From social networking to professional networking: (Re)introducing your students to Twitter

  • 435 views
Uploaded on

Presentation by Olan Scott, Heather Muir and Naila Jinnah at the 2013 North American Society for Sport Management conference in Austin, TX, about integrating Twitter in the classroom and as a …

Presentation by Olan Scott, Heather Muir and Naila Jinnah at the 2013 North American Society for Sport Management conference in Austin, TX, about integrating Twitter in the classroom and as a professional networking tool for students.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
435
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Often student discussion dominated by one or two people. Putting lectures online may diminish this.Students can discuss relevant aspects of course materials while consuming lecture content.Knowledge of social media may be a leg-up for students in employment situations.
  • With the proliferation of social media usage, consumers are simultaneously producing and consuming media content (Mahan & McDaniel, 2006)Online gaming, Internet Mediated Communities (IMCs), and social networking websites (SNSs) have all contributed to Internet users being able to foster discussion and create meaning in ways which were not possible even five years ago
  • For example, we discussed product and brand positioning and linked this concept to NIKE’s sponsorship of a Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter. The discussions surrounded how this sponsorship helped to position NIKE in a new market and UFC into the mainstreamAlso, we discussed the athlete bonuses that governments give olympics winning athletes and we tweeted about various countries, then discussed the implications in class.Promotes social interaction between all students and allows them to learn from each other/complement their learning experience
  • after working with a group of esteemed educators and reviewing 50 years of educationalliterature, and they concluded that the first principle of best practices is encouraging contact between the studentsand facultySocial media allows the application of Chickering and Gamson’s (1978) seven principles of good practice for student engagementSome of these are salient when using social media in the classroom.
  • If objective is engaging with outside world, then others need to be able to read your topicsSelecting a hashtagOnline selection of news feeds and news services. Apps on smart phone also show which media is desired by this group.Many consumer products, especially online purchase, can be modified. For example NIKE ID where one can customise one’s shoes.
  • Class discussions are often dominated by a small section of individuals and people who are shy may not be confident to speak aloud in class. Thus, Twitter is a medium that can be used to give everyone an equal voice.Value for students
  • Netiquette, network etiquette, is the social code of the internet because internet is a network and etiquette is a social code. The internet is a network because it is a collection of computers that can communicate digitally. Etiquette is a social code because it uses contemporary standards as a guide.
  • - Selecting a hashtag
  • List them on your own sports industry pros Twitter list
  • Participating in industry tweet chats: students will already have the confidence, skills, and know-how. They will be comfortable with the environment and likely be more willing to participate than trying to join a professional tweet chat for the first time, especially with the big names that lead them.Networking opportunity for future career and to build the students’ personal brands, but it’s also a learning opportunity, both in terms of theory and in incorporating real world ideas and experiences in their understanding of class materials. Also useful information for when they do practicums – they will have more realistic expectations.Examples of popular sports industry tweet chats: #sbchat (#sportsbiz), etc. Give the examples to show how niche or broad the chats can be, and to reflect the variety of participants. Discuss how chats also have larger community hashtags (#sportsbiz) where students can interact with industry professionals and contribute to discussions with their own links/assessments/ideas at any time of day or night. It’s a way to assert their knowledge in their field of choice and to create their own niche – think of it as the modern elevator pitch, but to ALL the sports industry execs on Twitter.
  • Paired samples t-test analysis was conducted to evaluate changes across the semester. Statistically significant increase in means score for 11 of 13 itemsLargest increases:I felt more included in the unit content because it had Twitter (mean increase of 1.06)I was more engaged in this unit because it had Twitter (mean increase of 1.06) I believe Twitter was relatively easy to use (mean increase of 1.00)
  • Encourage active learningLearning as an active process, not memorise and disk dunkSocial media enables students to learn about new topics and apply real-world case studies to classroom concepts
  • 1. Encourage contact between students & facultyFrequent student-faculty contact IN and OUT of classes fosters student engagement and involvementSocial media enables instructors and students to be in contact and in discussion via a public online forum Third parties can also engage with course materials
  • Develop reciprocity and cooperation among studentsLearning should be collaborative and socialSocial media allows sharing of ideas & responding to othersSharpens thinking and deepens understanding
  • Also, use part of lecture time to teach netiquette and social media tips and tricks.

Transcript

  • 1. From Social Networking to Professional Networking: (Re)introducing your Students to Twitter Heather A. Muir, Bowling Green State University Olan K. M. Scott, Edith Cowan University Naila Jinnah, Queen’s University NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 2. Outline —  Aim of presentation —  Why use Twitter for education? —  Do students actually respond to Twitter use? —  Using Twitter in the classroom —  Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work —  Setting students up for professional success —  Tweet Chat Q&A —  Do Online lectures enhance student engagement? —  Formal (traditional) Q and A and discussion NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 3. Aim of Presentation This presentation will show how Twitter can be used to: —  Foster student engagement and inclusive class discussions —  Foster backchannel discussion of course content —  Foster professional networking opportunities for students NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 4. Twitter —  Since 2008, Twitter has become increasingly popular for many industries to use to communicate promotional offers, company news, and as a public relations tool (Hambrick, 2010; Lowe & Laffey, 2011). —  Twitter is a micro blogging service where users can send messages, known as tweets, of 140 characters or less. —  Twitter enables users to follow other users or companies, making public (and/or private) content more easily accessible to one’s followers, without assigning a “friendship” label. NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 5. Why use Twitter for education? —  Social media are a collection of Internet websites, services, and practices that support collaboration, community building, participation, and sharing (Junco, Heibergert, & Loken, 2010) —  Social network sites “provide an online medium for communication between users who have a public connection with one another” (Scott, Bradshaw, & Larkin, 2013, p. 5) —  Social media enable consumers to be both producers and consumers of media content – simultaneously! (Mahan & McDaniel, 2006) NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 6. Why use Twitter for education? —  The use of social media can enable the instructor to develop a community of co-creators of course content (Retelny, Birnholtz, & Hancock, 2012) —  Motivating students to be active in learning —  Can provide opportunities for new interactions such as enabling backchannel discussions during class, providing direction and cues for the instructor, delivering reminders to students and stimulating accessible discussions for all NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX BACKCHANNEL DISCUSSION: A secondary electronic conversation that takes place at the same time as a learning activity. (Source: EDUCAUSE)
  • 7. Why use Twitter for education? —  The use of social media enables instructors to bring real-world examples into the unit (Lowe & Laffey, 2011) —  Raise issues based on unit materials —  Foster enhanced engagement with a university unit materials (Junco et al., 2010) —  Twitter allows the instructor to develop a social presence among students and the faculty member. (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009a). —  Promotes social interaction between ALL students NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 8. Twitter and student engagement Social media allows for the application of Chickering & Gamson’s (1978) seven principles of good practice for student engagement NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 9. Twitter and student engagement 1. Encourage contact between students & faculty —  Frequent student-faculty contact IN and OUT of classes fosters student engagement and involvement —  Social media enables instructors and students to be in contact and in discussion via a public online forum —  Third parties can also engage with course materials NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 10. Twitter and student engagement 2. Develop reciprocity and cooperation among students —  Learning should be collaborative and social —  Social media allows sharing of ideas & responding to others —  Sharpens thinking and deepens understanding 3. Encourage active learning —  Learning as an active process, not memorise and disk dunk —  Social media enables students to learn about new topics and apply real-world case studies to classroom concepts NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 11. Twitter and student engagement 4. Give prompt feedback —  Quick feedback prevents students from disengaging —  Fosters sustained engagement (feedback loop) —  Social media enables BOTH instructors AND fellow students to give feedback & discuss the application of course materials to cases online NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 12. Twitter and student engagement 5. Emphasize time on “task” —  Faculty/universities should encourage students to be on task with their readings —  Timely social media workshops and Twitter chats encourage students to stay on top of course workloads NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 13. Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work —  Be an expert in your chosen social medium —  Set concrete goals for yourself and your students —  Remember that Millennials are motivated by customised learning experiences via media & consumer products NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 14. Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work —  Set up a standard, specific hashtag (e.g., #SPM2122) —  Set up an informational website outside of university portal for those who stumble on hashtag (Recommended) —  Rationale for Tweet chats as class work: —  To engage students in social media and teach them to engage the wider community —  To have inclusive discussion on contemporary issues relating to course materials NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 15. Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work —  Use the salami method so students have clear direction when answering questions —  I.e. Choose a very small section of a reading/lecture to discuss —  Give topic and possible answer suggestions in advance —  Aids in student preparation
  • 16. Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work —  Ensure syllabus contains information on Twitter and why it’s being used as a graded classroom activity —  Explain terminology, netiquette —  Explore various tweeting styles (convos vs. content) —  Offer “tech” support as users are signing up, tips & tricks NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 17. Best Practices: Twitter chats as class work Set a grading rubric and share it in advance: NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX Item % 1 2 3 4 5 Weekly Tweets Student actively uses Twitter S/U Student posts two unit relevant Tweets per week (minimum) 10 ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ Student replies to two tweets per week (minimum) 10 Live Tweet Lectures Answers each question S/U ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ Posts a reply to each question 10 ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ Shows understanding of unit materials 10 ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ Evidence of application of unit materials in answers 10 Demonstrates an ability to generate answers that engage others 10
  • 18. Example Topic —  Topic 3: —  Distinguished sport marketer Lawrence Wenner (1989) noted that “If the broadcasters [or sport marketers] have done their job well, the sports fan will be attentively viewing when a commercial message appears” (p. 15), which formed part of our discussion in week 7 on sport media and marketing. During our discussion on television, we discussed the ever-increasing avoidance of commercials (during ad breaks) through zapping, online streaming, and digital video recorders. —  In our online lecture, we will discuss how contemporary media embed marketing messages into the coverage of sporting events to ensure that a sport fan is “attentively viewing” the marketing message when it appears on screen. —  You may be asked to give examples about: —  New ways in which sports marketing message appear during game play of sporting events/matches —  Listing different ways in which you see marketing messages during sport events/games —  All information posted on olanscott.com rather than online portal NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 19. Example Questions —  In week 7, we discussed the myriad of ways that consumers can avoid watching ads during sporting telecasts #spm2122 —  These included: zapping, digital video recording or streaming and fast forwarding, and the old standby of channel surfing #spm2122 —  TV networks have been keen to capitalise on in-game promotions (see Channel 9 and Tom Waterhouse & many others) #spm2122 —  As @LawrenceWenner (1989) suggested, It is important that a sports fan attentively view a commercial message (p. 15). #spm2122 —  Q3a: As such, using examples, what other new and novel ways have you recently seen (sport) marketing during sport broadcasts? #spm2122 —  Q3b: List ways in which you see marketing messages during sporting telecasts (don’t include jersey sponsors or in-stadium ads) #spm2122 —  Q3c and Q3d will be an opinion question. —  Q3c: What do you think of all the advertising nowadays? Too much? Ok? Too little? #spm2122 —  Q3d: what do you think of all the alcohol and gambling advertising? #spm2122 NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 20. Tweet Chat Q & A —  Facilitated by Heather Muir, @wildestfan —  Use #NASSMchat hashtag (and #NASSM13) —  Tweet chat etiquette: 1.  Introduce yourselves when cued at beginning of chat 2.  Always use #NASSMchat when responding/commenting 3.  Respond to specific questions/comments: use A1 for Q1 4.  Look for cues from moderator (In this case, @wildestfan) NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 21. Tweet Chat Q & A —  Use web-based apps (TweetGrid, TweetChat) or standalone apps (Hootsuite, TweetDeck) —  Log in to your account and search or follow #NASSMchat —  All Tweets with #NASSMchat will load instantly —  Even those by users you don’t follow —  Note the difference between manual and Twitter RTs NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 22. Setting students up for professional success —  Decide on account focus BEFORE it becomes a problem: —  Balance between professional and personal —  Use your name if possible to help with brand association —  Potential employers can evaluate your worth —  Gives a better overview of who you are as a co-worker —  Follow industry professionals and mentors —  Learn from their Twitter usage —  Check their tweets for job search tips or links DON’T BE AFRAID TO INTERACT WITH THEM! NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 23. Setting students up for professional success —  Participate in industry tweet chats —  Students gain confidence, skills and know-how —  Networking opportunity for future career —  Helps students build their personal brand —  Helps students acquire real-world experience and contacts —  Networking doesn’t stop after the tweet chat is done! —  See next slide for popular sports business tweet chats NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 24. Setting students up for professional success — #sbchat – Sunday @ 9:30pm (general sport biz) —  #smsportschat – Thursday @ 9:00pm (sports & social media) —  #sportsPRchat – Tuesday @ 9:00pm (sports marketing) —  #SportJC – Every other Monday @ 8:00pm (sports job search) —  #SLChat – Every other Sunday @ 8:00pm (sports law) —  #SIDChat – Tuesday @ 2:00pm (sports information directors) —  #social4tixsales - Tuesday @ 8:00pm (ticket sales) —  #SABlog - Tuesday @ 8:00pm (sports analytics) * All times in ET NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 25. —  Scott and Stanway (2012) found that student engagement can be enhanced through the use of social media —  Paired sample t-tests were conducted —  Statistically significant increases in 11 of 13 items Do Online lectures enhance student engagement? NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 26. Do Online lectures enhance student engagement? NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX —  Social media enabled students to co create unit content and foster discussion in unit materials —  Social media supports collaborating on unit tasks (Junco et al., 2010)
  • 27. Do Online lectures enhance student engagement? NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX —  Social media enabled real world examples and organisations to be included in the discussion (Lowe & Laffey, 2011)
  • 28. Do Online lectures enhance student engagement? NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 29. Implications of using Tweet chats — Instructor: —  Must be an up-to-date, active social media user —  Must actively search for new resources —  Be a good editor to condense content as needed — Students: —  Must sign up to relevant network —  Must have basic technological access and knowledge —  Introduction to online networking (e.g., #FF) NOTE: Reduced physical classroom time NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX
  • 30. Questions? Olan Scott, PhD Edith Cowan University o.scott@ecu.edu.au @OlanScott Naila Jinnah Queen’s University njinnah@gmail.com @NailaJ Heather Muir, PhD Bowling Green State University hmuir@bgsu.edu @wildestfan NASSM 2013 – Austin, TX