Gender Communication In Media

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Gender Communication In Media

  1. 1. Gender Communication in Media Nate Prince
  2. 2. Media There is no such thing as “the media” that exists as one large, singular being “Media” is a plural term that includes TV, radio, movies, newspapers, magazines, the Internet, and books, among others While operating as separate entities, media tend to have overriding, dominant themes that shape, influence, and reinforce identity
  3. 3. Media as an Institution Media Economics Media and Power Media and Hegemony Media Polyvalence and Oppositional Readings QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  4. 4. Media Economics Media is not just art, but is a commercial product that exists in part to make money It is usually targeted at certain groups in order to sell certain products Commodification is a result QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  5. 5. Media and Power Media can liberate as well as constrain, often at the same time It is always influencing norms about every aspect of identity, including gender Media is “simultaneously, a commodity, an art form, and an important ideological forum for public discourse and social issues and social change” (Dow 1996)
  6. 6. Media and Power QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  7. 7. Media and Hegemony The hegemonic way society is perceived needs to be maintained and reinforced Contradictions appear as media both reinforce norms and create opposition at the same time QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  8. 8. Media Polyvalence and Oppositional Readings The meanings interpreted from media depend on the audience Viewing media in a critical way requires work and critical skills, such as a gendered lens QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  9. 9. Interlocking Institutions Media are “the mechanisms by which other institutions are represented and constructed.” QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  10. 10. Body Image Media effect male gender norms as well as female, and is increasingly influencing male body image QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  11. 11. Media Research Media Content: -analysis that quantifies what is in media and assumes effects Media Effects: -tries to put numbers to the effects of content analysis QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  12. 12. Gazes “Gaze” is the way a medium is looked at, predominantly from the White male perspective Our gender roles are influenced by how we think the world looks at us QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  13. 13. The Oppositional Gaze As long as we understand that media is putting is in a certain perspective, we can actively seek to view media from a different point of view and create our own counter messages QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  14. 14. The Oppositional Gaze Some identities are commodified, and sold to people who identify with other groups QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  15. 15. Media as Liberator and Constraining Gender is Constructed and Thus Always in Flux Resecuring Genders’ Borders Progressive Representations Resecure Traditional Gender Norms New Technologies Replicate Old Gender Norms QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  16. 16. Gender is Always Changing More than ever before media is addressing the idea of “how to be a Man” Publications have always existed about how to be feminine, but the idea of masculinity was considered obvious Race and ethnicity influences how culture construct gender roles and identities Ideas, such as “feminism”, are sometimes commodified and used to sell products
  17. 17. Gender Borders Some are worried that the idea of masculinity is being destabilized We see the results of this fear in such films as Fight Club QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  18. 18. Progressive Representations Resecure Traditional Gender Norms Media constrains gender identity even when it seems it is liberating Subordinate roles are still seen within the framework of existing cultural norms QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  19. 19. New Tech Replicates Old Norms The Internet was supposed to transcend gender, age, race, ethnicity, and every other gender identity There is still a digital divide that restricts Internet access to many people Gender identities are just as important in online communication as they are in any other form of communication
  20. 20. Conclusion Media allows for a large range of gender roles to be performed, but there are still limits In order to consume media effectively, we must use a gendered lens and understand that we can be active participants rather than simply passive bystanders QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

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