What's New at NWEA: Children’s Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA)
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What's New at NWEA: Children’s Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA)

What's New at NWEA: Children’s Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA)
Fusion 2012, the NWEA summer conference in Portland, Oregon

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  • Developed at Columbia UniversityUsed by schools, districts and early learning centers nationwide Instructional recommendationsEfficient
  • To illustrate how the CPAA’s scaffolded approach works, we’ve assembled anecdotal data from a class of Kindergarteners. This item (4 minus 3) is one example. With the initial presentation (as shown), only 31% could answer the question. 69% could not. This represents two segments for only two outcomes- either correct or incorrect- like a traditional assessment. Whereas a traditional assessment lumps all students in the red segment together, there is certainly a wide range of students within the red group. Whereas some students might have been completely confused by the item, some childrenmay have just been “slightly off” or almost able to answer the question. In order to more accurately diagnose student performance, the teacher needs to be able to flesh out these student who are on ‘on the bubble’. This requires one additional step- the 69% segment was then presented with a hint…As shown in the upper right hand corner, the hint presents the item differently, with a concrete representation of the item 4 – 3 (four balls appear, and three disappear in an animation).After the hint was provided to the 69% group, an additional 52% of the students WERE able to answer the question- a very large group of children.
  • Similar to 3 cups or stoplight motifThe assessment has successfully separated the students who were on the cusp (yellow) from the student who were completely off (red). The teacher’s approach to teaching students in these two groups will be very different. Whereas the students in the yellow group are very close to being able to answer 4 – 3 independently (it’s in their ZPD), the students in the red group need more intensive intervention, and at the level of basic skills. Unlike a traditional assessment, the CPAA offers a third possible outcome- correct with a hint. The teacher is now able to meet student needs more effectively.
  • First, the individual student layer…
  • Samantha’s individual report- The Report Card tab shows an overview of her performance scores- colored bars again, as well as Samantha’s (whole number) score for each concept compared with the class averages (broken down into tenths of a point). What we see immediately is that Samantha is all over the place…very strong in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics/Writing, and Numeracy, while really struggling in Patterns and Functions.Clicking on the Full Report tab brings us into the most detailed and telling portion of Samantha’s report…
  • The Full Report displays the student’s performance level, narratives, and item analysis for each concept area.For example, the Reading button displays Samantha’s performance level on that section of the assessment (Approaching Expectation). Below that, a narrative paragraph explains how she reached that performance level and describes her experience exactly.The teacher can click on the expandable tabs below to view the item analysis-- an item-by-item breakdown of the questions that were presented to Samantha, and her response (once again- three possible outcomes: correct answer, correct with a hint, or incorrect with a hint). Note that the standards alignment is also indicated here.
  • The Full Report displays the student’s performance level, narratives, and item analysis for each concept area.For example, the Reading button displays Samantha’s performance level on that section of the assessment (Approaching Expectation). Below that, a narrative paragraph explains how she reached that performance level and describes her experience exactly.The teacher can click on the expandable tabs below to view the item analysis-- an item-by-item breakdown of the questions that were presented to Samantha, and her response (once again- three possible outcomes: correct answer, correct with a hint, or incorrect with a hint). Note that the standards alignment is also indicated here.
  • Within Samantha’s report, we can click on the Activities tab to find out what types of activities will be recommended for her based on her performance…
  • …to view an Individualized Intervention Plan for Samantha.Ideally, every teacher would have an individualized intervention plan for every student they serve. However, without objective, empirical data, matching a student to activities involves a certain amount of guess work. This process is greatly improved by the CPAA, with its scientific approach, and the use of computerized algorithms to match students to activities based on performance. Based on Samantha’s performance from one sub-concept to another, she will be matched with Challenging (enrichment), Instructional (mainstream), or Supportive (remedial) activities. The level is indicated in the first line of the activity description.
  • By clicking on”Parent Report” the teacher can access a customized report for the student’s family to take home. The parent report includes:An explanation of the CPAA’s format, purpose, and benefitsA performance summary- narratives for parentsA list of activities for parents to use in the home setting, allowing them to collaborate with teachers and reinforce learning at home
  • The second tab- Class Roll- shows the class’ scores broken down student by student, in columns according to the 7 concept areas for 2nd grade.
  • By clicking on a column header- Patterns and Functions, for example- the teacher can group the students according to performance in that particular category, with color coding. For teachers, this facilitates grouping decisions of all sorts- seating arrangements, reading groups, groups for centers/stations, etc.
  • Clicking on the third tab, Activities, will take us to the master list of Recommended Activities for use with various groups of students, according to ability level…
  • Providing access to various research-based lesson plan concepts laid out in paragraph form. The first sentence of each activity indicates the relevant sub-concept of the activity ( for example- Fraction Comparison) and level of difficulty of the activity (Instructional):3 levels:‘Challenging’ = enrichment, for strong students‘Instructional’ = on grade level, for mid-level performers‘Supportive’ = remedial, for struggling studentsMost importantly, we find the fivestudents (listed below) that have been assigned to this activity, based on their performance. Each activity has a unique audience, which provides the teacher with a comprehensive plan for differentiating instruction. To view all of the activities (and the recommended participants) in one screen, the teacher can click on Print Version in the upper right hand corner…
  • Administrator layer…
  • Reports- Principal’s viewThe Report Card tab displays school averages for a given grade level for either Language Arts or Mathematics concepts. Color-coded bars are according to the CPAA’s 4-point rubric, explained in the legend (upper right). On the left hand side of the screen, the Principal can click on a teacher’s name to view a class report.By clicking on Assessment Completion…
  • Administrators can also access school or district-wide demographic data- info related to the ethnicity, gender, IEP status, LEP states, income levels, and migrant status of the students as a whole in the CPAA system. Pie charts show participation by group, but are also interactive. By clicking on ‘Ethnicity’…
  • …the user is taken into a new page that allows the user to track correlations between demographic categories (gender, Title I, ELL, etc) and academic performance.In this case, we can compare language arts and math performance according to ethnicity.

What's New at NWEA: Children’s Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What’s Newat NWEA? FUSION June 2012
  • 2. Our Partners Need More Evidence of Student LearningOur partners use MAP to answer important questions about their students’ learning: Is every child growing? Where will they be at the end of the school year?Many partners have expressed a need for more student data between MAP assessments. They want to know: Where are my students now? What progress are we making? What skills are they missing?
  • 3. Formative Long-cycle Medium-cycle Short-cycle Assessment Formative Formative Formative Cycles Assessments Assessments Assessments Are my kids growing What do Where is each as planned? Where How much progress student in their you learn? will they be at the end are they making? learning right now? of the school year?Where are you in Across units, Within & between Daily lessonthe curriculum? terms teaching units When in the 9 weeks, Multiple times Daily, hourly, teaching end of semester within terms minute-to-minute process? Children’s Progress NWEA MPG (K – 2) Keeping Learning (PK – 3) Solutions MAP (3 – 12) on Track ® (K – 12) Skills Pointer (3 – 9)
  • 4. Children’s Progress
  • 5. For Early LearnersGrowth MPG Data Skills Children’s Data Progress
  • 6. Children’s Progress Highlights• Skill data to drive instruction• PK-3, Early Literacy & Math• Adaptive, scaffolded• Child-friendly & FUN• Available in English & Spanish• Efficient• Instant reports• Parent communication
  • 7. The Benefit of Scaffolded AssessmentInitial Question With Scaffolding Correct 31% 69% Incorrect
  • 8. The Benefit of Scaffolded AssessmentInitial Question With Scaffolding Different instructional needs Correct on first try 31% 52% 17% Correct with a hint Incorrect, even with hint
  • 9. Sneak Peek: Assessment
  • 10. Sneak Peek: Reports• Instant DISTRICT• Web-based• Standards-aligned SCHOOL• Narratives & Rubric scoring• Instructional CLASS recommendations STUDENT
  • 11. Student Level DISTRICT SCHOOL CLASS STUDENT
  • 12. Class Level DISTRICT SCHOOL CLASS STUDENT
  • 13. Reports: School & District Level DISTRICT SCHOOL CLASS STUDENT
  • 14. Thank You!