Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Librarians' story of the PDA Service at the University of Queensland Rural Clinical School (Kaye Lasserre, William Chun and Lisa Kruesi)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Librarians' story of the PDA Service at the University of Queensland Rural Clinical School (Kaye Lasserre, William Chun and Lisa Kruesi)

953
views

Published on

Kaye Lasserre, William Chun and Lisa Kruesi …

Kaye Lasserre, William Chun and Lisa Kruesi
University of Queensland

The University of Queensland Library and the School of Medicine conducted the first major Australian trial of Personal Digital Assistants' (PDAs) use by medical students at the Rural Clinical Schoolduring 2003 and 2004. The trial became an ongoing PDA Service from 2005, and its role in enhancing medical education has been demonstrated by continued funding and senior management support.

The PDA Service has helped to provide key health information resources for students on rural placements. Adoption of the Service has addressed some of the equity issues caused by inadequate Information Communication and Technology (ICT) infrastructure beyond urban centres. Rural students' use of information at the point of care facilitates learning and establishes good practice for future clinical decision making.

This presentation will discuss the Rural Clinical School Librarians' story about the implementation of the PDA Service, the lessons learnt and why it was a component of "An Integrated Package of Innovative Rural Medical Education:Enhancing Student Outcomes and Increasing the Rural Medical Workforce", 2006 Carrick Award Winner for Australian University Teaching.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
953
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Librarians’ story of the PDA Service at the University of Queensland Rural Clinical School by Kaye Lasserre, William Chun & Lisa Kruesi NSW Health Libraries Forum Gosford 2007 Focus on the User Environment: Techniques and Technologies
  • 2. Abstract
    • Librarians’ story of the PDA Service at the University of Queensland Rural Clinical School
    • The University of Queensland Library and the School of Medicine conducted the first major Australian trial of Personal Digital Assistants' (PDAs) use by medical students at the Rural Clinical School during 2003 and 2004.  The trial became an ongoing PDA Service from 2005, and its role in enhancing medical education has been demonstrated by continued funding and senior management support.
    • The PDA Service has helped to provide key health information resources for students on rural placements.  Adoption of the Service has addressed some of the equity issues caused by inadequate Information Communication and Technology (ICT) infrastructure beyond urban centres.  Rural students’ use of information at the point of care facilitates learning and establishes good practice for future clinical decision making. This presentation will discuss the Rural Clinical School Librarians' story about the implementation of the PDA Service, the lessons learnt and why it was a component of "An Integrated Package of Innovative Rural Medical Education: Enhancing Student Outcomes and Increasing the Rural Medical Workforce", 2006 Carrick Award Winner for Australian University Teaching. 
  • 3. Outline
    • Background
    • PDA Project - objectives and overview
    • Key Findings
    • PDA Service
    • Lessons Learnt – issues and solutions
    • Future
  • 4.  
  • 5. UQ School of Medicine
    • Operates throughout Queensland
    • Offers the postgraduate medical (MBBS) program
    • Clinical Schools provide teaching, learning and research activities
  • 6. Rural Clinical School
    • Fourteen Rural Clinical
    • Schools in Australia
    • University of Queensland
    • Rural Clinical School
    • located at South West
    • and Central Queensland
  • 7.  
  • 8. PDA Project
    • Issues of access to information in rural and remote areas
    • Successful PDA implementations
    • No significant trials in Australian medical schools
    • Funding opportunity arose
  • 9. Project Objectives
    • Provide access to authoritative, evidence-based information to medical students at their point of learning
    • Contribute to a positive rural medical education experience and address equity issues for students in remote or isolated areas and have limited access to information and technology infrastructure
    • Optimise the application of contemporary information and telecommunications technologies in healthcare education and to prepare students for the practicing medicine in 21 st Century
    • Provide a platform for the University of Queensland, School of Medicine to evaluate and report on the applicability of th is technology to the teaching and learning environment
    • Provide the University of Queensland, School of Medicine and the University Library with experience in the provision resources, training and support for PDAs
  • 10. Project Phase
    • March to December 2004
    • 95 units distributed
    • Participants - 3 rd and 4 th year
    • medical students and staff
    • of the Rural Clinical School
    • Training and support by
    • Librarians
  • 11. Project Resources
    • MIMS for PDA (including MIMS Interact )
    • Micromedex (drug information database)
    • Textbooks
      • Oxford handbook of clinical medicine
      • Oxford handbook of clinical specialties
      • Oxford concise medical dictionary
    • Archimedes ( Clinical calculator)
    • Clinical Evidence
    • *UpToDate
    • *Harrisons on Hand
    • Adobe Acrobat and the Mobipocket readers
    • Outlook contacts and academic calendar
  • 12.
    • A day in the life of a medical student using a PDA MBBS 3, Rural Clinical School, Toowoomba
    • Ward rounds – medicine
      • how to diagnose suspected rheumatoid arthritis
      • Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine
    • Clinical question : endocervical swabs vs urinalysis
      • reminder to look up later
    • What does xanthelasma mean and indicate?
      • Oxford Concise Medical Dictionary
    • Drugs drugs drugs…losartan
      • Australian Medicines Handbook
      • precautions and interactions
      • dosages
  • 13. PDA Usage 64% 14% 10% 12% Once a week or less Several times a day Several times a week Once a day Never use it
  • 14. Use of Information Resources 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Oxford Concise Medical Dictionary Archimedes medical calculator MIMs on PDA MIMs Interact on PDA Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine Oxford Handbook of Clinical Specialities Useful Very useful
  • 15. Perceived Value of Technology
  • 16. Access and EBM
    • Research indicates many clinical questions go unanswered
    • Lack of access to information a factor
    • ‘ Just in time’ education to keep up-to-date with medical knowledge
    • Use PDA to learn on the spot or record questions for later study
    • Integrate learning/CPD with daily clinical work
  • 17. Access Enhances Learning
    • Do you think that access to the reference materials on the PDA contributes to your educational experience?
    • 86% agreed
    • Value of learning in context
    • “ Yes. It can make clinical situations teaching moments when questions can be explored with the clinician in combination with PDA resources”
    • “ Access information quicker and still in the clinical context, therefore it is more relevant. I am more likely to look something up if I don’t have to remember to look it up later”
    • “ Yes, definitely. It enables answers to some questions immediately – particularly for drug information or quick reminders of different diseases, so can better apply knowledge to that patient straight away”
  • 18. Organisation, IT and Equity
    • “ I found the PDA very useful in terms of organisation. It’s probably the most organised I’ve been in the last three years…”
    • “ Encouraging use of IT in clinical practice at a time when, as a student you are still working out a routine and are able to incorporate the use into your practice.”
    • “ The nurses are all asking me for advice about drugs and don’t realise that the only reason that I can come up with answers is the PDA on my belt! Well, not always the only reason - but often!”
  • 19. Summary
    • PDAs, by optimising access to information
    • support EBM and improve the performance of a clinician
    • enhance student learning by facilitating learning in context
  • 20. PDA Service
    • Project became ongoing service in 2005 for permanent students
    • Focus changed in 2006
    • Distribution to 3 rd year students doing Rural Medicine Rotation
    • Five rotations per year
    • All 3 rd year medical
    • students can try a PDA
  • 21. PDA Resources
    • The Oxford handbook of clinical medicine
    • The Oxford concise medical dictionary
    • Australian medicines handbook
    • Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) Clinical Guidelines
    • Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia
      • (RCPA) Handbook
    • Archimedes clinical calculator
  • 22. Use On Rural Rotation
    • Aust Med Handbook – Med Super asked me what were the normal dosages of an anti-elliptic and I was able to inform him using the PDA. He now wants to get some for his staff.
    • Medical dictionary – whilst in consultations with my preceptor so I didn’t interrupt, but could follow the case accurately.
  • 23.
      • Hardware choice – why PDA and not laptop
        • Characteristics needed
      • Operating System choice – why MS over Palm
        • Past versus present and future
      • Information access
        • Standalone
        • Network
    Lessons Learnt: Procurement
  • 24.
    • Point of care and Reference/study
    • Value/cost and Overlap
    • User interface
    • Licence issues
    • Palm docs (.pdb) – using eReader on Pocket PCs
    • Publishing for mobile devices
    Lessons Learnt: Information Resources
  • 25.  
  • 26.
    • Initial set up and packaging:
      • Create image – tasks, contacts
      • Exceptions to initial load and Serials
      • Registry edits – scroll bars, 802.11g….
      • Final image
    • Turnover process:
      • Re-imaging, cleaning and other administrative tasks
      • Hardware servicing
      • Hiring students
    Lessons Learnt: Roll-out and Maintenance
  • 27.
    • Projection (MS Remote Display Control)
    • Target audience:
      • No PDA exposure…….experienced users
    • Training aims:
      • Familiarisation of the PDA and the information resources
      • 2. Apply Adult Learning Principles to up the “personal motivation” to:
        • want to take a PDA
        • use the information resources on the PDA
    • Improve focus:
          • Testimonials: to show value of PDA to previous students
          • Role play examples: clinical usage scenario
          • Work sheet: helps resource familiarisation
    Lessons Learnt: Distribution and Training
  • 28.
    • Support at a distance
      • Phone/email support
      • User re-imaging
      • Exchange SD cards
      • Faults and solutions log
    • Continuous improvement
      • Return surveys
        • Resource selection
        • Improve training
      • Fault reporting (Quality Control and Quality Assurance)
      • Find more uses (Value adding)
      • Faults and solutions log
    Lessons Learnt: Support and Improvements
  • 29. Future
    • Stand alone versus Wireless Wide Area Network (WAN) resources
    • End of the road for pure PDAs?
    • Move to:
      • Convergence devices / Smartphones
      • Tablets/Laptops
    • Role of Librarians
  • 30. References
    • Ely JW, Osheroff JA, Ebell MH, Chambliss ML, Vinson DC, Stevermer JJ, Pifer EA.Obstacles to answering doctors’ questions about patient care with evidence: qualitative study. BMJ . 2002 Mar 23;324(7339):710
    • Green ML, Ruff TR. Why do residents fail to answer their clinical questions? A qualitative study of barriers to practicing evidence-based medicine. Acad Med . 2005 Feb;80(2):176-82
  • 31. Acknowledgements
    • Professor Peter Baker,
    • Associate Professor Bruce Chater,
    • Dr Di Eley,
    • Ms Donna Georgeson,
    • Ms Janelle Coe,
    • Mr Keith Webster
    • Mrs Janine Schmidt,
    • Ms Heather Todd,
    • Mr Andrew Heath,
    • Ms Yasmin Childs,
    • Mr Daryl Healing.
  • 32. Questions
  • 33. Further information
    • Kaye Lasserre
      • [email_address]
    • William Chun
      • [email_address]
    • Lisa Kruesi
      • [email_address]