Curating Content in Education

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This is a result of an investigation into the meaning of "content curation" as it applies to the field of education and offers a definition of the important elements and how it differs from "collection." It also explores curating as a way to meet some requirements of Common Core Standards as well as help students develop 21st century skills.

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  • Collecting is INCLUSIVE; Curating is EXCLUSIVE
  • Think about the process Museum Curators go through to create visual appealing, interesting displays…
  • They tell a story – activate our curiosity
  • The items they display and the way they organize it makes us want to know more
  • Cars, Motorcycles & Gadgets – 42 + pagesMy first curating experience with Scoop It: Waldo Canyon Fire – Started out as a personal scrapbook. Filter out social media hype. Try to get most valuable information to share.
  • Connect –point of entry. What you are interested in. At this point, you might just be collecting.Wonder –This is where a shift begins to go from collecting to curating. QUESTIONING is key. After collecting and reviewing many items – then Questioning begins to help you interpret, synthesize, and give the collection context around the questions you are trying to answer.Investigate: This is where you begin to search for items that specifically answer your questions – digging deeper and discarding far more than you keep.Construct: The pieces of the puzzle come together and you can see the big picture. You begin to think about your audience, and how to best share your newly gained understanding.Express: Organizing information, purposefully annotating, tagging – so it tells a story and will help others reach your level of understanding. Reflect: The learning never stops. As you continue to add to your curated resources, you are asking more questions, and adjusting what you include as those questions are answered.
  • eTextbooks: Obama in February, 2012 called for schools to get etextbooks into student hands within 5 years.In our district: we are moving in the direction of curated resources using course management systems, CK12 Flexbooks, wikis – Livebinders, Diigo, Learnist, Scoop It – and more. A blend of content through publishers, OER, and teacher-created materials.
  • institute for the futureThe Institute for the Future (IFTF) is an independent, nonprofit strategicresearch group with more than 40 years of forecasting experience. Thecore of our work is identifying emerging trends and discontinuities thatwill transform global society and the global marketplace. We provide ourmembers with insights into business strategy, design process, innovation,and social dilemmas. Our research spans a broad territory of deeplytransformative trends, from health and health care to technology, theworkplace, and human identity. The Institute for the Future is located inPalo Alto, California.The University of Phoenix Research Institute conducts scholarlyresearch on working learners, higher education, and industry to improveeducational outcomes and promote a more prepared workforce.The University of Phoenix Research Institute sponsored this piece ofresearch to increase understanding of the skills workers will need overthe next decade in a technologically advanced and changing world.
  • Curating Content in Education

    1. 1. Curating Content A Strategy for Common Core & 21st Century Skills Resources : http://curatingisthecure.wikispaces.com/ Nancy White 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist Academy District 20
    2. 2. Licensed Under Creative Commons. Available on Flickr from Spark CBC: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25031050@N06/3292307605/sizes/z/in/photostream /
    3. 3. Research in the Common Core “Research—both short, focused projects (such as those commonly required in the workplace) and longer term in depth research —is emphasized throughout the standards but most prominently in the writing strand.” From Key Points in the ELA Standards. Available http://www.corestandards.org/resources
    4. 4. Research in the Common Core “Students are to be given extensive practice with short, focused research projects. Writing Standard 7 emphasizes that students should conduct several short research projects in addition to more sustained research efforts. Materials should require several of these short research projects annually to enable students to repeat the research process many times and develop the expertise needed to conduct research independently. A progression of shorter research projects also encourages students to develop expertise in one area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of the same topic as well as other texts and source materials on that topic.” From Publisher’s Criteria for the Common Core Standards. Available http://www.corestandards.org/resources
    5. 5. Helping students master 21st century skills?
    6. 6. STRATEGY? Curating!
    7. 7. Collecting vs. Curating
    8. 8. Thinking Level  Collecting  Classifying  Lower Level of Blooms  Curating  Synthesis –Evaluation  Higher Level of Blooms
    9. 9. Process  Collecting  Not a lot of depth in collecting process  Examples: Pinterest, Facebook  Somewhat random process  Curating  “Cherry-Picked”  Synthesizing, Interpreting, Evaluating  Theme & Context  Disciplined, purposeful, continuous process of inquiry
    10. 10. Organization  Collecting  Thematic  Curating  Thematic AND Contextual  Includes real-world examples & uses
    11. 11. Value  Collecting  Meets a personal interest  Value to collector  Quantity matters  Curating  Meets a learning goal  Value to collector and other learners  QUALITY matters
    12. 12. Audience  Collecting  Not necessarily shared  Curating  Arranged, annotated and published somewhere  Available to the general public –beyond the life of a particular “course”  Shared
    13. 13. Collecting vs. Curating
    14. 14. Stripling Model of Inquiry http://tps.govst.edu/pdfs/StriplingModelInquiry.pdf
    15. 15. Stripling Model of Inquiry http://tps.govst.edu/pdfs/StriplingModelInquiry.pdf
    16. 16. Inquiry Based Learning Traditional Hands-on Structured Guided Student Directed Student Research Topic Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Question Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Materials Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Student Procedures/ Design Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Student Results/ Analysis Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Student Student Conclusions Teacher Student Student Student Student Focus on Teaching Focus on Learning Bonnsetter, Robert J. (2001). Inquiry: Learning from the past with an eye on the future. Retrieved 15 May, 2005 from the World Wide Web: http://unr.edu/homepage/jcannon/ejse/bonnstetter.html
    17. 17. Inquiry Based Learning Traditional Hands-on Structured Guided Student Directed Curating Topic Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Question Teacher Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Materials Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Student Procedures/ Design Teacher Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Student Results/ Analysis Teacher Teacher/ Student Student Student Student Conclusions Teacher Student Student Student Student Focus on Teaching Focus on Learning Bonnsetter, Robert J. (2001). Inquiry: Learning from the past with an eye on the future. Retrieved 15 May, 2005 from the World Wide Web: http://unr.edu/homepage/jcannon/ejse/bonnstetter.html
    18. 18. Self-Directed Learning “In its broadest meaning, ‘self-directed learning’ describes a process by which individuals take the initiative, with our without the assistance of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identify human and material resources for learning, choosing and implement appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes.” (M. Knowles, Principles of Androgogy, 1972)
    19. 19. • • • • • • Self-Directed Learningdescribes a Diagnosing Own Learning Needs Formulating Learning Goal Identify Resources Implement Learning Strategies Evaluating Learning Outcomesand)
    20. 20. Curating by Teachers  Aligned to content standards and curriculum  Deeper understanding of the “why” to pass on to students  Dialogue: Learning is social  Connect with community of learners Great place to start…but why not…
    21. 21. Let Students do the Curating!  Higher level thinking  Students in role of teacher  Constructing knowledge  Enduring understanding  Making connections  Content  Experts  Active, engaged learning!
    22. 22. Skills Identified in Workforce 2020 http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/front/docs/.../future_work_skills_2020.pdf
    23. 23. When you think of what might come after the textbook –what do you think it might be?
    24. 24. #beyond the textbook  “I imagine a techbook looking like a science notebook or journal. It would be a place where students can take notes, pin articles and videos, record experiments and discussions or lectures, organize data tied to these experiences sketch out ideas in words and pictures, and send and receive emails or other messages.” -Marybeth Hertz
    25. 25. #beyond the textbook  “For me, going beyond the textbook means giving students a toolbox rather than an instruction manual…So what would a student see when they first opened such a book? It’s blank.” -Frank Noschese
    26. 26. Tools
    27. 27. Questions? nancy.white@asd20.org Twitter: @NancyW Resources: https://curatingisthecure.wikispaces.com/

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