How effective is the combination of your main product and ancillary texts?

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How effective is the combination of your main product and ancillary texts?

  1. 1. How effective is the combination of your main product and ancillary texts?<br />
  2. 2. Colour Scheme: Red, black, white<br />Font: Arial<br />Consistent Colour Scheme/Font<br />As you can see the colour scheme has been used quite consistently, this stemmed from the design of the listings magazine logo “TV Guru”. I think that the colours compliment each other really well and gives an overall professional and sleek look. The font style I have used is ‘Arial’ because of its plain, basic look, this allows me to used it with all my products as it is quite standard. <br />
  3. 3. Throughout all my products I have kept a sad and melancholic tone to gain audience sympathy. I have done this through language and music choices. <br />Music:<br />Adele – Someone Like You (Documentary)<br />Leonard Cohen – Hallelujah (Radio Trailer)<br />Consistent Tone<br />
  4. 4. Similar Style Pictures<br />Throughout my production and my ancillary tasks I have used similar styled pictures. The direction for these pictures were that my actor David Fieller would be very natural and incorporate a lot of his personality into the pictures, therefore he had a lot of freedom to express himself in whichever way he wanted.<br />
  5. 5. The radio and TV guides have grown to gain a lot of popularity, I think that that the combination of the two would work very well in the media market to promote my documentary.<br />Radio audiences increased by more than 400,000 in the last quarter of 2008, to 45.5 million listeners a week.<br />Almost one fifth of all radio listening is now via digital, up from 16.6 per cent a year ago, with almost one third of the population (32.2 per cent) tuning in to radio via a digitally-enabled set each week.<br />Popularity of Radio & Magazines<br />
  6. 6. In March 1991, the control on listings magazines ended and the market was opened up. Before this, there were two magazines in the market: Radio Times which was launched in 1923 and for BBC listings and TV Times which was launched in 1955, for ITV and Channel 4 listings in 1982. More magazines were appearing in the market at that time, TV Quick, What's on TV and TV Plus (which did not last). By the mid-1990s What's on TV was Britain's best-selling weekly magazine but in 2008, TV Choice which was launched in 1999 gained a higher distribution.<br />

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