In this example there is a fairly
underwhelming statistic.
TARGET (USA)
THERE IS SUCH A THING AS TOO GOOD
Every time you shop, you share intimate
details about your consumption
patt...
TARGET (USA)
HOW THEY DID IT
By researching the purchase habits of customers that had signed up for Target Baby
Registers ...
2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer
behaviour change
As the penetration of smartphones continues to grow, consideration of ...
2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change
• The amount of time spent with mobile is growing at 14 times the ra...
 In 2012, smartphone penetration
in New Zealand was already sitting
at 44%.
SMARTPHONE PENETRATION:
THE IMPACT ON CONSUME...
 71% of NZ smartphone owners
have sent or read email on their
smartphone in 2012. This was the
most popular activity.
SMA...
SMARTPHONE PENETRATION:
EMAILS READ ON MOBILES
Source: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
2...
MOBILE OPTIMISATION BECOMES ESSENTIAL
 Figures for searching and browsing
online are very close behind email
in terms of smartphone activities.
 29% of NZ sma...
SMARTPHONE PENETRATION:
THE IMPACT ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
Source: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012
Sources: ...
MOBILE OPTIMISATION:
HOLDING CONSUMERS HOSTAGE
WHY DID YOU PERSEVERE?
 “Because when I use my mobile I
really need what I...
MOBILE OPTIMISATION:
HOLDING CONSUMERS HOSTAGE
 Mobile optimisation is
increasingly critical as
consumers spend more of t...
3.Content (marketing) is king
Consumers are increasingly shutting off the traditional world of
marketing, rendering it les...
3.Content (marketing) is king
“Your customers don’t care about you, your products, your services…they
care about themselve...
3.Content (marketing) is king
The primary goal of these strategies
are to drive pre- and post-sales
activity.
Google’s ‘Ze...
3.Content (marketing) is king
The traditional web and email
channels remain the most
prominent in terms of delivery of
con...
With the continual rise of content marketing, this leads to an exponential growth
in the number of consumer interactions w...
FOOD FOR THOUGHTFood for thought: McDonald’s Canada challenge
traditional thinking
 The “Our Food, Your Questions” progra...
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
FOOD FOR THOUGHT“When you say 100% beef, do you mean the whole cow, the
organs, snout, brain, kidneys, etc. or just the pl...
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
The results of this campaign:
20,000 questions answered.
2.3 billion social impressions.
13 million video...
Z ENERGY: ASK MIKE
1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013
2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change
3.Content...
ABOUT UBIQUITY
BRINGING CUSTOMERS CLOSER
 Ubiquity helps New Zealand’s leading
brands acquire and retain
customers, gener...
UBIQUITY ENGAGE
DATA-DRIVEN DIGITAL MARKETING
Engage is an integrated marketing suite powered by your
customer data:
 Sup...
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT US
NATHALIE MORRIS, MANAGING DIRECTOR
Phone: 09-303 9374
Mobile: 021-224 5333
Email: nathalie...
Digital Marketing Trends, 2013 & Beyond
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Digital Marketing Trends, 2013 & Beyond

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If you want to take advantage of the coming digital trends and maximise your chances of engaging with today’s digitally distracted customers then you need to watch this webinar.

In this webinar we’ll dive deep into the three big digital marketing trends of 2013 and explain how these trends are changing the behavior of New Zealand consumers.

Presented by Managing Director Nathalie Morris and Digital Engagement Specialist Matt Westerman

Watch the full presentation here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5B0wxUjtIc

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  • Digital marketing is constantly changingTechnologies move fast and so does consumer behaviour in response to thisFor example, was only 6 years ago the phone was released and since then the adoption of smartphones has grown significantly;.Facebook was opened to non-university students 7 years agoDigital technologies have transformed the way we market and one of the key challenges for today’s marketers is keeping up with the speed of change. So what’s on the minds of the world’s marketers?
  • An annual study by research firm econsultancy asks client side marketers to rate the most exciting digital marketing opportunities and we can see here tUbiquity helps New Zealand’s leading brands engage with their customers using data driven digital marketing. In my role as MD I have the pleasure of working with our client organisations across a range of industries and I can say that they see the opportunities as very similar to those in this international study. SO what we thought we’d do today (change slide…)
  • Is look at some of these key areas of opportunities. As we are now in quarter 3 of the year, many of clients are moving into their planning cycles for 2014, and if you are in this stage then over the next 45 minutes we aim to give you some food for thought…
  • As consumers are bombarded with more and more messages through digital channels, data is a key to allows us to increase engagement and conversion. We can make our messages relevant to the consumer and increase the success of these messages.
  • The beauty of it is that in this digital age almost every customer interaction is captured or measurable in some shape or form.Data allows us to get the right message to the right person at the right time.Who’s doing it well? Look at the pioneer o data driven digital marketing (hand over to Matt)
  • Amazon.com as we all know is an e-commerce giant. They are certainly one of the leaders across the globe in terms of an organisation taking full advantage the data they have available to them. I’m sure a lot of you have seen this type of programme in action if you’ve browsed or bought anything online from Amazon.com, or another large commerce site. I guess before we start that it’s important to highlight that amazon being solely an online store, have the luxury of being able to track the activity of everyone who visits their site, and can identify their customers activity by having them log into the account.So to illustrate the type of thing that can be achieved (If you have the luxury of rich data available to you), I’d like to show you through an awesome example of a typical ‘Basket Chaser’ type programme that they run.Within this example, an Amazon customer has browsed for a digital camera, added some products to their basket, and then abandoned their cart and left the site.Amazon have identified that this user obviously represents a hot prospect, and so an automated data driven email chaser campaign is initiated.So the following day, the customer receives the email you can see above in their inbox.The content of the email is positioned as “Customers who have shown interest in point-and shoot cameras, might like to see this weeks best selling models”First and foremost, a highly relevant targeted email sent to the customer at a point that they are still likely to be considering purchasing.
  • So the following day, the customer receives the email you can see above in their inbox.The content of the email is positioned as “Customers who have shown interest in point-and shoot cameras, might like to see this weeks best selling models”First and foremost, a highly relevant targeted email sent to the customer at a point that they are still likely to be considering purchasing.
  • This type of programme isn’t just leveraging my past browsing history on the site, it can also be driven by my interactions with the email programme itself.So based on the fact that I’ve received two previous emails, opened both, and clicked on some products in the email. Amazon.com can make a reasonable assumption that I’m still a hot prospect in the market for a camera.Had I not engaged with these previous emails, then Amazon.com would have stopped contacting me, as I might start to get annoyed with Amazon stalking me. But given I’ve shown interest, it’s worth the gamble to keep sending me emails.
  • So given my interest, Amazon.com then proceed to send me additional emails of interest:Cameras of a different brand‘Deal of the day’ which just so happens to be a camera
  • I guess the key takeway here with this type of programme is YES, this may be considered contact heavy by typical standards,.But it is so HIGHLY TARGETED and RELEVANT to potential customers, then this type of heavy contact is deemed acceptable to customers.I mean given that it’s likely I’m only going to be in the market for a short period of time, then why not send out useful, relevant content that is going to help me make an informed purchase decision.
  • Another case study that I wanted to show you through is a bit of a contrast to Amazon.com and it lends to Nathalies earlier point that you don’t always need vast amounts of rich data in order to create a great personalised experience.It is all in the smart application of using the data that you do have to deliver something great. So this is an example from Air NZ over in the UK, which highlights the fact that you can take little snippets of the information you have, and still create something awesome.This “Personality Allowed” campaign was aimed at injecting some life and soul into what would otherwise be a boring itenarary service type email, and was aimed at giving customers a more personalised experience.It consists of pre-flight and post-arrival emails to passengers containing specific information about their flight, and their destination.
  • So if you think about the information that the business had available to them, they knew to key pieces of info which they utilised (Over and above my normal contact details):When I was due to travelWhere I was travellingSo they really thought about how best to use this information and came up with a great email as you can see.It was delivered to customers in 2 days before their travel dateThey included some a travel ‘Top-Tipo’ for where I was travellingI think this is probably the best touch they made, but they actually used an image of the actual flight attendant that was going to be working on my flight as the friendly attendant sending the email.They’ve also included an weather forecast for the next five days to where I’m travelling.So you can see from the little information that they knew about me, they’ve really thought about how they can use this informatino and translate it into something personalised and USEFUL for their customers.
  • The campaign itself has proven an outstanding success.They’ve had feedback from customers who were just amazed that the person welcoming them onto the plane was the same person waving out to them from the initial email.So it just goes to show even with a little bit of information, you can still deliver something great.
  • Thanks Matt. Recognise that data does represent a challenge. If you are, don’t be overwhelmed.
  • Add in this screenshot
  • Who’s doing it well in New Zealand? These guys are fortunate enough to have transactional data to play with, and significant resources behind their programmes.
  • If you think about it, every time you shop, you are sharing intimate details about your consumption patterns with retailers. And the smart business are listening….they are taking notice. If they can start tracking purchase patterns, then they can start predicting what you might need next, they can get an offer in front of you that is just what you need, before you even know you want it.Target I think are up there with the best of them in terms of data-mining. They have been collecting and analysing this data literally for decades, and they have got bloody good at it too. There’s a lot of talk out there that data analaysts are the next rock stars, they are in hot demand. They can wade through masses of data, make connections and identify patterns that can be translated into something valuable and useful that the business can use. Again, it’s not just collecting the information, it’s useless unless you are actually making smart use of the this data.I’m sure some of you may have heard of this story already, but for those who haven’t I think it’s worth revisiting. I think it’s the nerd in me coming out here, but I just find it absolutely fascinating.So the story goes that an angry father storms up to a local Target store over in America, and demands to talk to the manager.He waves around these coupons for nappies, and says “MY daughter just got these coupons in the mail, are you trying to encourage her to get pregnant!!”The manager obviously completely unaware of what is going on, reassures the customer and apologises for the mix up”.A couple of days later, the manager, obviously feeling terrible about the situation calls up the disgruntled father again to further apologise.The father then confesses that actually, he’s had a little chat with his daughter and she has not been as ‘well behaved’ as he thought, and that she’s actually due in 6 months.
  • The backstory behind this was the fact that apparently a very large percentage of all of our purchase decisions are based on habitual patters. i.e. You buy your milk from your local grocery, you shop at your favourite clothes store etc. etc.These patterns are notoriously hard to change, and that presented a real challenge for target. They are a classic example of the ultimate one stop shop. They sell milk, they sell nappies, they sell juice , they sell clothes, they sell everything. But historically customers never would consider target to source necessities like nappies or milk , as a lot of these items they would be sourced habitually from their local grocery store.HOWEVER…. There are certain periods in your life where these habitual patterns are susceptible to change, and chief among these is during pregnancy and when you start a new family. These customers represent the holy grail to retailers.Marketers cottoned on to this pretty quickly, and eventually were trolling birth records across the country, and targeting new families as soon as their new-born arrived.Target thought, bugger this, we are going to need to go one step further to get there first, and decided to start targeting soon to be mothers before anyone else could get to them. They knew that if they could identify women in their second trimester, there’s a good chance they could capture them for years. Marketers wanted to start getting specially designed ads in front these woman at that specific point.So these data rock stars went away and starting working their magic on the data (Waving their wand around or whatever it is that they actually do to make sense of it all), Target were able to look at customers that had started a baby register with the store, and then work backwards from there to see what they had purchased leading up to that point. Eventually they identified some clear patterns in purchase history, and came up with a method of assigning a ‘Baby score’ to all woman who walked through the door. For example they noticed that pregnant woman in their second trimester tend to buy large quantities of unscented lotion and supplements. Now a lot of people buy lotion, but if you start suddenly buying a lot of unscented lotion, and a large purse that can double as a nappy bag, then it starts to become more likely that you are a pregnant prospect. Based on what you purchased, you were given a baby score, and once this exceeded a certain level, then they were fairly confident that you were in fact pregnant, and would be targeted with special offers relating to your pregnancy. So you can see that Target got pretty damn good at predicting pregnancies, I think it’s a little bit scary really. And from a consumer perspective I think it’s important to consider, this is very close to overstepping the line in terms of what is useful to customers, and what can quite quickly become creepy in the consumers mind. Target have since adapted their strategies so that they now actually include false positives in their mailings, like including an offer for a lawn mower as well as nappies, to give the illusion of randomness to consumers.Well I think that’s probably enough from me on this one, Nat you had better jump back in here before I get carried away here with more anecdotes about these data magicians.
  • Are there more up to date stats than this?
  • Update this graph
  • Make this slide build and possibly show the left hand email in a phone
  • In an (admittedly completely unscientific) piece of research we conducted, we asked an audience of marketers at a Brainy Breakfast event on user experience to tell us how they behaved when they visited un mobile optimised websites. We were predicting an easy win for Option A: Abandonment.But of the attendees who voted, just 30% reported that they’d behaved as expected and exited sites that provided a poor mobile user experience. Incredibly, 70% persevered anyway. Intrigued, we drilled down further into the results, and an interesting trend emerged: of those that did stick around, the reason was, almost unanimously, because they “needed the information”; this was the only available source, and they needed it quickly. Essentially they were hostages – reluctantly putting up with poor user experience as the price of mobile freedom.Some of the insightful feedback from attendees included:
  • So how should marketers interpret this?Well for starters, if you’ve postponed optimising your site for mobile, because of apparently high rates of traffic and click-throughs from smartphones, you might want to consider what truth those results are masking. They may simply be a reflection of market monopoly, rather than a vote of true consumer engagement or satisfaction.Mobile optimisation is increasingly critical as consumers spend more of their online time on mobiles.Consumers can easily move on to a site that supports a better user experience. MIf you are a New Zealand business with a mobile-optimised site – pat yourself on the back, then make sure your customers, and your competitor’s customers, know. It’s a point of difference worth promoting.And if you don’t, consider taking the market lead and offer the optimised experience those we surveyed were missing. Because one thing’s for sure: the next generation of Kiwi customers are unlikely to be as forgiving.
  • Consumers have shut off the traditional world of marketing. They own a DVR to skip television advertising, often ignore magazine advertising, and now have become so adept at online “surfing” that they can take in online information without a care for banners or buttons (making them irrelevant).Smart marketers understand that traditional marketing is becoming less and less effective by the minute, and that there has to be a better way.
  • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2012/06/content-marketing-definition/Selling products that they probably don’t want to hear about by using content they do want to hear about.The words relevant an valuable come out again – as earlier we were talking about using data to drive relevance. Todays consumer is cycnical of marketing and its all about the WIIFM.
  • Can be used at all stages of the buying process
  • Thanks Nat, ahh so to bring to life what Nat has been discussing, I’d like to share with you what I think is one of the best executions of an awesome content marketing strategy I have come across.McDonalds as we all know have had a bit of a battle with public perception over the quality of their products and the subsequent health implications. We all know there are a lot of deep seeded urban myths out there about what Mcdonalds put in there food.I know when I was younger, I used to believe that they actually injected pig fat into their thickshakes. Which I hope is complete rubbish…. But you never know I supposeSo in order to try and address some of these mis-conceptions, rather than a typical advertising approach where you might try and push a message out on the public like an advertising campaign around “we only use 100% real beef in our burgers” or something along those lines.They flipped this thinking on it’s head, and took the gamble to go out to the public and get them to ask the questions they wanted to know. Then Mcdonalds would tackle these questions head-on.Mcdonalds being one of the worlds biggest brands, I think really through their hat in the ring here with this one, and gave the power of the campaign over to the people most likely to question it.I think it also demonstrates that consumers are beginning to expect to be able to interact directly with brands nowadays, it is no longer a one way street, consumers expect to be able to have a conversation with a brand. Particularly when we are talking about the digital space.
  • So in a nutshell the way it worked was that anyone could visit this website, login to a social media account (FB or Twitter) and post a question directly to Mcdonalds.Mcdonalds would then go away and formulate a response to this question.The public could follow questions, and were encouraged to share content to their social networks.Sometimes the answer was as simple as a written response, but for the more sticky questions, Mcdonalds seized the opportunity to create some rich video content in response to the question to really leverage the opportunity to address these deep seeded misconceptions they were trying to overcome.I think the reason why I find this campaign so interesting is the fact that it was the public that essentially gave Mcdonalds the key questions or content to work with. Then based on what the public was asking, Mcdonalds could then generate more content in response to these questions.So then the more questions that were answered, the more public interest was generated……. which resulted in more questions, and more content. The way I look at it it’s like a snowball effect and the campaign itself just becomes a content generating machine.It’s also important to note that throughout the whole campaign, Mcdonalds aren’t trying to sell anything at all, all marketing efforts were focused on sharing valuable rich information to the public, rather than trying to sell anything.
  • The questions that were asked were quite full on. Like “Why does it take unnaturally long for your food to spoil”“How much kangaroo meat is in each burger”Or “Are your hamburgers really made of white food worms?” Don’t quite know if even I would be dumb enough to believe that one…but the question was asked, and Mcdonalds answered this regardless.Overall I think Mcdonalds were extremely transparent in their responses. Instead of keeping the tough questions hidden away, they essentially made them louder. The thinking there being that if they were as open and upfront as possible in their answers, then this would hopefully have the greatest impact on changing consumer pre-conceptions about the brand and their products.
  • The campaign results I think speak for themselves really. I think the key to the success of the campaign, was definitely the quality of the content. It was information that the public was genuinely interested, and so this then lead to the content being amplified across social networks and other online channels.I mean you just have to think that here we are talking about this particular case study from the other side of the world.If you haven’t seen this website yet, it’s definitely worth a visit. I’ll circulate this around after the seminar.
  • Transcript of "Digital Marketing Trends, 2013 & Beyond"

    1. 1. DIGITAL MARKETING TRENDS 2013 & BEYOND 29 AUGUST 2013 NATHALIE MORRIS MANAGING DIRECTOR MATT WESTERMAN DIGITAL ENGAGEMENT SPECIALIST
    2. 2. As both the digital landscape and consumer behaviour continue to evolve, we take a look at: What are the 3 big trends shaping digital marketing in 2013?
    3. 3. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013 2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change 3.Content (marketing) is king
    4. 4. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013 Smart use of data makes our messages relevant to the consumer, giving cut-through in an increasingly cluttered environment
    5. 5. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013  In this digital age, almost every customer interaction is captured or measurable in some shape or form.  Data allows us to get the right message at the right time.  As companies adopt smarter use of their data, there will be a shift towards more frequent, highly targeted campaigns to smaller segments of customers.
    6. 6. AMAZON.COM SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION
    7. 7. AMAZON.COM SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION After browsing a specific product category on Amazon.com without making a purchase, a targeted data driven email campaign is initiated.
    8. 8. AMAZON.COM SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION After tracking that the first email had been read, and more products subsequently browsed on the website, the customer receives an upsell competition email. Automated programmes can leverage customer interaction with components of the programme. i.e. if the customer read the email, and clicked on this offer, then it’s highly likely they will be interested in this email.
    9. 9. AMAZON.COM SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION This is followed by other emails: • Recommending cameras of a different brand. • A ‘Deal of the day’ relating to the same product category.
    10. 10. AMAZON.COM SMART USE OF DATA IN ACTION The remaining components of the programme included:  Most popular similar products  Holiday specific offers  Product cross-sell package offers While this programme is contact heavy, it is highly targeted and delivered at a time when there is a high likelihood of purchase. 119% THE CLICK-THROUGH RATE ON TRIGGERED MESSAGES IS 119% HIGHER THAN “BUSINESS AS USUAL” MESSAGES.
    11. 11. AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK) INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION “Personality Allowed” campaign consists of pre-flight and post-arrival emails to passengers containing a information specific to the customers itinerary. Clever use of data combined with dynamic content creates a personalised experience for the customer.
    12. 12. AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK) INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION Contains location specific and relevant content for the customer Weather information for the destination country dynamically pulled into the email One of the flight staff team working on the actual flight adds a personal touch to the body of the email The message is delivered to the customer when interest is at its peak
    13. 13. AIR NEW ZEALAND (UK) INCREASED RELEVANCE THROUGH PERSONALISATION  Pre-flight emails: 69% open rate 38% click rate  Post-arrival emails: 62% open rate 40% click rate “Incredibly positive feedback from customers and crew”
    14. 14. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013 Across the globe, companies characterize themselves as “data driven”, but most still see big gaps and opportunities in how they utilise data. Collecting the information is one thing, making effective use of this data is another.
    15. 15. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013  If you don’t know where to start, start small and build your efforts over time.  Consider data you already hold, or can easily collect and store  Start targeting and personalising with a few segments to test and learn.
    16. 16. SLEEPYHEAD – BED SELECTOR
    17. 17. TRANSACTIONAL DATA
    18. 18. Another good example of using data to deliver relevance
    19. 19. MICROSOFT XBOX EDM Microsoft deliver some fun relevant content to members - a customer’s playing history is compared against interesting world-wide usage statistics.
    20. 20. MICROSOFT XBOX EDM Data driven content can have its pitfalls. In this example there is a fairly underwhelming statistic.
    21. 21. TARGET (USA) THERE IS SUCH A THING AS TOO GOOD Every time you shop, you share intimate details about your consumption patterns with retailers. Target has been collecting and analysing this detailed information for decades. They are just so good at it now that they know whether you have a baby on the way well before you start buying nappies, and a good guess as to what sex too.
    22. 22. TARGET (USA) HOW THEY DID IT By researching the purchase habits of customers that had signed up for Target Baby Registers across the country they discovered common purchase patterns at certain stages of pregnancy, e.g: • A lot of people buy lotion, but they noticed that a lot of woman on the baby register seemed to buy large quantities of unscented lotion around the beginning of their second trimester. • They also load up on supplements like calcium, magnesium and zinc. “Take a fictional Target shopper named Jenny Ward, who is 23, lives in Atlanta and in March bought cocoa-butter lotion, a purse large enough to double as a diaper bag, zinc and magnesium supplements and a bright blue rug. There’s, say, an 87 percent chance that she’s pregnant and that her delivery date is sometime in late August.” – Target analyst Target have since adjusted their marketing offers to include false positives specifically to give customers the illusion that they don’t know exactly what you want.
    23. 23. 2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behaviour change As the penetration of smartphones continues to grow, consideration of the mobile experience is becoming increasingly important
    24. 24. 2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change • The amount of time spent with mobile is growing at 14 times the rate of desktop. Mobile is picked to exceed desktop usage in the coming years. • It’s not just the time spent on mobile that is important, it is the growing range of activities that consumers are undertaking that are shaping how consumers interact with brands. • Consumers aren’t just reading emails on their phones, there is a steady rise in search activity, product research, and mobile commerce. • There is a steady progression towards the “Constantly Connected Consumer”.
    25. 25.  In 2012, smartphone penetration in New Zealand was already sitting at 44%. SMARTPHONE PENETRATION: THE IMPACT ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Source: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012.
    26. 26.  71% of NZ smartphone owners have sent or read email on their smartphone in 2012. This was the most popular activity. SMARTPHONE PENETRATION: THE IMPACT ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
    27. 27. SMARTPHONE PENETRATION: EMAILS READ ON MOBILES Source: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Ubiquity Smartphones Ubiquity Mobile Devices
    28. 28. MOBILE OPTIMISATION BECOMES ESSENTIAL
    29. 29.  Figures for searching and browsing online are very close behind email in terms of smartphone activities.  29% of NZ smartphone owners had purchased a product/service online. SMARTPHONE PENETRATION: THE IMPACT ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
    30. 30. SMARTPHONE PENETRATION: THE IMPACT ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Source: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012 Sources: Google/Sterling Research/SmithGeiger, July 2012. eMarketer, Oct 2012 WITH THE ADOPTION OF SMARTPHONES COMES CHANGES IN CONSUMER EXPECTATIONS  Mobile optimisation is becoming the norm, and as consumers expectations change, the penalty for not optimising increases significantly.  According to a 2013 BlueHornet annual research report, 80% of consumers say they will immediately delete an email if it isn’t mobile optimised. This is a 10% increase on 2012.
    31. 31. MOBILE OPTIMISATION: HOLDING CONSUMERS HOSTAGE WHY DID YOU PERSEVERE?  “Because when I use my mobile I really need what I am looking for – not just looking around!”  “Lack of motivation to search for another site, at the risk of getting the same result.”  “Because I wanted to see the sale items. But often won’t click through to sites on mobile because I know the experience isn’t great.”
    32. 32. MOBILE OPTIMISATION: HOLDING CONSUMERS HOSTAGE  Mobile optimisation is increasingly critical as consumers spend more of their online time on mobiles.  Consumers can easily move on to a site that supports a better user experience.  Currently consumer expectations are low, but this will change quickly.
    33. 33. 3.Content (marketing) is king Consumers are increasingly shutting off the traditional world of marketing, rendering it less effective. Enter content marketing.
    34. 34. 3.Content (marketing) is king “Your customers don’t care about you, your products, your services…they care about themselves, their wants and their needs. Content marketing is about creating interesting information your customers are passionate about so they actually pay attention to you. “ The key trend that is emerging is companies promoting information instead of the company itself.
    35. 35. 3.Content (marketing) is king The primary goal of these strategies are to drive pre- and post-sales activity. Google’s ‘Zero Moment of Truth’ research finds that consumers need twice as many sources of information before making a decision than they did just one year ago.
    36. 36. 3.Content (marketing) is king The traditional web and email channels remain the most prominent in terms of delivery of content marketing activities (83%). Companies are also starting to branch out to other delivery platforms to increase their reach.
    37. 37. With the continual rise of content marketing, this leads to an exponential growth in the number of consumer interactions with a brand…Consumers are beginning to expect this type of direct conversation. Social and other network channels provide the perfect vehicle to amplify both content reach and ROI. The key challenge is to create authentic content that is going to deliver real value to consumers. 3.Content (marketing) is king
    38. 38. FOOD FOR THOUGHTFood for thought: McDonald’s Canada challenge traditional thinking  The “Our Food, Your Questions” program invites any Canadian to ask any question whatsoever about McDonald’s food.  Historically companies would actively avoid this type of open ended direct contact with customers…BUT…the rules are changing.  To ask a question, participants must connect with either Twitter or Facebook, providing social visibility and a ripple in the pond effect.
    39. 39. FOOD FOR THOUGHT
    40. 40. FOOD FOR THOUGHT“When you say 100% beef, do you mean the whole cow, the organs, snout, brain, kidneys, etc. or just the plain beef we buy at the grocer?” “Hi Jani. We wouldn’t call it plain beef, but it sure is beef. We only use meat cut from the shoulder, chuck, brisket, rib eye, loin and round. In fact, our beef supplier is Cargill, a name you might recognize. They’re the biggest supplier of beef in Canada.” “How much Kangaroo meat is in each hamburger?” “None, Michael. There is absolutely no kangaroo meat in each hamburger. Not at McDonald's Canada. Not even at McDonald's Australia. Their burgers are just upside down. “
    41. 41. FOOD FOR THOUGHT The results of this campaign: 20,000 questions answered. 2.3 billion social impressions. 13 million video views.
    42. 42. Z ENERGY: ASK MIKE
    43. 43. 1.Smart use of data will drive the success stories of 2013 2.Mobile usage is shaping consumer behavioural change 3.Content (marketing) is king
    44. 44. ABOUT UBIQUITY BRINGING CUSTOMERS CLOSER  Ubiquity helps New Zealand’s leading brands acquire and retain customers, generate leads and increase sales, and grow advocacy using data driven digital marketing.  Whatever your marketing goals, Ubiquity can assist your team to translate strategic objectives into tactical online activities that deliver real, measurable results.  We do this through our Engage digital marketing platform along with a range of related services tailored to your needs.
    45. 45. UBIQUITY ENGAGE DATA-DRIVEN DIGITAL MARKETING Engage is an integrated marketing suite powered by your customer data:  Support for highly personalised outbound messaging via email, SMS, personalised landing pages and in-app notifications.  Capture data through online surveys, web forms, SMS and social media integration.  Run trigger-based and automated programmes.  Set up multi-channel campaigns and programmes.  Understand and connect with customers like never before with a single customer view.
    46. 46. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT US NATHALIE MORRIS, MANAGING DIRECTOR Phone: 09-303 9374 Mobile: 021-224 5333 Email: nathalie@ubiquity.co.nz MATT WESTERMAN, DIGITAL ENGAGEMENT SPECIALIST Phone: 09-303 9377 Mobile: 027-878 2997 Email: matt@ubiquity.co.nz
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