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Storyboards 16 57-16
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Storyboards 16 57-16

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Transcript

  • 1. Storyboards
    • [email_address]
  • 2. What is a Storyboard?
    • By definition, a storyboard is your story in a visual form
    • It details the ‘keyframes’ of action in a given story
  • 3. Why?
    • The storyboard allows financiers to visualize a story that they may only have seen in written form
    • A storyboard ensures that all movie crew understand what is required in the shot
  • 4. Storyboards
    • Storyboards are found in all moving image productions (other than live events)
    • They prepare the crew with the needs/ demands of the director who furnishes ‘ the vision ’
  • 5. Storyboard Tools
    • Storyboard
    • Pencil
    • Synopsis/ Script
    • Direction from team (director, cameraman, cinematographer etc.)
  • 6. Tips for Successful Storyboarding
    • Drawing skills help, but are not essential
    • Vision!
    • A good understanding of camera framing
    • Communicate ideas amongst the team
  • 7. Storyboard Format
    • Big, medium, small- it’s up to you!
    • Clarity
    • The important thing is that nothing is left to chance on the day of shooting!
  • 8. Types of Storyboard
  • 9. Storyboard Tip 1
    • Bring your world into 3 dimensions:
    • Interesting camera angles = interesting films
  • 10. Storyboard Tip 2
    • Frame the shot to show emphasis on the character or moment in time:
  • 11. Another Example:
  • 12. Another Example
  • 13. Storyboard Tip 2:
    • Don’t cut the heads off your characters:
  • 14. Showing Camera Movements
    • Showing camera moves adds a dynamic element to your storyboarding and informs camera crew what is required for set-up:
  • 15. Pan
  • 16. Push, Drift, Truck
  • 17. Transitions
  • 18. Transitions 2
  • 19. Focus
    • What are we really looking at in the scene?
  • 20. Focus 2
    • Another example:
  • 21. The Camera Line
  • 22. Shots (briefly!)
  • 23. Shots Cont.
    • Long Shot/ Establishing Shot: Tells audience where we are who is there and where they are in relation to each other.
    • Medium Shot: Used when characters become more important than places
    • Close Up: Emphasizing emotion or tense moments in the story.
  • 24. Q&A
    • Any Questions?