Ha002 hazmat identification

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  • Learning Objectives: Identify the nine hazard classes defined by the U.S. Department of Transportation or “DOT.” Recognize the DOT marking signs used in transporting hazardous materials. Know how to use the Emergency Response Guidebook to determine the identity and potential hazard of a placarded hazardous material. Understand the NFPA 704 Marking System.
  • The wording on each tells the specific hazard.
  • A copy of this book is available for every emergency response apparatus in the United States.
  • You may get the name from bills of lading or an on-site supervisor.
  • The orange-bordered pages of the ERG tells you what to do once you have identified the type of chemical involved.
  • The highlighted chemicals in the yellow- and blue-bordered pages have the ability to become airborne, making them much more potentially dangerous to people and the environment. The chemicals that are not highlighted will not appear in the green section.
  • Ha002 hazmat identification

    1. 1. HAZMAT AWARENESS HAZMAT Identification
    2. 2. Section 1 IntroductionHAZMAT Awareness Slide 22- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    3. 3. Each day, thousands of shipments ofchemicals and other hazardous substances aretransported by ship, rail and truck frommanufacturers to the point of use.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 32- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    4. 4. When fully contained,these products present nodanger to people, animalsor the environment.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 42- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    5. 5. If a hazardous material isreleased, emergencyresponders are often thefirst people called toidentify the material.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 52- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    6. 6. Using a generic response to an unidentifiedsubstance is dangerous and could causefurther harm.Always take the time to “know before you go”whenever you suspect the presence ofhazardous materials at a scene.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 62- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    7. 7. Learning Objectives: 1. Nine Hazard Classes Defined by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 2. DOT Marking Signs Used in Transporting HAZMATS 3. How to Use the Emergency Response Guidebook 4. The NFPA 704 Marking System HAZMAT Awareness Slide 7 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    8. 8. Section 2DOT Hazard Classes: Part 1HAZMAT Awareness Slide 82- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    9. 9. To make the transport of hazardous materialssafer, the U.S. Department of Transportation(DOT) created a system of identifyinghazardous materials during their movementby air, rail, water, on roadways or throughpipelines.The DOT system established nine hazardclasses, which identify what type of potentialhazard the product presents in the event of aspill or release.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 92- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    10. 10. DOT Class 1: Class 1 Explosives: – Mass explosion hazards (dynamite) – Minor explosion hazards (detonation cord) HAZMAT Awareness Slide 10 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    11. 11. DOT Class 2: Class 2 Gases: –Flammable –Non-flammable –Poison –Oxidizer HAZMAT Awareness Slide 11 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    12. 12. DOT Class 3: Class 3 Flammable Liquids: – Gasoline – Fuel oils HAZMAT Awareness Slide 12 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    13. 13. DOT Class 4: Class 4 Flammable Solids, Spontaneously Combustible and Dangerous When Wet: – Magnesium ribbons – Explosives that are wetted with water or alcohol HAZMAT Awareness Slide 13 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    14. 14. Section 3DOT Hazard Classes: Part 2HAZMAT Awareness Slide 142- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    15. 15. DOT Class 5: Class 5 Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides: – Produce oxygen – Dangerous in a fire HAZMAT Awareness Slide 15 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    16. 16. DOT Class 6: Class 6 Poisonous Materials: –Arsenic –Biological toxins •Anthrax •Botulism HAZMAT Awareness Slide 16 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    17. 17. DOT Class 7: Class 7 Radioactive Materials: – Divided into 3 levels • I • II • III (the most hazardous) HAZMAT Awareness Slide 17 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    18. 18. DOT Class 8: Class 8 Corrosives (acids and bases): – Destroy skin – Corrode steel – Corrode aluminum HAZMAT Awareness Slide 18 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    19. 19. DOT Class 9: Class 9 Miscellaneous Hazardous Materials: – Hazardous waste – Catch-all category for things that don’t fit into the other eight classes HAZMAT Awareness Slide 19 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    20. 20. Section 4 DOT Placards: Part 1HAZMAT Awareness Slide 202- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    21. 21. “Extremely dangerous” materials, such ashighly sensitive explosives or poisonousgases, require placarding to transport ANYamount.Many “less hazardous classes” do not requirea placard if the shipment contains LESS than1,001 pounds (454 kilograms).HAZMAT Awareness Slide 212- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    22. 22. DOT placards are helpful because there areclues on each placard that you can use torecognize and identify the hazardous material.You need to know the color and symbol cluesfor each class because you will probably beidentifying placards from a distance and thewording and numbers may be difficult to see.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 222- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    23. 23. DOT Class 1 placards: Class 1 Explosives: – Placards are orange with an explosion symbol at the top – Some will not show the symbol but will have the hazard class, division and descriptive words HAZMAT Awareness Slide 23 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    24. 24. DOT Class 2 placards: Class 2 Gases: – Non-flammable gases are green with the cylinder symbol in the upper part of the placard – Flammable gases are red with a flame symbol – Toxic or poison gases are white with a skull and crossbones symbol – Oxidizer gases are yellow with a flaming circle symbol HAZMAT Awareness Slide 24 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    25. 25. DOT Class 3 placards: Class 3 Flammable Liquids: – Red placard with a flame symbol and the words: • Flammable • Combustible • Flammable liquid or • Type of material HAZMAT Awareness Slide 25 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    26. 26. DOT Class 4 placards: Class 4 Flammable Solids, Spontaneously Combustible and Dangerous When Wet: – Red – Red and white striped – Half-red, half-white – Blue HAZMAT Awareness Slide 26 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    27. 27. DOT Class 5 placards: Class 5 Oxidizers: – Yellow placards with the burning circle symbol – Organic peroxides have a half-red, half-yellow placard HAZMAT Awareness Slide 27 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    28. 28. Section 5 DOT Placards: Part 2HAZMAT Awareness Slide 282- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    29. 29. DOT Class 6 placards: Class 6 Poisonous Materials: – White placards – Skull and crossbones for the most toxic or poisonous materials HAZMAT Awareness Slide 29 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    30. 30. DOT Class 7 placards: Class 7 Radioactive Materials: – “Tri-foil” symbol, small circle with three fan blades around it • White • Half-yellow, half-white HAZMAT Awareness Slide 30 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    31. 31. DOT Class 8 placards: Class 8 Corrosives: – Half-black, half-white – Symbol of test tubes dripping on a bar and a hand HAZMAT Awareness Slide 31 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    32. 32. DOT Class 9 placards: Class 9 Miscellaneous Hazardous Materials: – White placard with the upper half showing a series of black vertical bars HAZMAT Awareness Slide 32 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    33. 33. Dangerous placard: Dangerous: – Transporting a MIXED load of hazardous materials of LESS than 5,000 pounds (2,270 kilograms) of any ONE type – Primarily red, with a white stripe containing the word “Dangerous” in large letters across the middle HAZMAT Awareness Slide 33 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    34. 34. Placards are used to give you a clue thathazardous materials are present.Be aware that an estimated 20% of truckscarrying hazardous materials do not haveplacards or are placarded incorrectly.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 342- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    35. 35. Section 6Emergency Response GuidebookHAZMAT Awareness Slide 352- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    36. 36. The Emergency ResponseGuidebook is a valuabletool for identifying thespecific product involved.Also referred to as theDOT book, the orangebook, or the ERG.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 362- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    37. 37. The guidebook ispublished by the U.S.Department ofTransportation,Transportation Canada,and the Secretariat ofCommunications andTransportation of Mexico.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 372- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    38. 38. This book lists most of thecommonly transportedchemicals that areregulated by the DOT.It is divided into sectionsto help you locateinformation quickly.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 382- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    39. 39. First section: Yellow-bordered pages: – Chemicals by UN number, in numerical order – Use if you have a placard or other identifying number – Highlighted chemicals can become airborne and can be found in the green-bordered section – All chemicals will be in the orange-bordered (guide) section HAZMAT Awareness Slide 39 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    40. 40. Second section: Blue-bordered pages: – Chemicals by name in alphabetical order – Use if you know the name of the chemical – Highlighted chemicals can become airborne and can be found in the green-bordered section – All chemicals will be in the orange-bordered (guide) section HAZMAT Awareness Slide 40 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    41. 41. Third (Guide) section: Orange-bordered pages: – Initial response activities are outlined – All of the chemicals in the yellow- and blue- bordered sections will be listed here HAZMAT Awareness Slide 41 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    42. 42. Third (Guide) section (cont.): The “Public Safety” section of the orange- bordered section: – What level of protective clothing is needed – If evacuation may be necessary HAZMAT Awareness Slide 42 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    43. 43. Last section: Green-bordered pages: – Specific evacuation, isolation and protective actions for the highlighted chemicals in the yellow- and blue- bordered sections – Distances for materials that require isolation and evacuation HAZMAT Awareness Slide 43 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    44. 44. Using the ERG: Let’s look at how you use the ERG at an emergency scene. HAZMAT Awareness Slide 44 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    45. 45. Using the ERG (cont.): From a safe distance, the responders can see the placard and the number on the placard to begin identifying the material. HAZMAT Awareness Slide 45 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    46. 46. Using the ERG (cont.): What information do they use from the placards? Where will they look in the ERG? HAZMAT Awareness Slide 46 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    47. 47. Using the ERG (cont.): In this case the “Corrosive” placard and the number “1830” give them the information they need to use the ERG. They use the yellow- bordered pages of the ERG to look up the chemical number, 1830. HAZMAT Awareness Slide 47 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    48. 48. Using the ERG (cont.): The number 1830 is “sulfuric acid.” Next to the chemical number, 1830, is guide number 137. The guide number, 137, refers to the orange- bordered pages. HAZMAT Awareness Slide 48 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    49. 49. Using the ERG (cont.): At guide 137, in the orange-bordered section, the responders find the potential hazards and the correct emergency response procedures to take for this chemical. HAZMAT Awareness Slide 49 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    50. 50. Section 7 NFPA 704 Marking SystemHAZMAT Awareness Slide 502- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    51. 51. When hazardous materials are stored or usedat an occupancy, one of the most commonidentification systems is the NFPA 704Marking System.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 512- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    52. 52. The NFPA 704 placardsare diamond shapedsquares, similar to theDOT placard system, butwithin the square thereare four smaller squaresthat indicate the level offour different types ofhazards.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 522- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    53. 53. A level of hazard isindicated by the numbers“0 to 4,” with “4” beingthe most hazardous.The top square is red, andindicates the degree offire hazard.A “0” means the materialwill not burn; a “4” meansan extremely flammableproduct.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 532- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    54. 54. The right-hand square isyellow and indicates thereactivity hazard.Reactivity is whethermaterial is unstable whenshocked or placed underpressure.A “4” means the productcan detonate easily; a “0”means it’s normallystable.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 542- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    55. 55. The left-hand square isblue and indicates thehealth hazard to people.A “4” means if you are instandard firefighting PPE,it presents severe risk tohealth; a “0” means thereis no known healthhazard.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 552- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    56. 56. The bottom square iswhite and indicates anyspecial hazard that thematerial may present,such as whether or not thematerial is explosive orreactive with water.Sometimes a number isused and sometimes ashort abbreviation is used,such as ”OX” for anoxidizing agent.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 562- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    57. 57. A slashed W indicateswater reactivity and isespecially important forfirefighters because itindicates that the materialis water reactive.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 572- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    58. 58. Because facilities often contain dozens, if nothundreds of hazardous materials, the NFPA704 system is usually used to warn of thehighest level of concern.Always check with the occupant to determineexactly what is in the building—the systemonly gives you a first warning of the potentialdanger.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 582- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    59. 59. Section 8 Session SummaryHAZMAT Awareness Slide 592- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    60. 60. Session Summary: 1. Nine Hazard Classes Defined by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 2. DOT Marking Signs Used in Transporting HAZMATS 3. How to Use the Emergency Response Guidebook 4. The NFPA 704 Marking System HAZMAT Awareness Slide 60 2- HAZMAT Identification © 2007 - 2008
    61. 61. Remember that hazardous materials canexplode, poison, corrode, ignite at roomtemperature or cause radiation exposure…to name just a few of the potential hazards.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 612- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    62. 62. The ability of the firstresponse team to identifyexactly what is involved inan incident is essential toprotecting both the publicand the environment in ahazardous materialsemergency.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 622- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    63. 63. Use the resources at yourdisposal to “know beforeyou go” and make everyresponse a safe response.HAZMAT Awareness Slide 632- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008
    64. 64. The EndHAZMAT Awareness Slide 642- HAZMAT Identification© 2007 - 2008

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