Duality in change

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This is a short presentation that Helen Bevan made to Masters students at the University of Jönköping, Sweden on 16th January 2014. The theme of the talk was “duality” in change;
• hierarchy versus network
• transitional versus transformational

This isn’t a trade-off to be made. As leaders of change, we need to work with the strengths of both and manage the tensions between them.

Helen Bevan is Chief of Service Transformation, working in the Horizons Group at NHS Improving Quality, the national improvement body that supports the NHS in England. Follow her on Twitter @HelenBevan

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Duality in change

  1. 1. Some ideas about large scale change presentation to Masters students at the University of Jönköping, 16th January 2014 Helen Bevan @HelenBevan @helenbevan
  2. 2. Emerging themes in change and transformation Emerging direction Dominant approach Organisation Power through hierarchy Mission and vision Making sense through rational argument Leadership-driven (top down) innovation Tried and tested, based on experience Transactions @helenbevan Source: @HelenBevan Community Power through connection Shared purpose Making sense through emotional connection Viral (grass-roots driven) creativity “ Open” approaches , sharing ideas & data, co-creating change Relationships
  3. 3. John Kotter: “Accelerate!” • We won’t create big change through hierarchy on its own • We need hierarchy AND network • Many change agents, not just the usual few • Changing our mindset • From “have to” to “want to” • Head and heart, not just head and @helenbevan
  4. 4. The Network Secrets of Great Change Agents As a change agent, my centrality in the informal network is far more important than my position in the formal hierarchy Julie Battilana &Tiziana Casciaro @helenbevan
  5. 5. Two kinds of system-level problems A difficulty • Broad agreement on the nature of the problem • Some understanding of what the solution might look like • Clarity about the time and resources required to solve the problem Source: System Failure - Why Governments must learn to think differently, Jake Chapman, published by Demos @helenbevan
  6. 6. Two kinds of system-level problems A difficulty A mess • Broad agreement on the nature of the problem • Some understanding of what the solution might look like • Clarity about the time and resources required to solve the problem • No clear agreement about exactly what the problem is • Ambiguity about how improvements might be made • Unbounded in terms of the in terms of the time and resources it could absorb, the scope of enquiry needed to understand or resolve it, and the number of people that may need to be involved Source: System Failure - Why Governments must learn to think differently, Jake Chapman, published by Demos @helenbevan
  7. 7. Different thinking for different results Transitional change “Designing a co-ordinated system” @helenbevan
  8. 8. Different thinking for different results Transitional change “Designing a co-ordinated system” @helenbevan A focus on methods, systems, and behaviours Improving what we know already (structures, systems, implementing best practices) New payment systems Refining incentives Measures of success Make the current system “leaner” and less wasteful Performance improvement
  9. 9. Different thinking for different results Transformational change Building an enduring capacity for change @helenbevan
  10. 10. Different thinking for different results Transformational change Changing the way we think about the problem Not just changing behaviours but beliefs and assumptions Exploring unusual and innovative alternatives • Requires a high tolerance for ambiguity and paradox • Shifting power by designing a truly person-centred system • Continuously learns, adapts and improves Building an enduring capacity for change @helenbevan

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