Criterion- based assessment  forms for prevocational           trainees
In NSW, in research conducted in 2010 (and reported at the last Forum), we reviewed prevocational assessment forms complet...
Our aim is to find better methods of assessment for prevocational trainees. Among our underlying assumptions, we think tha...
This graph shows the main result from our first study. It shows the overall performance ratings by trainee self‐assessment...
However, these forms provide plenty of room for written comments intended to give trainees specific advice about their str...
We found that supervisors typically did not write much on the forms, and that what was written, while encouraging in a gen...
In relation to the four purposes of assessment, we concluded that the assessment forms as they were actually used in the f...
Our hypothesis is that at least part of the problem with the current form relates to the 4‐point rating scale, “Below expe...
In consultation with DPETs, the Prevocational Training Council and the JMO Forum, we redesigned the assessment forms to pr...
The overall assessment is based on assessment of thirteen specific items, listed here, each with its specific description ...
Here is one of the simpler assessment items. It is our hope that both the trainee and the supervisor will be able to make ...
Here is one of the more complex assessment items. For some assessment items, we thought it was necessary to provide a choi...
OK, so we are now in the initial stages of testing these new forms to see if they should be changed further and whether th...
As I said, we have not collected much data yet, but if the trend so far continues, we might have some difficult decisions ...
... Because our users are quite divided in their responses. When you look at the reasons given by respondents, there are c...
The reasons given by supervisors and trainees were similarOld forms more succinct, more concise (this is true – there are ...
assessment and supervisor assessment on separate documents, thereby doubling the paper from 4 to 8 pages, but it would hav...
The reasons given by supervisors and trainees were similarNew forms more detailed and comprehensiveNew forms give better o...
What the taste test has told us so far, I think, is that the devil is in the detail.There is plenty of room for further ti...
To concludeThere isn’t a clear preference in the user group for the new form.But in fact this kind of taste test is not th...
work with other jurisdictions on research in improving assessment. It is a difficult area, but very important, because ass...
In NSW, in research conducted in 2010 (and reported at the last Forum), we reviewed prevocational assessment forms complet...
I might add that we now know from John Collins’ review of the Foundation Programme in the UK that fixing assessment is not...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Criterion Based Assessment Forms

966

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
966
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Criterion Based Assessment Forms

  1. 1. Criterion- based assessment forms for prevocational trainees
  2. 2. In NSW, in research conducted in 2010 (and reported at the last Forum), we reviewed prevocational assessment forms completed by prevocational trainees and found that, as currently used by trainees and supervisors, the assessment forms may under‐report trainee underperformance, do not discriminate strongly between different levels of performance of trainees or the training system, and do not provide trainees with enough specific feedback to guide their professional development.The results of that study, which looked at over 3000 assessment forms, were subsequently published in the MJA. I have distributed some copies of that paper, and also copies of the red end‐term assessment form we evaluated then, and a new set of forms that we are going to talk about today. Please share copies with your neighbours if necessary. 1
  3. 3. Our aim is to find better methods of assessment for prevocational trainees. Among our underlying assumptions, we think that these are the purposes of assessment.1. Formative: to guide the trainee’s professional development. 2. Safety: to identify safety concerns and underperformance issues. 3. Summative: to document satisfactory performance  (certification/registration/progression). 4. Systemic: to identify strengths and weaknesses of the education and  training process.These are four big purposes, and it is quite likely that a range of assessment methods is required to meet all of them. However, in NSW, and I think in other jurisdictions as well, assessment is conducted through a mid‐term formative appraisal and an end‐term summative assessment — two forms, filled out at two interviews between the term supervisor and the trainee. 2
  4. 4. This graph shows the main result from our first study. It shows the overall performance ratings by trainee self‐assessment and supervisor assessment at mid‐term and end‐term. You can see that the lowest rating, 1, below expected level, is virtually unused. Trainees never use it and supervisors use it about one in a thousand times. The borderline rating, 2,  is rarely used –about one in a hundred times. Trainees rate themselves highly and supervisors rate them even more highly – you can see that at end‐term, supervisors rate more trainees as performing above expected level than at expected level.This is the result for the overall performance rating, but a virtually identical graph could be drawn for the 18 specific competency ratings that are also assessed. In summary, At end term, 98.5% of trainees were rated by themselves and by their supervisors as performing at or above the expected level on every item. This starts in term 1 as an intern and continues through to term 5 as a resident. The problem with this rosy picture is that we suspect from other evidence that it is not realistic. A small proportion of trainees at any one time are underperforming on some aspects of their job, but this is not picked up in assessment ratings. 3
  5. 5. However, these forms provide plenty of room for written comments intended to give trainees specific advice about their strengths and weaknesses. Potentially, this could be where the real guidance is. Unfortunately, 3
  6. 6. We found that supervisors typically did not write much on the forms, and that what was written, while encouraging in a general sense, lacked specificity.Coupled with reports from JMOs that supervisors often do not provide much verbal feedback at assessment sessions, this made us fear that the assessment process was sometimes not giving trainees the feedback they need. Feedback is generally agreed to be the most important outcome of assessment as far as trainees are concerned. 4
  7. 7. In relation to the four purposes of assessment, we concluded that the assessment forms as they were actually used in the field were not really working.This is likely to be for several reasons, and we ended our MJA article by saying that “the apparent weakness of the current process may be a measure of the time and engagement that trainees and supervisors bring to written assessment. There is always a risk that filling in forms will be seen as a mere formality. Future research on assessment methods that are sustainable in the clinical environment and supported by trainees and supervisors would be valuable. Changes in the workplace to facilitate adequate time for feedback and assessment may be required, and supervisors may need training in assessment methods.”So, there’s more to this than forms. Nonetheless, we thought it might be worthwhile to try to come up with something better.  5
  8. 8. Our hypothesis is that at least part of the problem with the current form relates to the 4‐point rating scale, “Below expected level”, “Borderline”, “At expected level”, “Above expected level”. This scale is relativistic and may be difficult to apply or interpret. Performing “at expected level” does not indicate a specific level of competence in any of the clinical skills assessed on the form, as the forms are used with trainees from their first term as an intern to their last term as a resident. Different supervisors are likely to have different expectations, and if a trainee is told that they are below expected level, this does not in itself tell them anything about what they should be doing. 6
  9. 9. In consultation with DPETs, the Prevocational Training Council and the JMO Forum, we redesigned the assessment forms to promote criterion‐based assessment. That is, the assessment items provide explicit descriptions of the behaviours that constitute inadequate, not‐quite‐adequate, adequate and excellent performance. In this way, even a “tick‐box” approach to assessment provides some feedback to trainees on their specific performance and the requirements for excellence. The criterion‐based approach is also closer to an explicit judgement of a trainee’s specific level of competence for each of the assessable items on the form. This is not an original approach; it has been used in other situations and by other people. We tried to write descriptive criteria appropriate to the assessment of prevocational trainees.You have copies of our experimental forms in front of you to look at. On this slide, we are looking at the overall performance summative rating item, which has been set up to express results in terms of the trainee’s readiness to progress to the next stage of training.  7
  10. 10. The overall assessment is based on assessment of thirteen specific items, listed here, each with its specific description of performance criteria.  8
  11. 11. Here is one of the simpler assessment items. It is our hope that both the trainee and the supervisor will be able to make a clear choice between each of these levels, that it will be clear what a particular rating means, and that the rating description itself will give the trainee some idea about what behaviour is considered excellent (which in this case, for instance, includes the ability to admit mistakes). 9
  12. 12. Here is one of the more complex assessment items. For some assessment items, we thought it was necessary to provide a choice of descriptors. So, in this case, poor communications could be for various reasons and the assessment form allows for the relevant reasons to be highlighted. 10
  13. 13. OK, so we are now in the initial stages of testing these new forms to see if they should be changed further and whether they have any potential for general use.We asked Directors of Prevocational Education and Training (DPETs) at sites across NSW to try the new forms with a small group of trainees and supervisors in terms 4 and 5. Most of them kindly agreed to help, but many wanted to start in term 5, and we have not collected much data yet.We provided a one page guide to the new forms, briefly explaining the rationale.We asked the trainees and supervisors to fill in a very simple evaluation form, which asked: “Which forms would you prefer to use in the future?” (the old ones  or the new ones). And  “Why?” 11
  14. 14. As I said, we have not collected much data yet, but if the trend so far continues, we might have some difficult decisions ahead of us ... 11
  15. 15. ... Because our users are quite divided in their responses. When you look at the reasons given by respondents, there are clearly two camps. 12
  16. 16. The reasons given by supervisors and trainees were similarOld forms more succinct, more concise (this is true – there are far more words on the new forms)Old forms less tedious (I think that’s important — there is certainly enough tedium in the world)New forms wordier but add no extra information (I find this an amazing comment, but I guess it means that the extra information provided on the new forms had no value to the trainee who made this comment)No need for extra description on new forms as supervisor can add detail in comments if required (this supervisor comment made me think “If only!”)New forms use more paperAndPutting self‐assessment and supervisor assessment on separate forms makes comparison more difficult (on our test forms, we did put self‐ 13
  17. 17. assessment and supervisor assessment on separate documents, thereby doubling the paper from 4 to 8 pages, but it would have been possible to put both on one. Would this have changed perceptions of the size of the form?)Supervisor is familiar with the old form (this trainee comment isn’t much of an objection, is it? Given 12 months, everyone could be familiar with the new form)Harder to see where to tick (another unfamiliarity comment – but it is true that we designed the new form partly in the hope that people would no longer be able to tick straight down one column without stopping to think, so this objection could represent an attitude to assessment that we really don’t want to encourage) 13
  18. 18. The reasons given by supervisors and trainees were similarNew forms more detailed and comprehensiveNew forms give better options for accurate assessmentNew forms more helpful to identify issuesNew forms better for feedback, generate more specific discussion, give clearer adviceNew forms more explicit about what is being assessedThose in favour of the new forms were very much in agreement about why they were better. Some of these people also added the comment that they were harder to fill in than the old forms, but they thought the extra effort was worthwhile.The reasons given in favour of the new forms are gratifying to us, the designers, because they mirror the hopes we had for the form. If only this group was the clear majority, we’d be home and hosed! We’ll see what happens when we get more numbers in.  14
  19. 19. What the taste test has told us so far, I think, is that the devil is in the detail.There is plenty of room for further tinkering with the design of the form and the exact wording of the criteria. Could we reduce the number of questions and still be assessing the important components of trainee performance? Could our criteria statements be briefer? Should self‐assessment be part of summative assessment? Could the summative assessment be made simpler than the formative appraisal? And what are the other things we should be doing to improve assessment processes? We are working on the form because we had evidence that the previous form was not working, but that doesn’t mean that this is the only thing we should be doing. Other things we are thinking about include the possibility of assessing particular competencies in particular terms, such as assessing aseptic technique in the surgical term or prescribing in the medical term. We are thinking about more training for supervisors in how to do assessment, and whether other team members should be contributing more to assessment. 14
  20. 20. To concludeThere isn’t a clear preference in the user group for the new form.But in fact this kind of taste test is not the critical test. What we really want to see with this assessment form is some evidence that assessments are more realistic, and that the guidance they provide to trainees is more useful. Evaluating the quality of guidance will be difficult, but there is one measure of the realism of the new form that will be fairly easy to evaluate.With the old form, both interns and residents tend to receive the same ratings all the time in every term. With the new form, because of the way the criteria are described, we would expect the intern cohort to have lower ratings than the resident cohort, and we would expect trainees to show improving ratings as they progress from term to term. This is something easily testable, although we will need much more data than we have collected so far. I think now might be a good time for questions and comments, except to say that CETI is happy to share this form with other jurisdictions and to  15
  21. 21. work with other jurisdictions on research in improving assessment. It is a difficult area, but very important, because assessment doesn’t just measure trainees. It also measures the effectiveness of our training programs.  15
  22. 22. In NSW, in research conducted in 2010 (and reported at the last Forum), we reviewed prevocational assessment forms completed by prevocational trainees and found that, as currently used by trainees and supervisors, the assessment forms may under‐report trainee underperformance, do not discriminate strongly between different levels of performance of trainees or the training system, and do not provide trainees with enough specific feedback to guide their professional development.The results of that study, which looked at over 3000 assessment forms, were subsequently published in the MJA. I have distributed some copies of that paper, and also copies of the red end‐term assessment form we evaluated then, and a new set of forms that we are going to talk about today. Please share copies with your neighbours if necessary. 16
  23. 23. I might add that we now know from John Collins’ review of the Foundation Programme in the UK that fixing assessment is not simply a matter of adding extra assessments. This slide quotes data presented by John Collins in a talk at CETI recently. In the UK, he told us, “Workplace‐based assessment has been changed to providing opportunities for supervised learning events rather than acting as a component of overall assessment.” That is, less formal written assessment and more opportunities for feedback.Anyway, in NSW there was never much prospect that we were going to introduce such an ambitious scheme of multiple workplace‐based assessments for prevocational trainees. Our 800‐plus term supervisors probably would have stormed the Bastille. But, given that the current forms are not working, we thought it worthwhile to try to come up with something better. So now I want to tell you about our small experiment with a new kind of form. 17

×