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#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
#J412SSM Overview
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#J412SSM Overview

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Jan 7, 2012 Lecture

Jan 7, 2012 Lecture

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  • what do you know about social media? Examples, stories or news items?
  • Web 1.0 - connecting information Web 2.0 - social computing - putting the “I” in user interface, and the “we” into webs of social participation. Web 3.0 - the semantic web - representing meanings, connecting knowledge, and putting these to work in ways that make our experience of internet more relevant, useful, and enjoyable. And PORTABLE SYNTAX: The letters and symbols that make up communications. SEMANTICS: The meaning behind the symbols.
  • Cluetrain Manifesto was written 10 years ago. At the time, revolutionary... people could sign onto the manifesto and some were nervous about doing so. Nervous about saying these things...
  • The core of cluetrain is its 95 theses... a clear allusion to another set of 95 theses. I want to draw an obvious parallel.... Martin Luther’s 95 theses and the Cluetrain’s 95 theses were meant to change the power base. In the 15th century, the change was to take the power away from the church and put it in the hands of the people. In the 20th, the change was to take the power away from corporations and put them in the hands of the people. In the latter, the people (the markets) were already taking the power back. There are also parallels with the manifesto terminology, too, obviously. The idea of sharing the means of production (conversation, word of mouth)
  • Networked markets are beginning to self-organized ... around communities of interest... and this happening faster than companies that have traditionally served them. Thanks to the Web, markets are better informed, smarter and more demanding of qualities missing from most business organizations.
  • Listening to your customers! Listening to your markets!
  • What is a fan? How would you describe a fan? Fans are weird.
  • How lego’s community manager was influenced by the cluetrain. Adult fans of lego represent - 5% of market A relatively small number of LEGO fans (in every respect of that word), engage and energize the 95%. They build things like this! LEGO events occur all over the country and kids leave these event with their parents saying, “Let’s go to Toys R Us! I want to build that!” Fans are weird... but they are inspiring. There was an assumed 95/5 split. Most of the market was 7 - 12 year old boys. Really engaged kids spend $25/ year
  • LEGO: 6th largest toy manufacturer in the world Adult fans are 5 - 10% of annual business an enthusiastic, engaged kid will spend $50 a year No need to build a new community. community is about connecting, not about controlling. If the community you want to reach is already out there, respect that. If LEGO had tried to replicate LUGNET the international lego users group network, it wouldn’t been a recipe for failure
  • by listening to people and figuring out what the adult fans wanted... talking to the ambassadors. Decided to try something crazy. the short run of sets sold out in 3 months. You can buy this set today for about $800 on Amazon.
  • Blogs influence purchases: One half (50%) of blog readers say they find blogs useful for purchase information.Among respondents who say they have trusted blog content for purchase decisions in the past, over half (52%) say blogs played a role in the critical moment they decided to move forward with a purchase.For frequent readers, blog links appear to have a similar impact as a trusted recommendation from a person (a response from 39% of survey participants).
  • * with social media you can know what you’re customers are thinking... because you’re listening! And creating conversation (so they know that you are listening)
  • The conversation has multiplied over dozens, if not hundreds of different platforms. But people are using these tools in very different ways... NEXT
  • Explain each... what do you think the statistics are? SPECTATORS: consume social content including blogs, user-generated video, podcasts, forums or reviews CONVERSATIONALISTS: Put something in the “status” box. JOINERS: connect in social networks like MySpace & Facebook COLLECTORS: organize content for themselves or others using RSS feeds, tags and voting sites like Digg.com CRITICS: respond to content from others. They post reviews, comment on blogs, participate in forums and edit wiki articles CREATORS: Make social content go. They write blogs or upload video, music or text
  • 1. Where are your customers online? 2. What are your customers’ social behaviors online? 3. What social information or people do your customers rely on? 4. What is your customers’ social influence? Who trusts them? 5. How do your customers use social technologies in the context of your products? Curating – Heavily involved in online communities such as discussion boards, fan pages, and wikipedia through moderation, contribution, editing, etc. These curators contribute their time, energy, and perspective to improve the foundation for available information on a given subject. Producing - Creates and publishes original content and social objects as a way of expressing expertise, positions, as well as contributing to the ecosystem of information those in the other categories seek to share thoughts and also make decisions. Commenting - Responds to the content created by Producers. Even though they do not actively create and distribute original social objects, their activity is still influential to those around them. Sharing – Individuals who actively update their status on social sites and upload/forward photos, videos, articles, etc. This behavior earns relevance and also demonstrates knowledge and awareness. Watching - Content consumers who are seeking information in order to make decisions or learn from peers, or purely seeking entertainment.
  • Technographics & socialgraphics humanize our markets... allow us to better understand the activities and behaviors that help us make informed decisions about how and where we communicate & to what extent. GENUINE engagement is inspired by research and data -- that information requires that we tailor our stories and distribute them specifically in channels that cater to the technographics and demographics of our customers. But can we get even more personal, more “genuine” and more relevant? We need something to get to from the medium to the specific person we hope to reach. We need to find the “social beacons.” You can also call this group: trust agents, tastemakers, influencers, trendsetters and change agents. They are the voices within social networks who act at the information catalyst to those around them. With social media, we can pinpoint these individuals and learn in real time what they are seeking and to whom they are connected. But influence is not bestowed by networks in a universal way to any one type of person with one type of personality trait (unlike the real world in which influence tends to be more predictable). Behaviorgraphics looks at this issue.
  • At the center is Benevolence – The unselfish and kindhearted behavior that engenders and promotes recognition and reciprocity, and in doing so, earns the goodwill of those around them. This is the hub of social networking with a purpose, mission, and a genuine intent to grow communities based on trust, vision, and collaboration. Problem Solvers – One of the most common sources of conversations and updates in social media are questions…people seeking information in the hopes that commenters will respond with resolution or direction. Commenters – Providing thoughts, opinions, observations, experiences, and sometimes, unfiltered reactions to the information shared online. They are less likely to produce original content, but are compelled to share their views based on the introduction of content by others in and around their social graph. Researchers – Peer to peer influence is prominent in social networks and researchers rely on their social graphs for information and direction to make qualified decisions. They are also active in championing polls and surveys to truly learn about the thoughts and opinions of those connected to them. Conversationalists – Participation in conversations through proactive updates seeking responses or direct responses to other content, conversationalists fuel threads within and across networks. Curators – In the context of behaviorgraphics, curators carry a different role. This group works diligently to find and only share what captivates them as filtered by what they believe will interest their followers. Producers – Among the more elite group of online participants, their stature is earned by the amount of content they generate within multiple networks. Broadcasters – Social media is proving to be both an effective broadcast and conversational platform. Broadcasters are mostly one-way communicators who either intentionally or unintentionally push information to followers without injecting conversational aspects into the mix. Marketers – Profiles dedicated to marketing ideas, products, or services and may or may not include content outside of their portfolio, unless the account is focused on funneling beneficial and value-added solutions to specific audiences regardless of origin. Socialites – Individuals who have earned varying levels of weblebrity, these new internet famous personae earn recognition and attention in online networks which is increasingly spilling over in real world fame. Self-promoters – Unlike broadcasters and marketers, self-promoters are unconcealed in their intentions through constant updating of activities, events, and accomplishments. Egocasters – Contribute to the “ego” in the egosystem and represent the evolution of self-promoters. Through constant promotion and the activities and responses that ensue, promoters graduate to a position of perceived prominence and collective unawareness.  What they think and say is what they believe to be the reality for one and for all. They lose touch with perspective as listening gives way to telling… Observers – Often referred to as inactives, lurkers, or simply consumers, Observers represent the majority of the social Web today, defined by those who read and also share information in the backchannel, including email, and also in the real world. Social Climbers – Social capital is not only something that is earned in social networking, it is something that is proactively pursued by those whose sole mission is to rise to the top. These individuals intentionally climb ladders on the avatars, profiles, and social capital of others most often misrepresenting their purpose and stature to earn an audience based on disingenuous intentions. TMI – The things some share in social media continue to blur the line between what’s relegated to inner monologue versus that for sharing with others in public. The state of sharing “Too much information” is dictated by those on the receiving end of the update, not those who publish it. Spammers – Those accounts and profiles that are created to push messages blindly and without regard for those with whom they come into contact. Often times they’re tied to current events (using trending keywords or hashtags) or targeting influential voices to lure them into clicking through to their desired goal. Leachers -Not included in the graph, but an important category to recognize as leachers take the good work of others and channel it into their own accounts almost exclusively for the sake of promoting their cause. Complainers – When we love something, we tell a few people; when something bothers us, we tell everyone.  Complainers are often sharing their discontent as a primary ingredient in their social stream. And, as customer service takes to the social web, these complainers are only encouraged to share their experiences to achieve satisfaction and earn recognition for their role as the new social customer.
  • Discuss... talk about where you fit in terms of the technographics, socialgraphics and behaviorgraphics.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Interactive Internet Social Media The Social WebThe Groundswell
    • 2. social media in the news...
    • 3. The Evolution of the Web… Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Web 3.0 get noise make noise filter noise• read content • user generated • real-time• paid content • interactivity/sharing • ubiquitous (always• move to digital • connectivity connected)• static sites • pull content/free • location aware• push content • social networking • sensors• eCommerce • tailored (smaller • streaming audio screen) • streaming video • high-quality camera & audio 3
    • 4. The End of Business as Usual. We are not seats or eyeballs or end users or consumers. We are human beings - and ourreach exceeds your grasp. Deal with it.
    • 5. 95 Theses
    • 6. Discovering, inventing and sharing withblinding speed all over the globe. Markets are conversations. Conversations arenatural, open, honest, direct, funny, shocking... and human.
    • 7. 95 Theses
    • 8. What’s a fan?
    • 9. Jake McKee & AFOLs LEGOs as a creative mediumAdult Fans - $2,000/year in LEGOsCurrent fan base, active community LEGO Ambassadors Ambassadors: - Builds relationships & 2-way communications - Help spread info about new products to their networks
    • 10. 3000 pieces $300“You’re Insane!”
    • 11. Building on CluetrainHow are Conversations Growing?
    • 12. People Creating: blogsPeople Connecting: social networksPeople Collaborating: wikisPeople Reacting: forums, ratings and reviewsPeople Organizing Content: tags
    • 13. I trust people like me • Blogs influence purchases • Blogs play a critical role in decision making • Blogs have similar impact to a personal recommendation from a friendhttp://www.marketingcharts.com/online/blogs-influence-consumer-purchases- more-than-social-networks-6616/
    • 14. I want to engagewith brands• 36% of online customers think more positively about a company that has a blog• Marketing, public relations and customer service are converging. Customers expect to be heard.• 56% of customers feel better about companies and their brands when they can interact with them through social media.• 57% feel better served
    • 15. socialgraphics
    • 16. Curating ProducingSharing Commenting Watching
    • 17. Who are the social beacons?
    • 18. behaviorgraphics
    • 19. Where do you fit?

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