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Social Media and Hospice
 

Social Media and Hospice

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Presented in April 2010 at the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization's conference, this slideshow discusses demographics, strategy, HIPAA concerns, social media policies and specific pros ...

Presented in April 2010 at the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization's conference, this slideshow discusses demographics, strategy, HIPAA concerns, social media policies and specific pros and cons for Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogging.

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  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • Here is what we are planning to cover today. When we first started, we also wanted to include social media for peer-to-peer communications (as in professional uses). Decided this was too much, even for 3 hours, so focused specifically on reaching the general public.
  • Between us, we got together and looked at how these “Tools” could be of benefit for hospice. While people logically think Sales and Marketing, in fact, there are many other departments who might want to participate, and might in fact find more actual, measurable benefit given the time required to invest. Some tools are better suited than others.
  • Investing in a Social Media presence, should be treated like any media purchase. You want to think in terms of some basic issues. We will be presenting on these topics regarding 4 different Social Media platforms: Facebook, Blogging, Twitter and You Tube
  • What makes the Internet special? How is it different from other marketing media you might use or purchase? Multiple media: Audio and video, Fun Interactivity: Bi-directional communication, relationship building. What is hospice if not about building relationships Search-ability: Worldwide web. Blessing and a curse Pre-qualified audience: Cost effective!! 24/7 accessibility: transcend space and time. Midnight in their pajamas Easy/inexpensive to disseminate: relative to print Observe & create community (Facebook, Linked In, Twitter). Remember 2 ears, one mouth 5 MINUTES
  • Most like print media: Publisher to reader Even broadcast is generally one way: Push communication Excellent way to present resources to an audience
  • Invite engagement. Remove barriers. Build relationships When you see a page that has text fields, radio buttons, checkboxes, this is 2-way communication. Asking for input from your viewers, and hopefully responding to it. Interactivity is the most concrete action. Means the person is committing to you in some way. Is often the way you deliver services online (exchange of information/registration,donation, purchase of merchandise…)
  • Instead of one publisher, anyone can publish, either by making comments to the things you say (on a blog), or by having a page of their own (e.g., Facebook, YouTube). Instead of uni-directional monologue, or bi-directional dialogue, is an open conversation: Many-to-many Democratization: Has been considered the democratization of the Net. When time said the Person of the Year is “You”. This is what they meant. We each can have a presence now. Makes room for “citizen journalism” like what happened in Iran. No power brokers mediating information. Community: Because it’s an open conversation, allows people to more easily gather in groups of like-minded folks without having the limitation of time and distance. Everyone gets a chance to speak. Plus, you get to “meet” or reach the friends of your friends, simply by observing who is connected to who. Marketing: How does this apply to marketing: No longer marketing to but rather it’s about getting people excited about your brand and as they talk about it, they are in essence marketing you to their network. Becomes a “marketing with” proposition. In fact, bald faced marketing will have people fleeing. Honest relationship: Cultural expectations and styles of communication. Expectation of the culture is transparency. You become more of a person, not just a brand. Your presence indicates you want to have a conversation with your viewers, not just talk at them. Means you need to show some spirit and personality. Also, like any relationship, you need to show commitment and stick=to=itiveness. Highly engaged: Expectation that you will check frequently and respond. That you will post regularly. (You decide how often). But you are checking because you want to respond to the viewers who bother to say things to you. Even if you don’t publish often, this is a great way to learn about the concerns of your market, and at the least learn what customers think about your industry and your brand in particular.
  • Instead of one publisher, anyone can publish, either by making comments to the things you say (on a blog), or by having a page of their own (e.g., Facebook, YouTube). Instead of uni-directional monologue, or bi-directional dialogue, is an open conversation: Many-to-many Democratization: Has been considered the democratization of the Net. When time said the Person of the Year is “You”. This is what they meant. We each can have a presence now. Makes room for “citizen journalism” like what happened in Iran. No power brokers mediating information. Community: Because it’s an open conversation, allows people to more easily gather in groups of like-minded folks without having the limitation of time and distance. Everyone gets a chance to speak. Plus, you get to “meet” or reach the friends of your friends, simply by observing who is connected to who. Marketing: How does this apply to marketing: No longer marketing to but rather it’s about getting people excited about your brand and as they talk about it, they are in essence marketing you to their network. Becomes a “marketing with” proposition. In fact, bald faced marketing will have people fleeing. Honest relationship: Cultural expectations and styles of communication. Expectation of the culture is transparency. You become more of a person, not just a brand. Your presence indicates you want to have a conversation with your viewers, not just talk at them. Means you need to show some spirit and personality. Also, like any relationship, you need to show commitment and stick=to=itiveness. Highly engaged: Expectation that you will check frequently and respond. That you will post regularly. (You decide how often). But you are checking because you want to respond to the viewers who bother to say things to you. Even if you don’t publish often, this is a great way to learn about the concerns of your market, and at the least learn what customers think about your industry and your brand in particular.
  • Is like a public diary: Captain’s log See date at top Frequent entries about a variety of topics. Whatever is on the mind of the writer(s), or the editorial calendar of the company This one is by a hospice music therapy volunteer as a guest writer: Sort of a “Day in the life of” story. Written first person. Notice has nice big photo. Can have videos. Blogs don’t have to be just words, but words are easy.
  • Easiest way to dip toe in the waters of Web 2.0 Is the most like a webpage. Text heavy. If you can write on demand, you can blog.
  • Often called micro-blogging because you are only allowed 140 characters. Keep it short and sweet: Digital haiku.
  • Good for quick insights and announcements, leading people to your website. Here is my twitter page showing me my list of “tweets”, things I have posted with links to articles on my company site You’ll see there are tweeters and then followers: I have 68 followers: people who have decided they want to receive my tweets. And then 7 people that I follow, pictures on the right. Twitter posts (tweets) can be entered via cell phone. But you can also look at your account online to see what you’ve posted.
  • This is a sample of a “Twitter Feed” of the people I follow. Remember, this is about everybody publishing and everyone else getting to decide whose materials they are interested in. So when I log in to my account, I can dip in and view what the people I follow have been thinking and tweeting about in the last few hours, days. Web 2.0 is very stream of consciousness. I think of it as a river of thought. You aren’t going to be able to necessarily keep up with every post (although it is designed so you can enter and receive tweets via your cell phone), but I can dip my cup in the river and get an interesting sampling of what’s up right now. It is often called the “super now”.
  • Is a great way to build excitement in the moment.In a non-hospice example, one bakery has a twitter account and they might post: “The cinnamon buns just came out of the oven. The smell is heavenly.” Anyone in the area that is following them will have their salivary glands going and head down to the bakery! Super-now events where you could use Twitter might be at a fund-raiser: Think of reporting on a race or at the Alive Hospice music benefit at the Bluebird Cafe.
  • Add here that YouTube has the technology to send video out probably faster than your own ISP can. Better to store your videos on YouTube and get the search engine advantages, then have your webmaster put code in your company webpage that will make the video appear to play from your site.
  • Because is a simple layout, and the same layout for everyone, allows for certain freedoms. Everyone knows to go to the Info page for the basics.
  • Can upload photo albums for people to peruse. (Can also put keywords into the photos so if someone is on Facebook searching for something you have a photo of--a fundraiser, a Hospice House--your entries will come up.)
  • The Wall is perhaps the most interesting part. This is where you post entries about what is going on. Small. And then your community of Fans can respond. (See Fans in lower left). Every time you post, the post appear’s on your Fans’ walls, so their friends can see… Entry 1: Hospice looking for a place to show a film. A Fan is suggesting a venue. Entry 2: Hospice announcing a presentation on caregiver resources. A Fan says they like this, which means this will post on the Fan’s wall and all of his/her friends will see. Entry 3: Hospice directing people to LA Times article about doctors’ reluctance to talk about hospice to cancer pts… Entry 4: Announcement of hospice volunteer recruitment with link to hospice’s website… (Links are good!)
  • Fans start suporting you themselves, “marketing with” Alumni club raised money for hospice Someone responded to share about how wonderful hospice was for their family…
  • Glad to be here. Welcome everyone. E-newsletters are a medium near and dear to my heart as they allow hospices to very cost-effectively get the word out and promote important activities, like fund-raising, referrals and volunteer recruitment and retention. And they provide a convenient medium for readers to get the information that they want or need. One of those happy marriages of marketing and education. Pat yourselves on the back for taking the first step to learn about this new medium. Tell you a bit about myself. Research scientist, I spent 14 years working on NIA projects, specifically big multimedia interventions for family caregivers. In my private life, I have been a hospice volunteer since 1997 Disconnect. Realized this was a way that I could help. Can’t solve global warming, can’t fix the problems in Iraq. But I can help families get better access to information and services, specifically the fantastic support that is offered by hospices. So, my personal mission is to help hospices make better use of the Internet for outreach, fund-raising, community education, etc. Enough about me. I want to learn more about you.
  • From Pew Internet and American Life Project, broke down activities by subpopulations Overall Internet Use: Predictable decline as get older. High searching of health info in this crowd. (Compare to 28% of teens.) Email is ubiquitous. A favorite of seniors. The forgotten stepchild. One of the reasons I think e-newsletters are a viable medium with an older adult demographic. Watch videos online may be surprising. As an aside: Convio study on the Wired Wealthy: Of major donors ( > $1000), 52% report going to YouTube at least once in the last year. Read blogs: Is commentary, not news. Tends to be entertaining. Younger generations use the Net for entertainment and socializing. In general, older generations use it for research, to answer a question or solve a problem. Blogs not as strongly embraced in the older generations Social Networking: While big hoopla about Boomers Facebook presence quadrupling, it’s not hard to go from 2% - 8%. But if look at 9% of 77% of the total population, this is not critical mass—YET. Still, depending on what you’re wanting to accomplish, which department has what objective, indeed, it might be.
  • Let’s look at participation by younger Internet users. If your objectives revolve around this group, you absolutely need to be thinking in terms of social media. These are “Net Natives”. Have never been in a world that didn’t have the Internet. They look to the Internet for socializing and entertainment as well as research. Older generations tend to look mostly to solve a problem: research. High searching of health info in 18-32 yr olds, but more likely for nutrition, STDs, pregnancy and pediatrics. Email is ubiquitous high on the older end here. Notice how low among teens. They are texting (cell phone text messages) and instant messages. Email is passe for them. But very high for 18 and over. Watch videos online is high: I imagine it drops off in 33-44 yo because active parenting and career years. Read blogs: Clearly a younger generation medium 43-49% of 12-32 yr olds. Is commentary, not news. Tends to be entertaining. Younger generations use the Net for entertainment and socializing. In general, older generations use it for research, to answer a question or solve a problem. Social Networking: Socializing and entertainment is obvious here. 65-67% of 12-32 yr olds do social networking. If you are looking to develop a teen program, you MUST have a social media presence.
  • Glad to be here. Welcome everyone. E-newsletters are a medium near and dear to my heart as they allow hospices to very cost-effectively get the word out and promote important activities, like fund-raising, referrals and volunteer recruitment and retention. And they provide a convenient medium for readers to get the information that they want or need. One of those happy marriages of marketing and education. Pat yourselves on the back for taking the first step to learn about this new medium. Tell you a bit about myself. Research scientist, I spent 14 years working on NIA projects, specifically big multimedia interventions for family caregivers. In my private life, I have been a hospice volunteer since 1997 Disconnect. Realized this was a way that I could help. Can’t solve global warming, can’t fix the problems in Iraq. But I can help families get better access to information and services, specifically the fantastic support that is offered by hospices. So, my personal mission is to help hospices make better use of the Internet for outreach, fund-raising, community education, etc. Enough about me. I want to learn more about you.
  • Have talked about what these different media are, and given examples of what departments might benefit. Now let’s look at the broader picture of why would you do this? What can you achieve and how will you know you have achieved it. Reasons everyone is paying attention to Social Media. Some of the most visited sites on the Web. Facebook and blogs are becoming a parallel Web. Each one of these sites is becoming it’s own search engine
  • Which leads to why, from a business point of view, social networking is a factor to reckon with. You can attract attention to yourself by being where people are looking. This is an older Web 1.0 statistic, but it gives you and idea of how to get people to find out about you. Only dedicated hospice seekers will go to your website. You need to reach people by being where they are going and then linking to your company site.
  • So the first, easiest reason to do social media, and therefore best way to measure your success, is to think in terms of increasing traffic and exposure via your social networking tools. You should be able to see, from your own website, how people are getting to you: “Traffic source”. With more exposure in these other venues, you will have the traffic at those sites (which you can measure) as well as increased traffic at your company site (with data as to where they came from). Website traffic isn’t the end-all, however. You probably have a call to action, or some purpose you are hoping to achieve: More direct-from-family referrals; More donations or participation in fund-raisers, employment or volunteer applications (perhaps from younger applicants). You know how you measure those; just be sure you are also tracking how people heard of you.
  • But the other side of why people launch a Web 2.0 venture is much harder to measure. How do you measure community? Networking? Is like the difference between quantitative and qualitative research. You need both. The very unique qualities of Web 2.0 falls very much in the qualitative research side. Analytics are offered on many of the tools Number of viewers; sometimes demographics How much time they spend on the page and what they are viewing The depth and quality of the exchanges can be a measure, but wouldn’t hold my breath Can find out # of forwards Who is posting links to your postings (e.g., Trackbacks in Blogs) Less quantifiable, but absolutely valuable: The insights you gain from conversations? Feedback or even damage control?
  • Not exactly sequential. Often need to create a presence to observe. Can create a low-key presence and then beef up later. Observe: What are others doing? Competitors? People you admire, even in other interest areas. What media do they employ? What seems to generate comments/interaction? What would you emulate? What would you do differently? Determine a strategy: Why want to do this? What do you want to achieve? How will you know if you have succeeded? May want to simply leverage what others are doing. Not post on your own pages so much as post on other people’s or get others to post about you. Which departments are involved? Who are you trying to reach? Which tool is best? Can use aggregators like ping.fm so post on blog and it goes to FB, and Twitter.
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • A global social networking site. Users can add friends and send them messages, and update their personal profiles to notify friends about themselves. You have the ability to create a personalized desk space. Social networking medium to connect with anyone that has a similar interest as yours.
  • -400 million active users -more than 100 million users have the mobile device facebook appli. -50% of active users log in to facebook any given day. -pages create more than 5.3 BILLION fans! -more than 35 million update their status every day. -more than 3 million active pages -more than 1.5 million of local business have facebook pages. -average user has about 130 friends -average user spend about 55 mins a day in facebook Back in November more than 10 million became fan of pages every day, so it has grown by 10 million in less than 6 months!
  • Personal Page: Create a personal profile.
  • Fan Page: The profile page for your Company! Great awareness tool, Event Planning and fundraising. Basic Information of your company Videos and photos Articles of Interest Resources, Event Calendar, etc… MCHgrp. ; MWctr
  • Mission statement Website information Contact Person
  • Pictures.
  • Notes and Causes Through your fan page or group you can open a cause for you agency. It has to be a 501(c)3 and be registered with “guidestar”(database for beneficiary information). Donations are paid the 15 th of every month and they are sent to you via a third party payer source(Network for Good). Network for good will keep 4.75% of the donation.
  • In order to accept donations through Causes, a nonprofit must be a 501(c)3 that is also registered with GuideStar Online donations must also be enabled in your profile with GuideStar; Once a donation is made on Causes and processed by Network for Good, payment for donations made to your nonprofit are sent on the 15th of each month to the address listed in GuideStar and will include all donations made on Causes during the previous month. For more details, please visit http://www.networkforgoodcheck.org/ . 
  • Departmental Uses: Fundraising: Can utilize the causes features in order to reach an entire group or fan page to donate to your specific cause. Human Resources: Facebook has become a great tool for recruitment and job posting. Marketing, PR and Outreach: By creating a Fan Page you can develop a social networking community. Advocacy: Share important information that will get your community involve and this information will be posted on everyone's page
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • We are not lawyers. Will not be exhaustive, but it was exhausting. Section that gave us the most heartburn. Kudos in particular to Susan and Liza for their excellent research in this area. Also Allison Gibson, a grad student working with Susan looking at teen use of social media for health promotion activities.
  • But this is user-generated content. What is our responsibility to protect people from themselves? The jury is still out.
  • Even though you may have completely non-clinical objectives with your Web 2.0 endeavors, user-generated content may not comply. Where is your responsibility in terms of protecting private information? What about the participant’s self- responsibility? This is what we’re hoping to shed some light on. Things that you could have control over (staff postings), you are responsible for. The more grey area, however, has to do with inappropriate patient self-disclosure, or disclosure of a family member’s situation (e.g., in the context of a family caregiver, for instance.)
  • It appears that postings on an individual’s page are the individual’s property and since the individual is not a covered entity, no expectation of privacy or need for HIPAA compliance. Some thought that because Facebook and Twitter and these hosting services are not covered entities, no need for them to follow HIPAA procedures. (That said, Facebook has recently upgraded it’s privacy settings so people can more specifically delineate what level of friends can access what level of information--their wall, their address, their photos…) What if a hospital (or hospice) were to set up a social networking site of its own on its own server: For instance, an online grief support group for teens? Because it’s a covered entity that owns the hardware and has control, would need to be encrypted, password protected… What if they set up a Fan Page? The hosting service is not a covered entity, but is the fact that the page is sponsored by or “created by” a covered entity mean that HIPAA regulations are in effect? What about inappropriate comments or posts on a Wall? That’s the unknown. Facebook Group can require an agreement upon joining. But can’t necessarily enforce. If infraction, can kick the person out of the group. Also, can be set up to be secret, meaning the posts and membership do not show up on the personal profile page. But, none of this really guarantees privacy. Who knows if a member is who they say they are? Hackers can get into these spaces. Communications are not encrypted…But maybe HIPAA does not apply because it’s Facebook that actually owns the data???
  • You are absolutely responsible for what your staff publishes on your official site. You must take precautions PHI is anything that is unique identifiable and could be used to trace back to the identity of an individual: Name, photo, story, name of a relative, email address, voice…But even things like the name/time/place of a funeral. Have more than one person look at postings in the beginning. Need multiple perspectives.
  • Although these are not suit-proof, they do show an attempt to protect people from themselves.
  • Web 2.0, as casual and conversational as it is, is a record. It stays visible in perpetuity. What someone might say to a friend on the phone is not as public as what they might tweet, or post on their Facebook page.
  • But let’s not forget there are astounding benefits social media can offer. Social support has absolutely been shown to improve outcomes for a large range of conditions. And think about the casual information or connections that people might glean that could really help them, not to mention the positives for your organization as people get to know you more and see you as a helpful force in the community. And this media isn’t going to go away. We need to figure out how to use it responsibly with the knowledge we have now, and our best instinct for integrity.
  • There are early adopters. These are not small players. They have banks of lawyers and have figured out ways to ameliorate the risks.
  • We’ll be talking about more of these later, not specifically about HIPAA. But talk to your Risk management folks and see if there are policies that would help them feel more comfortable about social media participation
  • Safest of all is to be in control and host a community on your own server, then you can be much more on top of things like firewalls, passwords and encryption Choose the most conservative of the media for starters: blogging. Although not secure necessarily (unless you set it up on your own server), you will be able to set up your blog so you can review posts and delete them before they are public. Can also set up your Facebook and Twitter and YouTube accounts to notify you immediately when someone makes a post. You can then go check and delete the post if it seems inappropriate. (High time intensive, and how do you handle the weekends? Where is the line about patient responsibility? And how long is too long for an inappropriate post to be up?)
  • There is a line between the law and what is practical. We all deal with that every day. While HIPAA is a concern, and violations fall more in the context of the government prosecuting you, the truth is the government has not brought many HIPAA cases to court. Increased penalties were recently passed, but there is ample room in the writing distinguishing willful neglect and a breach occuring. The biggest threat with social media is self-disclosure. In other aspects of privacy law, it seems clear that there is an acknowledgement of self-responsibility. This is all very new, but in the interim, while we’re waiting for specific standards to evolve, there are agencies out there participating so we know it can be done. You just need to figure out for yourselves, what technological and administrative strategies will work for you to offset any risks you identify for your own particular usage.
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • ¼ of the ¾ of online middle-aged people read blogs.
  • Captain’s Log Title of the entry Author Date Ability to subscribe: RSS, email Text and/or photos, videos, polls… Categories: Think of these as file folders. They also tell people the subjects you typically cover. Strategically, they should define your scope and involve the keywords you think your target audience is likely to search for. SEO is one of the main reasons to blog. Archives allows people to access past posts by month Blogroll is a list of links to other online resources you think are useful. Link to your company site (several different places), but also to other educational resources and informative bloggers. Linking currency on the Internet and is how people network, stay useful, and promote their sites (reciprocal linking).
  • [Alive Contributors] Alive Hospice has many authors. Standard to give a little bio of each. Notice all the links, links, links. Part of blogging is defining yourself as a person who helps others get the info they want. More links, the more you are seen as a resource. The more you are a resource, the more people bookmark you and come back. Return visitors are the holy grail of Internet marketing!
  • [Alive Leave Comment] Big part of blogging is asking for and responding to comments. Some even allow commenters to be notified when someone else has commented on an entry.
  • [AliveComment String] Comments appear at the end of articles in chronological order
  • [WordPress] This is what makes a blog special. Blog software provides a VERY simple interface for creating content on a web page. Is software that exists on the web. Can be inserted inside your web pages (requires programming knowledge), or you can rent space on a server that has it all set up for you. Looks very familiar: Title Text Tool bars - Upload images, videos, music or podcasts - Format your text much like word - Have options for making links, very much like the toolbar on my.nhpco if you’ve used that. Can make drafts and preview before publishing Can determine the categories (strategic file folders defining the scope of your blog) Can set “Tags” to highlight special entries (a person’s name, a company you are featuring…). Smaller than categories. More of them.
  • [Hospice Experience] Many ways to use a blog: Educating the public about hospice issues (Dispelling Myths)
  • [Piedmont] Reaching Family Caregivers; not the buttons at the bottom to share on other social media
  • [Alive TV Show] Nashville NPR did a documentary on hospice care featuring Alive Hospice. Had been using the blog to build up the event. (Notice the previous day’s entry is by a hospice nurse and what it was like to have the camera crew there doing a “Day-in-the-Life of” ride-along.
  • [Pallimed] Issue about Dept of Transportation not allowing roadside memorials. 3 min video.
  • [Alive] Bluebird Café, Songwriter concert series where percentage of the proceeds go to hospice
  • [Alive Advocacy] For advocacy and community activism: Prompting people with links to connect to their congressional prepresentatives, the White House. Link to sign up for NHPCO’s Action Alerts. Very savvy us of the linking power of the Internet: Make it easy for people to take action
  • [AliveVolunteer] Let volunteers tell their story. Talk about different programs you have (or photos: Pet therapy program)
  • [AliveSocialWorker] Great story about what it means to work there, to do the work. See the 5 Comments. This was other social workers commenting and adding their own perspective…Good for HR, also good for PR.
  • [RemCare] By now, I think you are getting the idea of how you can actively use the blog medium to support MANY different hospice endeavors. People search for a topic, your blogpost may come up. You promote your blog locally, people subscribe. Link liberally to your website and you will get SEO advantages…And through all of this, you put information out, people can share information back. Now let’s talk about this medium for communicating with patients and families. Families are wanting digital communication, and the simplicity of the blog interface is ideal. BUT, because sensitive information, you need to have private blogs: with a tunnel to each family individually, password protection, and all of this stored on an encrypted server.
  • [RemCare] Can be done, but easier to hire others who have set up a system and you plug in. Remcare is such a system. Repurposed blog software, borrowing the easy interface and chronological format, but putting it to new use in a secure environment
  • When you think of it, if the HIPAA issues can be addressed, the ease of posting makes this a very convenient way to deal with non-emergent questions and observations. Families are asking for digital ways to communicate. These companies offer some options. All can be branded with your name and logo. They each have different strengths. This will be a burgeoning field, especially as the collaborative, cost-conscious and patient-centered policies of health care reform start to become reality.
  • We think mostly about marketing/PR/Outreach: Reaching the general public. Is a way to cast a wide net. Not much in Sales (Physician or professional referrers). Social workers maybe Fund-raising, promoting an event. Absolutely
  • [Library] Other information and referral groups can post announcements on their blogs about presentations you will be doing in the community
  • [Volunteer] Volunteer Center or United Way can post when you are recruiting and have a new training session coming up.
  • [Huffington] Can get a well read blogger to write about you, or your issue, e.g, the Huffington Post has millions of readers
  • [BlogRally] Band together with a group of bloggers to blitz the blogosphere about an issue. “Engage with Grace” had 100 bloggers around the country at Thanksgiving promoting this “One Slide” campaign of having families bring up 5 questions pertaining to end-of-life wishes.
  • The philosophy of Web 2.0 is to get others to be excited about you and pass the word.That “marketing with”. It’s also to get your name and links to your site (blog or company site) out there on the Internet. The more incoming links, the higher your ranking in the search engines. Getting others to blog about you, with links to your site is good. Good to return the favor. Many blogs have a “blogroll” section, or a “Links” section where you can note people you think are especially worth following. You can also comment on other blogs. Many comment fields have a way to leave a link to your site. Don’t do this gratuitously. Try to engage the material and generate conversation. Best to be on target and then casually note your URL.
  • Most familiar. Can get started very quickly with very little money or time invested up front. Gives you strong SEO.
  • Many of the same disadvantages of any of the other Web 2.0 medium.
  • Can be done by the same person, or a group. Nice to have at least one other to bounce ideas off of Should be paid work Some (authoring, monitoring, responding) can be outsourced Pay by the hour (have a budget) or by the piece
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • Begin with this meaningless tweet… the “what you’re eating for breakfast” tweet, complete with a link to a picture of this breakfast. Address some of the perceptions/ resistance to twitter: From a pastoral blog, the top 10 reasons people don’t use social media . . . we'll leave people behind who don't use it. . . . there is no measurable result or return. . . . its output is untrustworthy. . . . we don't know how to do it; . . . our folks aren't using it; . . . it's all narcissistic; . . . it's a fad; . . . it's unproductive and not a good use of time; . . . we are uncomfortable with issues "transparency" and privacy; . . . it cannot replace face-to-face and personal relationships; (http://www.reyes-chow.com/2009/08/church-social-media.html )
  • Share examples of extraordinary tweets: 7.8 magnitude earthquake in China Plane landing on the Hudson Ice on Mars The Iranian resistance These are the very big and very rare examples we think of when trying to grasp the power of this medium.
  • How about on the individual level? Demi Moore received a tweet that appeared to be a person about to commit suicide. She retweeted, and it was picked up by followers, and the person’s location was ascertained. Police were dispatched and the person was taken to a crisis center and received psychiatric care. What about our patients and families? Post re: grandmother’s death located 2/1/10.
  • What is twitter? Where did if come from?
  • comScore Media Metrix press release, April 7, 2009. Retrieved from emarketer.com. Twitter is used by more older young adults than their young-young adult counterparts. Over 2009, we saw Twitter grow from being a repository for millions of individual moments/experiences (“What are you doing right now?”) to being embraced by the media, employers and the business community as a new way of accelerating the dissemination of content. For this reason, Twitter has developed a more professional audience/user population than other social media tools.
  • Perhaps I should reformat this as a table, by the person/department that would be responsible, and what each may use it for…??? Personal updates: Conversations/live feeds: Find example Links: Advertising/fundraising Job posting/Recruitment
  • Citation: Crowd Science “Social Media Insights: Twitter” 9/4/2009. Retrieved from emarketer.com. Because of the spread of smart phones, and Twitter’s simple use and compatibility with SMS text messaging, it has dramatically shifted the penetration of social media into our everyday lives. Whereas before, social media was relegated to the computer, we now find it everywhere that we can take our phone… i.e., everywhere.
  • Example of running a contest: Columbus Ballet ran a Valentine’s benefit asking for worst V-Day stories via tweet, and rewarded the best with tickets. For hospice, could look for best ACP stories for Healthcare Decisions Day, or award the person generating most retweets re: Healthcare Decisions Day, ACP awareness
  • Example of Save Ohio Libraries campaign: informally organized, picked up by celebrity blogs, composed of traditional and new media elements, grew beyond control of the initiators Rep. Ted Celeste reported 14,000 messages in a 12 hour period Governor’s office: 13,360 messages over Fri-Tues span, 10,783 on other issues over few preceding weeks
  • Remove this slide, I assume? I would of course want to mention #rankings and retweets, which are both specific to twitter
  • Insert examples: Hospice of the Western Reserve: using twitter for disseminating hospice stories, consumer interest/outreach Hospice of Dayton: used principally for recruiting.
  • It is simple to join, maintain, requires almost no investment— Because of its immediacy and ease, Twitter creates a sense of casualness and can feel conversational, leading users to over-share or After all, it’s 140 characters. How much harm can you do in 140 characters?
  • An example of twitter at its best: the example of LaylaGrace, a girl dying from a brain cancer Incredibly relevant, highly interactive, engaging, organizing a community of supporters around something meaningful
  • If you search #LaylaGrace, you find individuals selling products to benefit this girl’s family, that there are thousands of individuals sending thoughts and prayers. While many families would not choose to go through this journey so publicly, but for those who decide to, how much support can be generated by well wishes, thoughts, prayers, etc. ?
  • Example of Twitter at its worst, i.e., most dangerous INSERT CITATION Yes, Henry Wiggenbottom is a fabrication, but this example is not too far from the truth. While researching this topic, I came to a person’s twitter account, which linked to her myspace account containing all of the following information: the person’s name, marriage status, husband’s name and years married, her job, place of work, schools where she studied, city location, picture, children’s names and ages, colleges her children attend and their majors, income range, pets, interests, etc. And, her father just entered hospice.
  • Just a quick demonstration that yes, people do liberally share their travel plans…
  • This is a little closer to home: examples of people candidly and casually sharing major loss experiences. While we may not be using this technology, our patients and families absolutely are.
  • As well as our staff! This shows why it is so important to have a social media policy, whether or not you decide to have a ‘presence’ on any of the online social networks/ tools
  • Should I cover this? I think that these will be pretty common across all of the tools/media. What do you guys think?
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • Chen was the programmer of the bunch working with Adobe’s Flash to develop the language to stream clips in a web browser Hurley
  • Not surprisingly that YouTube is replacing traditional television viewing for many users.
  • All ages are using YouTube. As suspected, the 18-24 population has a larger representation, next surprisingly is the 65+ group. Evenly divided between males and females Average age range 18-55 51% of users visit YouTube weekly 52% of 18-34 year-olds share videos An average YouTube viewer spends 164 minutes online everyday vs. the 130 minutes per day watching traditional television.
  • All ages are using YouTube. As suspected, the 18-24 population has a larger representation, next surprisingly is the 65+ group. Evenly divided between males and females Average age range 18-55 51% of users visit YouTube weekly 52% of 18-34 year-olds share videos An average YouTube viewer spends 164 minutes online everyday vs. the 130 minutes per day watching traditional television.
  • Posting a video can pretty much take a life of its own.
  • Brand Awareness – Videos push your hospice’s brand, often in the same fashion used in traditional television or print advertising A study showed that online viewing led to 82% brand awareness and 18% product recall for similar television ads. Product Advertising – instead of overall brand awareness, this is individual products or services your hospice may offer Retail Promotion – Best practice: highlight individual departments or services within your store/hospice. Great to use in order to help with fundraising events Product Support – Use to support existing customers; consider some of the most common problems and questions about hospice services and create videos addressing those services Product Training – If you have products that your customers use (i.e. mechanical bed for home hospice patients) create a series of short training videos. Save money and time, you can create an archive of product information that anyone can access at any time. Recruiting – Company welcome video for your hospice. Create series of videos introducing individual departments. Illustrate company values, mission, services offered and facilities available.
  • Inform – Equivalent of an infomercial; shows the viewer how to do something useful, functions as a teaser for additional products and services you offer. Use to EDUCATE viewers. Educate – How-to video; offer useful information that viewers can share with their networks Entertain -
  • Everything must work together. Need assessment of your patients and families
  • Repurposed Commercials – Use the same 30-second spot you run on television < Not recommended but a good start; Consider re-edit for YouTube > Customer Testimonials – Several on YouTube by hospices using testimonials from existing staff and hospice patient families Company Introductions – Video tour of hospice facilities Expert Presentation – Help establish your professional credentials and burnish your hospice’s image as the leader in your industry or area.
  • [Hospice of the Bluegrass] Basic Channel view Info Comments Favorite Share Playlist Flag Uploads
  • [Hospice Advantage Services] Basic Video view: More common among users Info Comments Favorite Share Comments Playlist Flag Subscribe URL Embed More From: Your Channel Related Videos
  • [Hospice Advantage Services] Basic Video view: More common among users Info Comments Favorite Share Comments Playlist Flag Subscribe URL Embed More From: Your Channel Related Videos
  • [Hospice Advantage Services] Basic Video view: More common among users Info Comments Favorite Share Comments Playlist Flag Subscribe URL Embed More From: Your Channel Related Videos
  • [Hospice Advantage Services] Basic Video view: More common among users Info Comments Favorite Share Comments Playlist Flag Subscribe URL Embed More From: Your Channel Related Videos
  • Passive use example
  • Social Media Policies Any new technology brings new issues. Mercurial world of bits and bytes, plus the user-generated content, many surprising perspectives to consider. Already covered HIPAA concerns in terms of what you can post and how to be as protective as possible of confidentiality in your published policies to participants.
  • This is a strategic decision. Will differ by the medium and the audience. Your chance to project a personality for your business (or a part of your business). What do you want it to be? Want to have a broad enough range of topics, but not so broad as to lose the interest of your participants. Think in terms of keywords or categories and rotate through them. What might people be searching for? What is of interest for your fans? If trying to reach younger employees, will be talking about working conditions and the rewards If trying to build excitement about fundraising event, say a Run to Remember, talk about races, marathons, memorials… Things that might attract people involved on that level. If trying to reach family caregivers, certainly stress, finances, specific symptoms and diseases How personal do you want to get. If you have a charismatic leader, or blogger, this is a chance to let that personality shine. There’s a hospice that has an incredible writer whose prose would bring people on the listserve to tears, he could capture the tenderness of the moment in such a compelling way. But what if he leaves, gets discredited… Some have multiple authors, both to spread the load and create a range of personalities. Not super personal, like what you had for breakfast. But a peak behind the curtains is often expected, and welcome. “A day in the life of…” Forbidden topics: Stories, photos, videos about clients unless you have permission and release Language Physician-assisted suicide Trade secrets, proprietary information Opinions/controversy/libel (Electronic Frontier Foundation: bloggers liability issues)
  • Should have a single coordinator in house, but can have many authoring arrangements Whoever you choose must to author: Be able to write well for he medium, produce easily and on time. (Good for the long haul) Judgment you trust within guidelines you have provided Pay for the output (per post?) Make sure it’s valued, not just heaped on an already full plate. Outsourced (PR or journalist background) Advantages: More objective, would not get defensive, used to writing for others Disadvantages: May not know company culture or see land mines on the horizon Disclaimer: Postings are not necessarily reflective of the company’s views Vetting process: Nice to have a committee the Coordinator can turn to when in doubt. Especially when responding to negative or incendiary comments, or a contribution that seems dicey in some way. Needs to be a quick process. Some options: - Note at the top any 3 rd party materials and any links - Checklist about releases for stories, photos, videos Whose baby is this? Development? HR? Volunteers? Marketing? Should legal see everything? Proofing: Try not to have poor grammar. Misspellings now and then are forgiven, but is always better to have someone proof ahead of time. Fresh eyes. Credibility issue. Time limits: Social Media can suck your time up like nothing else. Relationship oriented. Very compelling. Does require frequent monitoring/responding Set a budget of time (X min/day)
  • Huge topic. Recommend Electronic Frontier Foundation: www.eff.org Rules of thumb: Obviously releases for the use of identifiers (HIPAA) but even of volunteers or others So much of the Internet and Social Media is about making connections, that linking is encouraged. If you give credit (that transparency) and link to the author or original source, you cover a lot of ground there. Can always ask persmission. Will often be flattered, welcome the link, and may in fact start a networking relationship with you! General guidelines based on “Fair Use” The less you quote directly the better (2-4 sentences rather than a whole page) Is your use in any way stealing their thunder? Could you be construed to be the author and therefore benefit from the work? More favorable if you take the work and change/add something to it (commentary, small corner of the graphic…) Becomes a creative work of your own. “Transformative use” Government materials are public domain. Our taxes paid for it. Anyone can re-publish.
  • Do you really control your brand? Do you Google your business regularly, or have Google alerts set up to be notified when your company is mentioned somewhere else? What about searching blogs? Facebook? Twitter? With user-generated content, all kinds of people can be saying things about you and you don’t even know about it. Not to scare you, but you may want to start paying attention. If someone posts something on your Social Media site, it’s a great opportunity for you to respond to the issue and give it the perspective you want to have shared: Honesty and transparency. Can have an inclusion policy that will cover you ethically if you decide to delete, or not publish a post. Monitoring often will give you the shortest turn around and most notice so you can respond quickly Only on a blog can you hold a post before it’s published. Best to publish it with most of the flavor the person included, but post your response at the same time. Part of establishing a Social Media presence is setting up a response process. Perhaps all negatives go to Marketing, the CEO, a committee…Who vets the response? Grace, empathy, non-defensive. This is the human side. Authentic responses are expected, as is accountability. If there is something to apologize for, apologize. Can even ask for feedback about ways you might have handled the situation better…Great customer/community research vehicle. Can even thank people for helping to make you the truly responsive organization you wish to be.
  • Do you encourage employees to be part of the community, spark conversation, etc.? Official authors, vs. commenters. Fantastic way to harness enthusiasm, including on their personal networks. “ The disclaimer”: About personal views not necessarily the views of the company Balancing act between their freedom and a code of conduct as an employee. Remember too, young adults donot have a completely mature pre-frontal cortext until 25 years old. At same time, want to capture that enthusiasm. Guidelines help. ;-) Recommend Social Fish Employee policy Guidelines: www.socialfish.org)
  • Imagine when telephones first came out. The hoopla around that was full of all kinds of fear and distrust. This is an evolving media. Ithas so much potential, even to the point of possibly being a way we actually deliver care in the future. Policies should be friendly and educational. Encourage things to do as well as things to avoid. Should have accountability and a fair process for addressing consequences of an infraction. Consider talking to your liability insurance folks about your participation and finding out what coverage, if any, you need. Best to make friends with it and be part of shaping the conversation. (The conversation may be going on without you, which might be even worse!)

Social Media and Hospice Social Media and Hospice Presentation Transcript

  • Social Media and Hospice: Effective Use of Facebook, Twitter, You Tube and Blogging Tasha Beauchamp,MSc David Cherry Webmaster, Research Scientist Marketing Coordinator Elder Pages Online NHPCO Liza Paul, MSSA, LSW Susan Wallace, MSW, LSW Social Worker Policy Analyst The Mount Carmel Hospice Ohio Hospice & PC Org NHPCO MLC Conference - April 21, 2010 - Washington, DC
  • Today’s Agenda Using social media to reach consumers
    • Introduction to Social Media: Tasha
    • Facebook: Liza
    • HIPAA: Tasha
    • Break
    • 4. Blogging: Tasha
    • 5. Twitter: Susan
    • 6. YouTube: David
    • 7. Policy concerns: Tasha
  • Uses for Social Media
    • Marketing/Sales
    • PR/Outreach
    • Fundraising
    • Advocacy
    • Human Resources
    • Volunteers
    • Clinical (patient/family/provider communication, if protected)
  • Match the Media with the Audience
  • Social Networking as a Media Purchase
    • What are you wanting to achieve?
      • Which departments are involved?
    • Is your demographic there?
    • How will you know you have succeeded?
      • Measurement & evaluation
    • What are the pros/cons?
    • How to get started?
    • Any legal concerns?
  • Poll: What do you do on the Net now?
    • ___ Have a business website
    • ___ Publish an e-newsletter
    • ___ Participate in a professional email listserve
    • ___ Participate on my.nhpco.org
    • ___ Have a blog for your business
    • ___ Have Facebook presence for your business
    • ___ Have a personal Facebook presence
    • ___ Follow or post on Twitter
  • Advantages of the Internet
    • Multiple media
    • Interactivity
    • “Search-ability”
    • Pre-qualified audience!
    • 24/7 accessibility
    • Easy/inexpensive to update/disseminate
    • Observe & create community
  • Uni-directional Communication: Broadcast and “Brochure-ware”
    • Text & Graphics
    • Video
    • Animation
    • Music
  • Bi-directional Communication : Building relationships one at a time, Web 1.0
    • Interactivity!
    • Ask for input via
      • Email links
      • Forms
      • Polls & Surveys
    • Is the “call to action”
      • Online donations
      • Online referrals
      • Subscribe to e-newsletter
  • Multi-directional Communication : Social Networking, Web 2.0
    • List-serve: Email messages
    • YouTube: Videos
    • Flickr: Photos
    • Blogs: Commentary
    • Twitter: Micro-blogging
    • Facebook: You!
  • Multi-directional Communication : Characteristics of Social Networking
    • User-generated content
    • Many-to-many: “viral”
    • Democratization
    • Community
    • “ Marketing with”
    • Honest relationship
    • Transparency
    • Highly engaged
  • Blogging
    • Sharing your commentary
  • Blogging with words
  • Blogging with pictures
  • Blogging with video
  • What is a blog? A “web log”
    • Like a public diary online
    • Frequent short entries
    • Can be educational or opinion
    • Can include words, photos, videos
    • High personality quotient
    • Invites comments
  • Twitter
    • Sharing your
    • micro-commentary
  • Tweet to make announcements Posts my followers see
  • Use Twitter to learn from Thought Leaders Postings of people I follow
  • What is Twitter? Digital Haiku in the “Super Now”
    • Like a blog but limited to 140 characters
    • Often entered via cell phone (texting)
    • Made up of “tweeters” & “followers”
    • Very much in the moment
    • Way to follow thought leaders
    • Way to announce events
    • Way to get others to promote you
  • YouTube
    • Sharing your videos
  • Describe your services
  • Tell a story
  • Educate the community
  • Recruit Volunteers
  • Encourage job applicants
  • What is YouTube? Easy way to serve your video
    • Store your videos on YouTube
    • Take advantage of YouTube search
    • Can have YouTube “serve” your videos
    • Have links to your website on YouTube
  • Facebook
    • Sharing YOU!
  • Give basic information
  • Offer photo albums
  • Talk about what’s going on
  • Let others rave about you
  • What is Facebook? Your business’ social webpage
    • Scrapbook of your business
    • Collect Fans (customers)
    • Post on your Wall about
      • Announcements of events
      • Topics of interest to fans/customers
      • The inner workings of your business
    • Respond to posts on your Wall
    • This is a conversation
  • Demographics Is your audience there?
  • What are older adults are doing online?
    • Of persons age 45-54 55-63 64-72
    • Use the Internet 79% 70% 56%
    • Get health info 74% 81% 70%
    • Use email 90% 90% 91%
    • Watch videos 49% 30% 24%
    • Read blogs 27% 25% 23%
    • Use social ntwrk 20% 9% 11%
    January 2009 Pew Internet & American Life, www.pewinternet.org
  • What are younger “netizens” doing online?
    • Of persons age 12-17 18-32 33-44
    • Use the Internet 93% 87% 82%
    • Get health info 28% 68% 82%
    • Use email 73% 94% 93%
    • Watch videos 57% 72% 57%
    • Read blogs 49% 43% 34%
    • Use social ntwrk 65% 67% 36%
    January 2009 Pew Internet & American Life, www.pewinternet.org
  • Why all the fuss? Increasing your Internet presence
  • Reasons to Consider Social Media Most visited websites
    • #1 – Google (43% of global users visited that day)
    • #2 – Facebook (30%)
    • #3 – Yahoo! (27%)
    • #4 – YouTube (23%)
    • #10 – Blogger.com (Blogging service) (12%)
    • #13 – Twitter (5%)
    • #20 – WordPress.com (Blogging service) (5%)
    Alexa.com, Free web traffic metrics, stats on 1/23/10
  • How people get to your website “Inbound marketing”
  • Measuring success: What is your goal/objective?
    • Increased traffic to your website
      • By traffic source
    • Improved outcomes
      • Increased referrals (online?)
      • Increased donations (online?)
      • Increased applications (online?)
      • Increased phone calls
      • Increased press coverage…
  • Measuring a sphere with a yardstick
    • How to measure community?
      • Number and type of viewers
      • Time spent on the page
      • # of comments/exchanges
      • # of forwards
      • # to links to you by others
    • Amount of insight about audience
    • Feedback
    • Damage control
  • How to Get Started
    • Observe
    • Determine a strategy
      • Identify a purpose, goals, objectives
      • Identify target audience
      • Identify appropriate tool(s)
    • Identify a Coordinator and budget
    • Create Policies
    • Create a profile with cross-linking to your website
    • Start posting and conversing
  • Questions?
    • Tasha Beauchamp, MSc
    • 707-477-0700 (Pacific)
    • [email_address]
  • Facebook Liza Paul, MSSA, LSW The Mount Carmel Hospice
  • What is facebook?
  • What is facebook?
    • By utilizing facebook for your business you have many opportunities, such as:
      • Develop an online community for your business.
      • You can provide information to your current and potential customers.
  • Patterns of Use:
    • The fastest growing demographic of facebook is 35 and older
    • Average user has 130 friends.
    • More than 8 billion minutes are used on facebook every day.
    • More than 20 million(Mar 2010) users become fan of pages every day.
  • Gender Patterns of Communication
    • Traditionally men are early adopters of new technology.
    • Women tend to use Social Media more than men because they are more relationship driven.
    • Men are more transactional.
    • You will find a higher percentage of men on LinkedIn than on Facebook.
  • Uses for Facebook
  • Personal Profile
  • Fan Page
  • Information
  • Pictures
  • Fan Page cont. Notes
  • Facebook and Fund-raising
    • Pay pal is NOT available through facebook.
    • Your donor has the options of sharing their personal information with you but it is not mandatory.
    • Have to consider the staff time, monitoring and updating the content.
  • Two Options for your hospice
    • Fan Page
    • Group Page
    • Better for long-term relationship with your fans, readers or customers.
    • Visible to non-facebook users.
    • The content from the page itself doesn’t have to be linked to a profile.
    • Host application for credit cards.
    • Better for branding.
    • Don’t need personal profile.
    Greenstein, H. & Smarty, A.(2008-2009)
    • Better for quick discussions and attention.
    • Open or close invite to the group.
    • Have more control of the content.
    • Better for organizing in a smaller scale.
    • No statistics regarding visitors.
    • You can send out a bulk invite to less than 5,000 members.
    • Better for Viral Marketing.
    • Any member can bulk invite to the group.
  • pictures taken from Google images
  • Benefits / Liabilities
    • Great Source for Brand Awareness
    • Customer Engagement
    • Reputation Management
    • Feedback Mechanism
    • The Viral Effect
  • Were do I start?
    • Add the “find us on FB” on your company’s website.
    • Email your loyal customers outside of facebook and ask them to become your fan.
    • Update your content frequently with photos, videos, blogs.
    • Post any event that your company is having.
    • Engage with fans that comment on your page.
    • You can also buy a Facebook Ad.
  • What others can do
    • Become your fan.
    • They can list you as their Cause.
    • Solicit donations on your behalf.
    • Put your events in their calendars.
    • Talk about you in their profiles.
    • Engage with each other on your page.
  • Campaign Objectives and Means to Measure Efficacy
    • Actively
      • gather fans
      • generate “buzz”
      • build relations
      • paving the way for the future in communication
    • Passively
      • gather information about others.
      • Find out what works and what doesn’t.
  • Indicators
    • Direct:
      • Donation increase
      • Trace referral through facebook
      • Retrieve any information that you want.
    • Page manager:
      • Gives you analytics
      • New and removed fans
      • Wall post and review
      • Photo view
      • Demographics
      • Trends over time
  •  
  • HIPAA Concerns Tasha Beauchamp, MSc Elder Pages Online
  • We are not lawyers!
    • Abril & Cava (2008). Health privacy in a techno-social world: A cyber-patient’s Bill of Rights. Northwestern Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property, 6 (3), pp. 244 – 276
    • Conversations with Health IT folks
    • Looking at existing social media sites
    • Looking at policies of others
    • “ An online fool
    • and his privacy
    • are soon parted.”
  • Is this a HIPAA violation? Are you responsible?
    • Your Facebook page is geared toward fund-raising, but a Fan posts a personal story?
    • In a Twitter feed, an employee aludes to a poignant interchange at a funeral, mentioning the church where it occurred?
    • You post a video on YouTube of a patient talking about their hospice experience?
    • Someone comments on your blog asking medical advice about her father’s condition?
  • Who owns the data? Who is responsible?
    • Individual profile (not a covered entity)
    • Hosting service?
      • Facebook, Twitter, YouTube (not a covered entity)
      • Hospital network (covered entity)
    • Facebook Fan Page of a covered entity (???)
    • Facebook Group of a covered entity (???)
      • Can have membership agreements
      • Can make the group “secret”
  • What you publish
    • Guidelines for staff
      • What constitutes PHI
      • Need for releases
    • Vetting procedure
      • Share responsibility
    • Employee disclaimer
      • “ This is my opinion and not necessarily the opinion of ****, my employer.”
  • Comments left by visitors Self-disclosure
    • Self-disclosure is generally patient’s responsibility
      • What if family member posts?
    • Legal vs. ethical responsibility
      • Who owns the data?
    • Terms of use or Inclusion/deletion policy
  • Post warnings Drawing upon contract law
    • Terms of use
      • Describe the kinds of posts you will delete
      • Prohibit disclosure of personal health information
      • Clarify ownership/accountability of information posted by others
    • Privacy policies
      • What you do and don’t do with their information
      • What you do and don’t control
    • Disclaimers
      • Postings of the staff do not necessarily reflect the views of the company
  • Staff personal postings Thin line between personal and professional
    • Was Debbie okay with this post?
    • Even if you don’t play in Web 2.0, your staff does
    • Need a policy that clarifies
      • What they can/can’t say about patients’ PHI
      • Any disclaimers
  • Social Media is here to stay
    • Social support & improved outcomes
    • Freedom from geographic limitations
    • Convenience of 24/7 access
    • People are using it already
  • Companies already participating in Web 2.0
    • Mayo Clinic
    • Children’s Hospital of LA
    • Cigna Health Insurance
    • Cleveland Clinic
    • Alive Hospice
    • Hospice Buffalo
    • Hospice and Palliative CareCenter
  • Create policies
    • Who can post
    • What can be posted
      • By staff
      • By visitors
    • Needed permissions
    • Vetting process
    • Physical protections
    • Legal counsel
  • Choose your technology wisely
    • Host community on your secure server
    • Choose only to blog
      • Can review comments before posting
    • Set alerts and monitor often
      • Promptly delete inappropriate posts
  • Questions?
    • Tasha Beauchamp, MSc
    • 707-477-0700 (Pacific)
    • [email_address]
  • Blogging Sharing your commentary Tasha Beauchamp, MSc Elder Pages Online
  • Who is reading blogs?
    • 32% of all online adults
    • 12-17 year olds (49%)
    • 18 - 32 year olds (43%)
    • 33 - 44 year olds (34%)
    • 45 - 54 year olds (27%)
    • 55 – 63 year olds (25%)
    • 64 - 72 year olds (23%)
    • 73+ year olds (15%)
    January 2009 Pew Internet & American Life, www.pewinternet.org
  • Anatomy of a Blog The Basics Date Title of entry Ability to Subscribe Categories (Keywords) Blogroll (Links) Author
  • Anatomy of a Blog Provide author bios
  • How people interact with you Facilitate Comments
  • How people interact with you A comment string
  • Anatomy of a Blog Making a Blog Post
  • Active use of a blog For Community Education
  • Active use of a blog For Family Caregiver Education
  • Active use of a blog For Public Relations
  • Active use of a blog Responding to News
  • Active use of a blog Promoting fundraising events
  • Active use of a blog For Advocacy: Rate Cuts and Reform
  • Active use of a blog Volunteer Recruitment
  • Active use of a blog Employee Recruitment
  • Active use of a blog Communicating privately with families
  • Active use of a blog Private Blogs: HIPAA!
  • Private Blogs
    • Blogging between family & provider
    • HIPAA requirements
      • Password protected
      • On a secure server
      • Encrypted
    • Examples
      • RemCare ( www.myremcare.com )
      • Connect4Healthcare ( www.connect4healthcare.com )
  • Ways to use a blog actively Examples by Department
    • Marketing/PR/Outreach:
      • Family caregiver education
      • Announcing presentations
      • Responding to current events
    • Fund-raising
      • Promoting events
      • Telling stories
      • Online donation button
    • Advocacy
      • Calls to action
  • Ways to use a blog actively Examples by Department
    • HR/Volunteer Recruitment:
      • Describe different programs
      • A day-in-the-life…
    • Patient/provider communication
      • “ Private” blogs
      • VERY special services
      • HIPAA!!!
  • Ways to work with the blogs of others Announcing Events
  • Ways to work with the blogs of others Volunteer Recruitment
  • Ways to work with the blogs of others “Blog-raising” with influential bloggers
  • Ways to work with the blogs of others “Blog rallies” working with many bloggers
  • Ways to work with the blogs of others “Marketing with”
    • Making announcements
      • Presentations or fund-raising events
      • Volunteer training
    • Telling a story
    • “ Blog-raising”
    • “ Blog rallies”
    • Comment on other people’s blogs
    • Reciprocal linking
  • Advantages of a Blog
    • “Simplest” Web 2.0 tool
    • Add content regularly (currency & relevance)
    • Others will link to you (credibility)
    • You can link to you (credibility)
    • Repeated exposure to your brand
    • More control than other Web 2.0 tools
  • Disadvantages of a Blog
    • Time consuming (Ready for a puppy?)
      • Must post often
      • Must monitor daily
    • Less control than other mainstream media
      • Negative comments (but can hold them)
      • Inappropriate postings
    • Is this your demographic?
    • Need strategy & policies
  • Getting started Skills, Time and Money
    • Skills needed
      • Constructing the site (technology)
      • Some legal advice (policies)
      • Writing ability (style and productivity)
    • Time required
      • 10 – 60 hours to set up
      • 1 hour per post, plus monitoring/responding
    • Money
      • Can do yourself, no charge
      • $500 - $2500 for expert assistance
  • Blog Jobs
    • Coordination (“Blogmaster”)
      • Set up (tech, strategy, policy)
      • Planning content
      • Managing content (timelines)
      • Implementing policy
    • Authoring
    • Monitoring
    • Responding
    • Vetting (committee)
  • Questions?
    • Tasha Beauchamp, MSc
    • 707-477-0700 (Pacific)
    • [email_address]
  • Twitter What can you really say in 140 characters? Susan Wallace, MSW, LSW Midwest Center for Home, Hospice & Palliative Care Education
  • When you first heard about twitter, what did you think of?
  • What can you say in 140 characters?
    • Social networking and micro- blogging service
    • Users send tweets, text-based posts of up to 140  characters
      • displayed on the profile page
      • delivered to the author's followers .
    • The 140 character limit set for compatibility with SMS messaging
    • shorthand notation and slang
    • URL shortening services such as tinyurl, bit.ly and tr.im
    Twitter
  • Who you’re following Your Twitter ID Feed Direct messages Status Updates Search function Lists Who’s following you
  • Demographics
    • Users more likely to be:
    • Female
    • Lower income (<$60,000)
    • Higher education levels
    • Caucasian
    • Childless
    • (Corbett, 2009 Twitter Demographics and Statistics Report)
    • Post …
    • Personal updates
    • Conversations / Live Feeds
      • Hashtag (#)
      • ‘ At’ symbol (@)
    • Links
      • WebPages
      • Articles
      • Photos
      • Videos
    • Advertising/fundraising
    • Job postings/ recruitment
    • Find out…
    • what people are saying about hospice
    • what other hospices are doing
    • what the experts are thinking
    • what your patients may be saying
    • what your staff may be sharing
    Twitter: Key uses
  • The impact of Twitter
    • Smart phones
    • Text
    • Conversational
  • What can you do with Twitter?
    • Marketing: Self-promote, follow local referral sources, run a contest
    • PR/Outreach/Education: Share hospice stories, run a ‘hospice myths’ week
    Retrieved 3/5/10
  • What can you do with Twitter?
    • Fund-raising: Promote a fundraising event, raise awareness about how charitable donations are used, share a planned giving story
    Retrieved 3/5/10
  • What can you do with Twitter?
    • Advocacy: Raise awareness about funding cuts, link to legislator or campaign websites
    Retrieved 3/5/10
  • What can you do with Twitter?
    • Human Resources: Post job listings, link to staff stories/vignettes
    • Volunteers: Recruit volunteers, share volunteer stories
  • Is it tworth it?
    • Measurement dictated by goal
    Goal Measure Increase recruitment Job applicants citing twitter as ‘lead’ Community outreach Number of followers, number of non-industry followers, #ranking Explore/learn Time dedicated, resources utilized Advocacy Retweets, #ranking Fundraising Retweets, donors/participants citing twitter as ‘lead’
  • Example: Diane Meier
  • Example: Hospice of the Western Reserve
    • Other hashtags: #hcsm, #hospice, #NHPCO, #palliative, #homecare
  • What’s good about it, what’s bad about it
    • Twitter makes it extremely easy to create and disseminate information and news to your followers and beyond.
    • But…
    • Twitter makes it extremely easy to create and disseminate news and information to your followers and beyond.
  • Other Pros and Cons
    • Simple
    • Easy
    • Free
    • Text-compatible
    • Interacts with Facebook, other new media
    • Boosts traffic
    • Narcissistic
    • Can be irrelevant
    • Can be redundant
    • Time consuming
    • No tagging system
    • May informalize/ overexpose
    • Trouble ‘turning off’
  • Twitter at its best… Retrieved 2/26/10
  • Retrieved 3/5/10
  • Last 5 Tweets of Henry Wiggenbottom…
  • We’re not kidding… Retrieved 10/09 & 3/5/10
  • What this means for our hospice patients and families… Retrieved 2/26/10, 3/5/10
  • What this means for our staff… Retrieved 10/09
  • Logistical considerations
    • Cost: Free!
    • Time to set up account: 10-30 minutes
    • Time to develop policies, procedures, designate roles: 1 hour - months
    • Time to maintain feed: 10 minutes/day +
  • Broadcast Yourself David Cherry National Hospice & Palliative Care Organization
  • What is YouTube?
    • Founded on February 15, 2005 by three former PayPal employees
      • Chad Hurley
      • Steven Chen
      • Jawed Karim
    • Designed to be a service to facilitate the process of uploading, watching and sharing videos
    • Bought by Google in Oct. 2006 for a whopping $1.65 billion!
    • YouTube had 3 million visitors in their first month
    • 80 million visitors per month
    • Visitors watch more than 3 billion videos a month
    • Every minute there is 20 hours of video uploaded to YouTube
    How big is YouTube?
  • Where do I start?
    • Visit YouTube
      • Check out what other organizations are doing
      • Check out what your competitors are up too
    • Research the patterns of use
    • Determine how YouTube fits in your marketing mix
    • Determine what type of video you want to produce
    • Reserve equipment and editing software
  • Patterns of Use
  • Patterns of Use
  • Patterns of Use
    • Evenly divided between males and females
    • Average age range 18-55
    • 51% of users visit YouTube weekly
    • 52% of 18-34 year-olds share videos
    • An average YouTube viewer spends 164 minutes online everyday vs. the 130 minutes per day watching traditional television.
  • Is YouTube right for your company?
    • Consumers love to watch videos
    • The more interesting the video, the bigger the audience you can attract.
    • People like to be entertained, educated and informed.
    • The cost of posting a video to YouTube site is ZERO! Only cost is the expense of shooting and editing.
      • “ Fail, but fail FAST so you can move on to something that works faster!!!”
  • The good outweighs the bad … most of the time
    • Advantages
    • Brand Awareness
    • Product Advertising
    • Retail Promotion
    • Direct Sales
    • Product Support
    • Product Training
    • Employee Communications
    • Recruiting
    • FREE
    • Disadvantages
    • Time consuming
      • Taping
      • Editing
      • Monitoring/Responding
    • Production cost
    • Less control than other mainstream media
      • Negative comments
      • Inappropriate posting
  • What kind of videos should I produce?
    • Inform and Sell
    • Educate and Sell
    • Entertain and Sell
  • Determine how YouTube fits in your marketing plans
    • What is the purpose of your videos?
    • Who is your customer?
    • What does your customer want or need?
    • What are you promoting?
    • What is your message?
  • Departmental Uses
    • Marketing, PR and Outreach
    • Human Resources
    • Fundraising
    • Advocacy
  • Types of content to help your goals
    • Repurposed Commercials/PSA
    • Instructional Videos
    • Service Presentations and Demonstrations
    • Customer Testimonials
    • Company Introductions
    • Expert Presentations
  • Anatomy of YouTube The Basics: Channel View
  • Anatomy of YouTube The Basics: Video View
  • Anatomy of YouTube Advanced View
  • Anatomy of YouTube Advanced View
  • Anatomy of YouTube Advanced View
  • Get “Social” in Social Networking
    • Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you
    • Favorite videos
    • Add friends
    • Comment on videos
    • Rate Videos
    • Post interesting videos on your blog
    • And it shall be returned…
  • Get “Social” in Social Networking
  • Get “Social” in Social Networking
  • Get “Social” in Social Networking
  • Get “Social” in Social Networking
  • Tracking/Measuring
  • Tracking/Measuring
  • Social Media Policies Issues to Consider Tasha Beauchamp, MSc Elder Pages Online
  • Basic Policies to Have in Place
    • HIPAA (already dealt with)
    • What will and won’t be discussed
    • Who can publish/respond
    • Intellectual property & © on the Internet
    • How to handle negative comments
    • Employee personal use of social media
  • What will and won’t be discussed
    • Identify objectives, audience and tone
    • Topics you want to cover
      • Make a keyword list (search engines)
      • Use these as categories/guideposts
    • How personal do you want to get?
    • Any forbidden topics?
    • Libel and slander issues
  • Who can publish/respond
    • Establish a Coordinator to oversee
    • Cultivate author(s)
      • Include a disclaimer about personal views
    • Guidelines and/or vetting process
      • Proofing
      • Frequency of monitoring
      • Frequency of posting
    • Budget for time
  • Intellectual property and copyright Publishing the work of others
    • Releases for stories, photos, videos (HIPAA!)
    • Ask permission = Networking!
    • Link liberally and give credit
    • Could anyone mistake the work as yours?
    • Government materials are public domain
  • Handling negative comments
    • Do you really control your brand now?
    • Honesty and transparency
    • Can post an inclusion policy on your page
    • Monitor frequently
    • Only a blog can hold comments for review
    • Have a response process set up
    • Publish a response asap
    • Honestly acknowledge mistakes
  • Employee personal use of social media
    • Can employees comment on your blog?
      • Disclaimer about personal views
    • Can employees spend time on social media while at work?
    • What about employees’ personal pages?
      • Standards of conduct
      • Caution about venting about work
      • HIPAA & confidentiality
      • Disclaimer on their personal page
  • Policy Summary
    • Everything carries risk
    • Social media is here to stay
      • Opportunities for collaboration
      • Removes barriers to access
      • May facilitate delivery of care
    • Have a process for infractions
    • Address insurance coverage
    • Encourage/educate yet protect
  • Questions?
    • Tasha Beauchamp, MSc
    • 707-477-0700 (Pacific)
    • [email_address]