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Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
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Canada

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  • 1. Leslie Diaz Baeza
  • 2. History and origins <ul><li>Canadian English as a hybrid of British and American Englishes. It also has influence for french. </li></ul><ul><li>This variety of english is a product of four waves of immigrations, the most important ones: </li></ul><ul><li>The Loyalists form Northern America </li></ul><ul><li>From Britain and Ireland </li></ul><ul><li>From france </li></ul>
  • 3.  
  • 4. Spelling… <ul><li>Canadian English combines both American and British rules… </li></ul><ul><li>In some French-derived words, Canadian English retains the British Spelling </li></ul><ul><li>Color-Honour-centre </li></ul><ul><li>In oder cases both Canadian and American English differ form British, in spelling words such as Tire and Curve </li></ul>
  • 5. <ul><li>Canadian English retains the practice of British English of doubling consonant when adding suffixes to words even when the syllable is not estressed: </li></ul><ul><li>Travelled / Traveled </li></ul>
  • 6. Phonemic Incidence <ul><li>Words of french origin, such as Corissant or niche are pronounced as they would be in french, so: /kɹəˈsɒn(t)/ /niʃ/ </li></ul><ul><li>Words such as adult-composite and proyect are given emphasis on the first syllable as in Britain. </li></ul><ul><li>lever /ˈlivə/ - either and neither are more commonly /ˈaɪðər/ and /ˈnaɪðər/ </li></ul>
  • 7. Regional Variations
  • 8. <ul><li>Western and Central Dialects </li></ul><ul><li>As in North American English, these regions are characterized by the Rothic accent. </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian Rising </li></ul><ul><li>It is the most relevant feature of Canadian English, Here the dipthongs /aɪ/ and /aʊ/ are &quot;raised&quot; before the voiced consonants; /p/ /t/ </li></ul><ul><li>/k/ and /f/ as in writer </li></ul>
  • 9. The low-black merger and the Canadian shift <ul><li>This first term consists on th complete merger of the vowel /ɔ/ and /ɑ/ by [ɒ](Caught and cot respectively) </li></ul><ul><li>Resulting from this merger and the space in articulation that it leaves a low-front vowel is /æ/ is retracted to a low-central articulation. The result is the ultilization of the same vowel to words such as; stack and </li></ul><ul><li>stock. </li></ul>
  • 10. <ul><li>Thank you!!! </li></ul>
  • 11. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fq6yMuqXWdc&feature=related

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