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Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011
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Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers - SXSH 2011

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  • Conditions with highest prevalence are not necessarily the most discussed online. Conversation is greatest for conditions that require ongoing management, often through a combination of prescription and OTC treatments and lifestyle changes.Lower prevalence often leads to greater online engagement, with a larger share of the condition universe participating in social media about the condition and a greater volume of buzz relative to the number of diagnosed patients.Aside from end-of-life conditions or conditions affecting the very young or the very old, patients themselves drive the majority of online conversation.HCP involvement in social media discussions on public forums remains minimal. HCPs more often congregate on private, HCP-only boards and seldom communicate directly with patients.Across conditions, patients and caregivers primarily seek the experiences of trusted peers through the disease journey. However, there are significant differences by condition in what patients seek to accomplish through social media, how they use different social channels, and how they think about doctors, medicine, alternative treatments, and the pharma industry. Understanding these differences can lead to a deeper knowledge of patients and their victories, pain points and unmet needs.
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    • 1. Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers<br />Melissa Davies<br />Strategic Account Director, Healthcare<br />September 19, 2011<br />
    • 2. Introducing NM Incite<br />Trusted data provider, leveraging proprietary technology and buzz sources from 160+ million social media sites – across Twitter, Facebook, blogs, message boards, and customer reviews Global reach, in 18 countries (and growing)<br />Access to Nielsen’s proprietary consumer panels for online, TV, and retail purchases<br />Benchmarks and insights from over 150 clients, especially in health care, CPG, retail, auto, CE, Financial services<br />Market leader in enterprise social media monitoring/ analytics (Source: Forrester)<br />Industry-leading expertise in digital marketing, product development, and service operations<br />Capability-buildinginitiatives to enable incorporation of social media into core organizational processes<br />Functional expertise in translating social media metrics and insights into action and sustained improvement<br />
    • 3. The state of social media today<br />Getting Started<br />3<br />
    • 4. Social networks and blogs are still the top destination online<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 5. Females and 18-34 year olds most active social networkers<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 6. U.S. Internet users spent more time on Facebook than any other web brand<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 7. Emerging social network<br />Tumblr nearly tripled its unique U.S. audience over the last year<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 8. Mobile social media use is on the rise<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 9. Social networking app usage is up 30%<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 10. More women view video on social networks, but men watch longer<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 11. Active social media users are influential offline<br />SOURCE: Nielsen/NM Incite, The State of the Media: The Social Media Report, September 2011<br />
    • 12. Healthcare social media: who is talking, and how much?<br />12<br />Analyzing the Online Conversation<br />
    • 13. Health discussion volume by condition<br />13<br />
    • 14. Depression<br />Prevalence<br />Hodgkin’s Lymphoma<br />Lung Cancer<br />Prostate Cancer<br />Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma<br />Hypertension<br />Asthma<br />Bipolar Disorder<br />Ovarian Cancer<br />Type 1 Diabetes<br />Colorectal Cancer<br />Cardiovascular Disease<br />COPD<br />Brain Cancer<br />Multiple Sclerosis<br />Fibromyalgia<br />Alzheimer’s Disease<br />Breast Cancer<br />Ulcerative Colitis<br />Type 2 <br />Diabetes<br />Rheumatoid Arthritis<br />ADHD<br />Arthritis<br />Key:<br />Cardiovascular<br />Chronic Condition<br />Mental Health<br />Oncology<br />Pain<br />Cystic Fibrosis<br />SOURCE: NM Incite custom analysis of online discussion within healthcare-relevant boards, blogs and groups, Jan. 2-Dec. 31, 2010<br />
    • 15. 50%<br />Patients drive online discussion<br />Share of Discussion Contributed by Patient/Caregiver/HCP, by Condition<br />SOURCE: NM Incite custom analysis; speaker demographics are qualitatively assessed<br />
    • 16. Two cancers, different discussion<br />Volume of discussion<br />Prevalence:Authors<br />Breast Cancer<br /><ul><li>Discussion feels hopeful: “no longer a death sentence”
    • 17. Largely patient-driven
    • 18. Highly engaged</li></ul>Breast Cancer: 124,000 messages<br />Brain Cancer<br /><ul><li>High level of fear and frustration
    • 19. Highly caregiver-driven
    • 20. Very highly engaged</li></ul>Brain Cancer: 22,800 messages<br />SOURCES: Cancer prevalence data: US National Cancer Institute&apos;s Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), 2007. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010.<br />
    • 21. Sampling the conversation<br />Brain Cancer<br />“Brain cancer is so awful. My mom is still in treatment, she has about 10 more avastin treatments left. She is 72, somewhat weak, hardly talks because she can&apos;t think of the right word to say and does nothing but sit in a chair all day and look out the window. I wonder what will happen once treatment ends, will she get any better or can we expect more of the same for the rest of her life.” CancerCompass.com, 2011-01-13<br />Breast Cancer<br />“I can related to the emotions impact of breast cancer  you are feeling , I was shocked, scared, angry, overwhelmed , crushed , hopeless, when the doctors informed me … in order for me to survive this I had to take life with cancer one day at a time , surrounded myself with family, friends , prayer and faith . … you are not along in this fight , I will keep you and your family in my prayers.” National Breast Cancer Foundation Forums, 2011-01-29<br />
    • 22. Key takeaways<br />Conditions with highest prevalence are not necessarily the most discussed online<br />Lower prevalence often leads to greater online engagement<br />Aside from end-of-life conditions or conditions affecting the very young or the very old, patients themselves drive the majority of online conversation<br />HCP involvement in social media discussions on public forums remains minimal<br />Personal experience remains the currency of healthcare social media<br />18<br />
    • 23. Questions? Thank you!<br />Melissa.Davies@nmincite.com<br />@MelissaKDavies<br />19<br />State of the Media: The Social Media Report Q3 2011<br />http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/social/<br />Healthcare Social Media by the Numbers<br />http://www.nmincite.com<br />

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