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Why do we drive on the left
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Why do we drive on the left

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This is my first presentation to be recorded in Camtasia. I am doing something trivial but interesting for people.

This is my first presentation to be recorded in Camtasia. I am doing something trivial but interesting for people.


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  • 1. 7060QCA Digital Design Objects Master of Digital Design Queensland College of Art Griffith University Lecturer: David Keane Student Name: Nastiti Mayawulan Student Number: S2822152
  • 2. “Road” is a picture taken by Peter Mazurek. Royalty-free with stardard restriction as stated in stock.xcgh.hu (www.sxc.hu) terms and conditions.Retrieved from www.sxc.hu on 8th March 2012 at 07.40 am“Drive on Left” sign is a picture taken by Mat Connolley. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribute Share-alike 3.0 with permission to shareand adapt the work. Retrieved from wikipedia.org on 8th March 2012 at 10.00 am
  • 3. Different country, different rules • Most of the countries in the world drive on the right (the driver is on the left) • Others, including Australia, drives on the left (the driver is on the right)“World map” is a picture taken by Robert Proksa. Royalty-free with stardard restriction as stated in stock.xcgh.hu (www.sxc.hu) terms andconditions. Retrieved from www.sxc.hu on 6th March 2012 at 08.00 am. Modified by Nastiti Mayawulan
  • 4. Traffic in the early years• Initially, the traffic was on the left.• The reason: right-handed trait  70-90% people of the world is right-handed (Scientific American magazine, November 1, 2001)
  • 5. Traffic in the early years• Initially, the traffic was on the left.
  • 6. 27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution• United States, after gaining their independence, followed the idea.
  • 7. 27 BC Middle Ages (5th -15th century)• Evidence: old Ages, horsemen tend to be on the In the Middle Roman quarry tracks at Blunsdon Ridge, found by Bryn Walters in hold left so if they met an acquintance, they can 1998  dated back to 27 BC. The ruts on the the reins in their left hand and shook hands left side isright. If it was than the right side  with their more shallow an unfriendly Romans drove left. drew their sword. counterpart, they can
  • 8. Dawn of the right27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution • The usage of large wagon pulled by several sets of horses in 1700 by people in France and United States. • No driver seat, so the driver would ride the horse on the left rear to control the horses and keep an eye on people travelling on foot on his left  he kept the right side of the road.
  • 9. French Revolution and its impact27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution• Prior to the Revolution, the aristocrats took left for travelling, forcing the peasants to take right for their course. But after the Revolution, the aristocrats wanted to keep it humble and join the common people travelling on the right.
  • 10. Napoleon’s influence27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution• Napoleon imposed on driving right to the country and the majority of European mainland countries he overtook  the French, Spanish and Portugese colonies in the different parts of the world were also taking right-side driving.
  • 11. 27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution• United States, after gaining their independence, followed the idea.• Canadians used to drive on BOTH sides (teritories that were under French control were driving on the right whilst the British ones were driving on the left). In 1920s they were all switched to the right-side driving.
  • 12. British resistence27 BC Middle Ages 18th century; (5th -15th French century) Revolution • Great Britain maintaining the driving on the left  big wagons did not fit and never been ruled by France. Therefore, British colonies such as India, sub-Sahara African countries, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia and New Zealand drive left.
  • 13. What happen with Asian countries? • Japan is left-sided toright because China drives on the drive in mid Korea was known because left in 1800s, Gunboat diplomacy forced 1100 B.C, as beingfrom Japanese it has been passed switched the Japanese to open their ports in from left-side to rightinfluence to colonial to American in 1946 the British World War II. since it hasand Sir relationship the end of closer Rutherford Alcock persuadedBritishto adopt with US than the them so they the keep-left rule. In 1924 the keep- can imported American cars. left driving was legalised.“Japan flag icon”, “China flag icon”, “Korea flag icon” are made by Nastiti Mayawulan
  • 14. What happen with Asian countries? • Indonesia was introduced to left- Thailand, a country which side driving by the Dutch during never experienced their colonialism in 17th century. colonialism also drives on But left. though The Netherlands the even then switched to right-side driving, Indonesians keep the left- side as their preference.“Indonesia flag icon” and “Thailand flag icon” are made by Nastiti Mayawulan
  • 15. Conclusion• Initially, the traffic was left-sided, but more and more countries slowly changed to the right.• Even though this change can be caused by the condition of the vehicle at the time, but it was clear that political situation gave strong influence of the changing.
  • 16. • Thank you!