Designing Instruction for
Deep Learning and Diversity
         Session Two
       January 26, 2010
      Capilano Elementa...
Designs 2010 Series
•   January 12   Setting the Stage for Instructional Design that
                          fosters Dee...
Post-its:
 Please post
 any of your
 wonderings     Parkin g Lot
to one of the
   “Wonder
    Walls”
 throughout
 the sess...
“To begin with the end in mind
    means to start with a clear
understanding of your destination.”




                   ...
“Backward Design”
“Deliberate and focused instructional
design requires us to make an important
shift… The shift involves ...
UBD End Results

• Effective units
  with deeper
  understandings
• Curriculum design
  that meets the needs
  of all learn...
Backward Design Model – 3 Stages
1. Identify desired results
2. Determine acceptable
   evidence (Feb 9th)
3. Plan learnin...
Learning For Understanding
Three different but interrelated goals:
• For students to acquire important
  information and sk...
“Twin Sins” of Curriculum Design

1. Activity-Oriented Design
“Hands-on without “Minds On”

2. Curriculum Coverage
“Marchi...
Concept Based vs. Topic Based
            Instruction
Concept-Based Instruction:      Topic-Based Instruction:
• Results i...
Concept-Based Instruction
  Allows instruction to be more effective
  by providing the opportunity for teachers
  (K-12 and...
Pioneer Life: Lesson Make-Over
BEFORE UbD              AFTER UbD
• Look at the Grade     • Discuss the
  3 Social Studies ...
Backward Design Unit Template
Unit Topic:


BIG IDEA(S):


STAGE 1: Desired Results
Prescribed Learning Outcomes:




Endu...
Stage 1: Desired Results
  Using the Planning Template
• Unit Topic
• Prescribed Learning Outcomes (Goals)
• Big Ideas (Co...
Meaningful Use of PLOs
•   Danger of coverage mentality
•   Need to prioritize & identify BIG IDEAS
•   Clarity of goal es...
BIG IDEAS
• Provide a conceptual lens
• Are universal and timeless – carry through the ages
  and across cultures
• Are br...
Finding the Big Ideas:
Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs)
1. Select 2-3 related PLOs
  – Look for a natural link or conne...
Finding the Big Ideas:
Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs)
2. Highlight the key (recurring) nouns and
   adjectives in the...
Finding the Big Ideas:
Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs)
4. Identify a pair (two) concepts that:
  – Indicate the kind o...
Unpacking PLOs: Grade 3 Example
PLOs for Grade 3 Social Studies
• B1: Identify changes that can occur in
     communities ...
School Teams: Your Task
• Work through the steps of unpacking the
  PLOs to find the Big Ideas (key concepts).
Finding the Big Ideas:
Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs)
1. Select 2-3 related PLOs
2. Highlight the key (recurring) nou...
Enduring Understandings



What will the
  students
remember for:

40 seconds?
40 minutes?
 40 years?
Establishing Curricular Priorities
             Worth being
             familiar with


             Important to
       ...
Enduring Understandings Are:
• Statements of conceptual relationships –
  includes two (or more) concepts (Big Ideas)
  de...
Grade 3 Example:
PLOs for Grade 3 Social Studies
• B1: Identify changes that can occur in communities over
  time
• B2: De...
Enduring Understandings
      Table Work: Sorting Activity
• Sort the statements in the envelope on
  your table into yes ...
Yes Examples
• What we believe is part of who we are.
• Homes reflect personal identity and local culture.
• Past civilizat...
No Examples
• Ancient Egyptians had a sophisticated irrigation system.
• Explore what an integer is.
• My family is specia...
Handout
• Compare the attributes listed on the
  handout to those listed on your chart
  paper
• Enter into a brief dialog...
Enduring Understandings
• Based on the Big Ideas (concepts) at the
  heart of the discipline - has enduring value
  beyond...
You’ve got to go
below the surface…
Your Task

• Using the identified Big Ideas (concepts)
  write an Enduring Understanding.
Essential Questions
• Help us stay focused on the
  Enduring Understanding
• Broad and open-ended
• Are arguable and impor...
Examples of Essential Questions
Big Ideas: change, similarities and differences, culture.
Enduring Understanding:
  Communi...
Essential vs. Leading Questions
• Essential Questions
  – Asked to be argued
  – Designed to “uncover” new ideas, views, l...
Essential Questions –
           Concept Attainment
No Examples:                   Yes Examples:
• What is foreshadowing? ...
Essential Questions –
               Yes or No?
• When was the Canadian Constitution signed?
• What are the relationships ...
Your Task
• Design Essential Questions that will help
  students to understand the Enduring
  Understanding
Where to Differentiate?
Tomlinson & McTighe (2006) Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. p. 36...
Reflections and Feedback
Questions?
 Remember to put any “Post-It” questions on
 one of the “Wonder Walls” before you leave...
Designs 2010 Session 2 Elementary
Designs 2010 Session 2 Elementary
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Designs 2010 Session 2 Elementary

  1. 1. Designing Instruction for Deep Learning and Diversity Session Two January 26, 2010 Capilano Elementary
  2. 2. Designs 2010 Series • January 12 Setting the Stage for Instructional Design that fosters Deep Learning and Embraces Diversity • January 26 Backward Design: Goal Setting, Enduring Understandings, Essential Questions • February 9 Backward Design Stage Two: Assessment For, As, Of Learning • March 29 Backward Design Stage Three: Teaching for Deep Understanding and Diversity • April 12 Differentiated Assessment and Instruction Practices
  3. 3. Post-its: Please post any of your wonderings Parkin g Lot to one of the “Wonder Walls” throughout the session. Please use a “scrap strip” on your table for any questions, thoughts, or comments.
  4. 4. “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination.” S. Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
  5. 5. “Backward Design” “Deliberate and focused instructional design requires us to make an important shift… The shift involves thinking a great deal, first, about the specific learnings sought, and the evidence of such learnings, before thinking about what we, as the teacher, will do or provide in teaching and learning activities.”
  6. 6. UBD End Results • Effective units with deeper understandings • Curriculum design that meets the needs of all learners in the class
  7. 7. Backward Design Model – 3 Stages 1. Identify desired results 2. Determine acceptable evidence (Feb 9th) 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction (March 29th)
  8. 8. Learning For Understanding Three different but interrelated goals: • For students to acquire important information and skills • For students to make meaning of that content • For students to effectively transfer their learning to new situations both within school and beyond it Wiggins & McTighe (2008). Putting Understanding First. ASCD.
  9. 9. “Twin Sins” of Curriculum Design 1. Activity-Oriented Design “Hands-on without “Minds On” 2. Curriculum Coverage “Marching through the textbook”
  10. 10. Concept Based vs. Topic Based Instruction Concept-Based Instruction: Topic-Based Instruction: • Results in higher-level, • Holds learning to a fact or integrated thinking activity level • Timeless, universal, and • Topical Theme Instruction abstract (e.g., Plants, Dinosaurs, • Forces students to think Japan, Penguins) about topics and facts in • Has short term use – to terms of their transferable cover an event, issue , or significance (cross- set of facts curricular) • Increases the overloaded • Allows flexibility to allow curriculum students to search for and construct knowledge Erickson, L. (2008). Stirring the head, heart and soul: redefining curriculum, instruction, and concept- based learning. p 30 - 41
  11. 11. Concept-Based Instruction Allows instruction to be more effective by providing the opportunity for teachers (K-12 and beyond) to work as a team to systematically build conceptual understandings throughout the student’s years of education. Erickson, L. (2008). Stirring the head, heart and soul: redefining curriculum, instruction, and concept-based learning. p 30 - 41
  12. 12. Pioneer Life: Lesson Make-Over BEFORE UbD AFTER UbD • Look at the Grade • Discuss the 3 Social Studies changes evident unit in the lesson after • Which of the “twin “Backward sins” are Design” has been represented in this applied lesson?
  13. 13. Backward Design Unit Template Unit Topic: BIG IDEA(S): STAGE 1: Desired Results Prescribed Learning Outcomes: Enduring Understandings: Essential Questions: Knowledge: Skills:
  14. 14. Stage 1: Desired Results Using the Planning Template • Unit Topic • Prescribed Learning Outcomes (Goals) • Big Ideas (Concepts) • Enduring Understandings • Essential Questions • Knowledge and Skills
  15. 15. Meaningful Use of PLOs • Danger of coverage mentality • Need to prioritize & identify BIG IDEAS • Clarity of goal essential for success • Planning for multiple ways of engagement (UDL) – to tap into learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn
  16. 16. BIG IDEAS • Provide a conceptual lens • Are universal and timeless – carry through the ages and across cultures • Are broad, abstract, transferable • Are the “core” of the subject – they need to be uncovered allowing students “dig deep” into learning • Are the building blocks for Enduring Understandings • Examples: equity, good triumphs over evil, problem solving
  17. 17. Finding the Big Ideas: Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs) 1. Select 2-3 related PLOs – Look for a natural link or connection between the content of the PLOs – Select PLOs based on what you know about students’ learning needs, readiness, and interests
  18. 18. Finding the Big Ideas: Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs) 2. Highlight the key (recurring) nouns and adjectives in the PLOs selected 3. Look at the lists of transferable concepts and use the “funnel” questions handout to assist in identifying the Big Ideas (concepts) implied by the nouns and adjectives in the PLOs
  19. 19. Finding the Big Ideas: Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs) 4. Identify a pair (two) concepts that: – Indicate the kind of inquiries that must be made (e.g., compare and contrast) – Suggest the kind of rethinking that learners will need to do in order to understand the ideas and find them useful Wiggins & McTighe (2005). Understanding by Design. P. 69-70
  20. 20. Unpacking PLOs: Grade 3 Example PLOs for Grade 3 Social Studies • B1: Identify changes that can occur in communities over time • B2: Describe the importance of communities • B3: Identify cultural similarities and differences Big Ideas: change, similarities and differences, culture
  21. 21. School Teams: Your Task • Work through the steps of unpacking the PLOs to find the Big Ideas (key concepts).
  22. 22. Finding the Big Ideas: Unpacking the Learning Goals (PLOs) 1. Select 2-3 related PLOs 2. Highlight the key (recurring) nouns and adjectives in the PLOs selected 3. Identify concepts implied by the nouns and adjectives in the PLOs 4. Identify a pair (two) concepts that: - Indicate the kind of inquiries that must be made - Suggest the kind of rethinking that learners will need to do in order to understand the ideas and find them useful
  23. 23. Enduring Understandings What will the students remember for: 40 seconds? 40 minutes? 40 years?
  24. 24. Establishing Curricular Priorities Worth being familiar with Important to know and do Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings
  25. 25. Enduring Understandings Are: • Statements of conceptual relationships – includes two (or more) concepts (Big Ideas) derived from the PLOs • Transfers through time and across cultures and situations • Completes the stem “Students will understand that….” Erickson, L. (2008). Stirring the head, heart and soul: redefining curriculum, instruction, and concept-based learning. p 87-88
  26. 26. Grade 3 Example: PLOs for Grade 3 Social Studies • B1: Identify changes that can occur in communities over time • B2: Describe the importance of communities • B3: Identify cultural similarities and differences Big Ideas: change, similarities and differences, culture Enduring Understanding: Communities change over time to meet people’s needs.
  27. 27. Enduring Understandings Table Work: Sorting Activity • Sort the statements in the envelope on your table into yes examples and no examples of enduring understandings • Generate a list of the attributes of a “good” (exemplar) enduring understanding • Write these attributes on the 11x17 paper on your table
  28. 28. Yes Examples • What we believe is part of who we are. • Homes reflect personal identity and local culture. • Past civilizations shape present day systems and technologies. • Exploration leads to discovery and develops new understandings. • Imagination is a powerful tool for extending our ability to think, create and express ourselves. • Family histories provide an insight into cultural and personal identity. • Communities are enriched by their members and the different perspectives that they bring.
  29. 29. No Examples • Ancient Egyptians had a sophisticated irrigation system. • Explore what an integer is. • My family is special and unique. • Finding peaceful solutions to conflict leads to a better quality of human life. • Mammals have characteristics and needs. • Communities would be enriched if everybody just got along! • Do you really know who your parents are? • It is important to preserve local ecosystems.
  30. 30. Handout • Compare the attributes listed on the handout to those listed on your chart paper • Enter into a brief dialogue of comparisons between the two… – “I notice that….”
  31. 31. Enduring Understandings • Based on the Big Ideas (concepts) at the heart of the discipline - has enduring value beyond the classroom • Need to be “uncovered” in order to be learned - through sustained inquiry • What we want the students to understand 40 years from now
  32. 32. You’ve got to go below the surface…
  33. 33. Your Task • Using the identified Big Ideas (concepts) write an Enduring Understanding.
  34. 34. Essential Questions • Help us stay focused on the Enduring Understanding • Broad and open-ended • Are arguable and important to argue about • Raise more questions-provoking and sustaining engaged inquiry • Spark meaningful connections • Foster deep and transferable knowledge
  35. 35. Examples of Essential Questions Big Ideas: change, similarities and differences, culture. Enduring Understanding: Communities change over time to meet people’s needs. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: • What defines a community? • What are the similarities and differences between communities? • How and why do communities change? • How do people’s needs affect change in a community? • How do communities reflect the needs of people living in them?
  36. 36. Essential vs. Leading Questions • Essential Questions – Asked to be argued – Designed to “uncover” new ideas, views, lines of arguments. – Set up inquiry, heading to new understandings. • Leading Questions – Asked as a reminder to prompt recall – Designed to ‘cover’ knowledge – Point to a single, straightforward fact-a rhetorical question.
  37. 37. Essential Questions – Concept Attainment No Examples: Yes Examples: • What is foreshadowing? • How do effective writers Can you find an example? hook and hold their readers? • What are some French colloquialisms that native • What distinguishes fluent speakers would use? second language learners from native speakers? • Name four technologies that have improved • Who wins and who loses human life. when technologies change?
  38. 38. Essential Questions – Yes or No? • When was the Canadian Constitution signed? • What are the relationships between popularity and greatness in literature? • What do masks and their use reveal about a culture? • Name six mathematical ideas or discoveries. • What makes writing worth reading? • How should governments balance the rights of individuals with the common good?
  39. 39. Your Task • Design Essential Questions that will help students to understand the Enduring Understanding
  40. 40. Where to Differentiate? Tomlinson & McTighe (2006) Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. p. 36 Fig 3.3
  41. 41. Reflections and Feedback Questions? Remember to put any “Post-It” questions on one of the “Wonder Walls” before you leave! Next Session: February 9th at the LMCC Backward Design Stage Two: Assessment For, As, Of Learning
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