Readiness Matters: The Impact of College Readiness on College Persistence and Degree Completion
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Readiness Matters: The Impact of College Readiness on College Persistence and Degree Completion

on

  • 126 views

Presented by ACT, Inc. at the 2014 NPEA conference on April 24-25, 2014 in Minneapolis, MN.

Presented by ACT, Inc. at the 2014 NPEA conference on April 24-25, 2014 in Minneapolis, MN.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
126
Views on SlideShare
122
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

2 Embeds 4

http://algebrahub.com 3
http://www.slideee.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Readiness Matters: The Impact of College Readiness on College Persistence and Degree Completion Readiness Matters: The Impact of College Readiness on College Persistence and Degree Completion Presentation Transcript

  •  Readiness  Ma*ers     The  Impact  of  College  Readiness  on   College  Persistence  and  Degree   Comple8on     April  Hansen   ACT  Client  Rela0ons     april.hansen@act.org    
  • ACT’s  Unique  Vantage  Point     •  The  ACT  Assessment  began  in  1959  to  assess  what  students  have   already  learned  and  are  ready  to  learn  next  to  be  college  and   career  ready.   •  54%  of  the  2013  HS  gradua0ng  class  took  the  ACT:        1.8  million  students     •  ACT  Aspire  (grades  3  &  10)  and  the  ACT  (grade  11  &  12)  form  a   longitudinal  assessment  system  that  can  provide  academic   interven0ons  and  shape  curriculum  to  keep  students  on  track   •  ACT  Engage  Assessment  of  academic  behaviors,  psychosocial   factors    
  • Percentage  of  students  taking  the  ACT  by  State  
  •     The  level  of  prepara0on  a  student  needs  to  be  ready   to  enroll  and  succeed  in—without  remedia/on—a   first-­‐year,  credit-­‐bearing  course  at  two-­‐  or  four-­‐year   ins0tu0ons  or  in  trade  or  technical  schools.     Adopted  by  the  Common  Core  State  Standards  Ini/a/ve     How  do  we  define  College  and  Career  Ready?  
  • 5 ACT College Readiness Benchmarks UPDATED •  Empirically derived •  50% chance of achieving a B or higher or about a 75% chance of achieving a C or higher in the corresponding credit-bearing college course Test College Course ACT Plan The ACT8th Grade 9th Grade English English Composition 13 14 15 18 Math College Algebra 17 18 19 22 Reading Social Sciences 16 17 18 22 Science Biology 18 19 20 23 NEW
  • Statements that describe what students are likely to know and be able to do. 80% of students who achieve a score in this range demonstrate these skills. And statements that provide suggestions to progress to a higher level of achievement
  • What’s  the  number  of  American  high  school   students  who  drop  out  of  school,  every  day,   bored,  frustrated,  or  so  far  behind  that  they’ve   given  up?   Pop  Quiz   6,000  
  • 8   •  Many  students  are  not  prepared  to  meet  the  hurdles  they  face   throughout  the  academic  pipeline,  and  they  don’t  persist  and   succeed.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      NCES  2010   Enter  9th   grade   HS   Graduate   Enter   College   College  Graduate   (Bachelor’s)   ~100%   96.9%   74.9%   52.5%   29.0%   Leaky  Educa0onal  Pipeline  
  • Students  who  are  college/career  ready  when  they  leave   high  school  have  a  significantly  higher  likelihood  of:         Enrolling  in  college  the  fall  following  high  school  graduaZon     PersisZng  to  a  second  year  at  the  same  insZtuZon     Earning  a  grade  of  B  or  higher  in  first-­‐year  college  courses     Earning  a  first-­‐year  college  GPA  of  3.0  or  higher     Not  needing  to  take  a  remedial  courses     GraduaZng  within  150%  of  Zme     Entering  the  job  market  with  significantly  higher  lifeZme  earning   potenZal.   Regardless  of  ethnicity  and  SES  
  • 10 •  Average ACT Composite score of 20.9 h]p://www.act.org/newsroom/data/2013/  
  • First  Genera/on  
  • 13
  • First  Genera/on  
  • 1.     The  strongest  predictors  of  college  persistence  and   degree  comple0on  are:    prior  academic  achievement  and   course  selec0on  (rigorous  high  school  classes).   2.     Prior  academic  achievement  and  cogni0ve  ability   surpass  all  other  factors  in  their  influence  on  student   performance.   3.     Non-­‐academic  factors  can  influence  academic   performance,  reten0on  and  persistence,  but  cannot   subs0tute  for  it.   Research  is  the  FoundaZon  
  • Key  Finding  1   Being  be]er  prepared   academically  for  college  improves   a  student’s  chances  of  comple0ng   a  college  degree.     Benchmarks  ma*er.  
  • College  Success  by  Number  of  ACT   Benchmarks  Met  
  • College  Success  by  ACT  Score/ Benchmark  A]ainment   •  53%  enrolled  in  a  4-­‐year  college   (80%  of  the  students  mee0ng  all  4  CRBs  enrolled  in  a     4  year  college)     •  18%  enrolled  in  a  2-­‐year  college                (6%  of  students  mee0ng  all  4  CRBs  enrolled  in  a                  2-­‐year  college)     •  29%  did  not  enroll  in  college                (43%  of  the  0-­‐1  group  didn’t  go  to  college  at  all)  
  • College  Success  by  ACT  Score/ Benchmark  A]ainment   •  Across  all  outcomes,     – College  success  rates  increased  as  ACT  Composite   score  increased.     – Students  who  met  the  ACT  College  Readiness   Benchmarks  had  higher  success  rates  than  those   who  didn’t.     – The  more  Benchmarks  students  met,  the  higher   the  success  rates.  
  • Coursework  Ma*ers   •  Core  curriculum  taken  vs.  not  taken  (4-­‐3-­‐3-­‐3).     •  HS  mathema0cs  coursework  taken:     –  Less  than  (<)  Algebra  I,  Geometry,  Algebra  II.     –  Algebra  I,  Geometry,  Algebra  II.     –  More  than  (>)  Algebra  I,  Geometry,  Algebra  II.     •  HS  science  coursework  taken     –  Biology   –  Biology,  Chemistry   –  Biology,  Chemistry,  Physics  
  • College  Enrollment/RetenZon  Rates     Math  Course  Sequence   Less than Alg 1, Geom, Alg II Alg 1, Geom, Alg II Alg 1, Geom, Alg II, Other Adv Math Alg 1, Geom, Alg II Other Adv Math, Trig Alg 1, Geom, Alg II, Other Adv Math, Trig, Calc As  the  rigor  of  math  courses  increases,  the  chances   of  college  enrollment/persistence  also  increase.   Enrolled in college first year Re-enrolled in college second year
  • College  Enrollment/RetenZon  Rates     Science  Course  Sequence   As  the  rigor  of  science  courses  increases,  the   chances  of  college  enrollment/persistence  also   increase.   Enrolled in college first year Re-enrolled in college second year Biology Biology and Chemistry Biology, Chemistry, and Physics
  • First  Genera/on  
  • First  Genera/on  
  • Degree  Comple0on  by  HS  Coursework   and  Benchmark  A]ainment  in  Math  
  • Key  Finding  2   Using  mul0ple  measures  of  college   readiness  be]er  informs  the   likelihood  of  a  student  persis0ng   and  succeeding  in  college.  
  • College  Success  by  HS  GPA  and  HS   Coursework   •  Across  all  outcomes,     – Students  with  HSGPAs  ≥  3.50  had  higher  success   rates  than  those  who  had  lower  HSGPAs.     – Students  who  took  the  HS  core  curriculum  had   slightly  higher  rates  than  those  who  didn’t.     – Students  who  took  higher-­‐level  mathema0cs  or   science  courses  had  higher  rates  than  those  who   took  fewer  courses.  
  • Degree  Comple0on  by  HS  GPA  and  ACT  Scores  
  • Key  Finding  3   College  readiness  reduces  gaps  in   college  going  rates,  persistence   and  degree  comple0on  among   racial/ethnic  and  family  income   groups.  
  • 6  year  bachelor’s  degree  comple0on  rates   for  racial/ethnic  and  income  groups  
  • College  Success  by  Family  Income  and   Number  of  ACT  Benchmarks  Met  
  • College  Success  by  Race/Ethnicity  and   Number  of  ACT  Benchmarks  Met  
  • The  Impact  of  Readiness  
  • All College ready in 4 subjects Reductions in Racial/Ethnic Gaps in College Enrollment Associated with Meeting All Four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Enrolled in college first year Gap reduction: 8 percentage points White Underrepresented minorities 75 61 84 78 14 6
  • All College ready in 4 subjects Reductions in Racial/Ethnic Gaps in College Retention Rates Associated with Meeting All Four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Re-enrolled in college second year Gap reduction: 5 percentage points White Underrepresented minorities 74 68 84 83 6 1
  • All College ready in 4 subjects Reductions in Family Income Gaps in College Enrollment Rates Associated with Meeting All Four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Enrolled in college first year Gap reduction: 16 percentage points Highest family income group Lowest family income group 82 58 85 77 24 8
  • All College ready in 4 subjects Reductions in Family Income Gaps in College Retention Rates Associated with Meeting All Four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Re-enrolled in college second year Gap reduction: 5 percentage points Highest family income group Lowest family income group 79 66 86 78 13 8
  • All College ready in 4 subjects Reductions in Racial/Ethnic Gaps in 4-Year College Degree Completion Rates Associated with Meeting All Four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Graduated from college in 4 years Gap reduction: 5 percentage points White Underrepresented minorities 39 26 86 78 13 8
  • Key  Finding  4   Early  monitoring  of  readiness  is   associated  with  increased   college  success.  
  • Catching  up  to  College  Readiness   “…the  level  of  academic  achievement  that   students  a]ain  by  eighth  grade  has  a  larger   impact  on  their  college  and  career  readiness  by   the  0me  they  graduate  from  high  school  than   anything  that  happens  academically  in  high   school”  -­‐-­‐The  Forgo?en  Middle,  p.2    
  • Findings  of  “Catching  Up”  Study   •  Few  Far  Off  Track  students  catch  up  in  middle  or   high  school.     •  Even  in  higher  performing  schools,  the  majority   do  not  get  on  track  to  college  and  career   readiness  in  four  years.     •  There  are  lots  of  Far  Off  Track  students  by  this   defini0on  –  for  example,  40-­‐50%  of  minority   students…     •  …and  they  have  a  low  probability  of  hiqng  the   Benchmark  in  four  years.    
  • College  Success  by  Readiness   Indicators  in  Grades  8,  10,  and  11/12   •  Early  readiness  indicators  are  predic0ve  of   college  success.     •  Early  and  sustained  college  readiness  in  high   school  is  associated  with  persis0ng  to  degree   comple0on.     –  Students  who  were  on  target  early  in  grades  8  and  10   for  becoming  college  and  career  ready  and  then   graduated  from  high  school  college  and  career  ready   had  the  highest  college  success  rates.     –  Students  who  were  not  on  target  in  grades  8,  10,  and   11/12  had  the  lowest  success  rates.  
  • Readiness  Ma]ers  Key  Findings   •  Being  be]er  prepared  academically  for  college   improves  a  student’s  chances  of  comple0ng  a   college  degree.     •  Using  mul0ple  measures  of  college  readiness   be]er  informs  the  likelihood  of  a  student   persis0ng  and  succeeding  in  college.     •  College  readiness  reduces  gaps  in  persistence   and  degree  comple0on  among  racial/ethnic  and   family  income  groups.     •  Early  monitoring  of  readiness  is  associated  with   increased  college  success.    
  • Overall  Recommenda0ons   1.  Evaluate  the  rigor  and  content  of  high  school  courses   in  English,  mathema0cs,  reading,  and  science  and   align  the  curricular  content  with  college  readiness   standards  and  the  skills  that  are  needed  to  be   successful  in  college  and  career.   h]p://www.act.org/standard/   2.  Monitor  early  and  oren  student’s  progress  towards   becoming  ready  for  college  and  intervene  with   students  who  are  not  on  target  while  there  is  s0ll   0me  for  them  to  catch  up  before  they  graduate  from   high  school  
  • Overall  Recommenda0ons   3.  Help  students  develop  strong  academic  behaviors   that  can  enhance  student  success.   h]p://www.act.org/engage/     4.      Provide  all  students  with  educa0onal  and  career               guidance  by  doing  the  following:     –  Help  them  to  understand  how  preparing  well  now  academically  is   cri0cal  for  accomplishing  their  future  career  goals.     –  Encourage  them  to  explore  personally-­‐relevant  career  op0ons  based   on  their  own  skills,  interests,  and  aspira0ons.     –  h]p://www.act.org/profile/   –  Make  available  useful  informa0on  and  resources  about  the  college   admissions  process  and  financial  aid  process  to  them  and  their   parents,  and  assist  them  with  these  processes   –  h]p://www.actstudent.org/  
  • Ques0ons/Comments   April  Hansen   Client  Rela0ons   april.hansen@act.org