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  • The city has a tradition of developing comprehensive plans dating back to 1913. The last plan, adopted in 1989, is almost 20 years old. Much has changed in that time. Since 1980, the City ’ s population has more than doubled from approximately 150,000 to ~370,000. During the same period, the City ’ s land area has almost tripled in size from approximately 55 to 140 square miles. Clearly, the City ’ s land area is growing faster than its population – consuming more land. The Comprehensive Plan needs to be updated to better address the issues and challenges the city faces today and tomorrow – such as incorporating green and sustainable principles, addressing transit and transportation, the coordination of land use and infrastructure, the development of new communities, the conservation of existing neighborhoods, and the renaissance of downtown.
  • The growth of Raleigh has been extraordinary. This series of images shows the development of the city from 1793 to the present.
  • The growth of Raleigh has been extraordinary. This series of images shows the development of the city from 1793 to the present.
  • The growth of Raleigh has been extraordinary. This series of images shows the development of the city from 1793 to the present.
  • The growth of Raleigh has been extraordinary. This series of images shows the development of the city from 1793 to the present.
  • The growth of Raleigh has been extraordinary. This series of images shows the development of the city from 1793 to the present.

SSC2011_Kenneth Bowers PPT SSC2011_Kenneth Bowers PPT Presentation Transcript

  • Zoning for Compact, Sustainable Development in Raleigh Ken Bowers, AICP Deputy Planning Director City of Raleigh
  • Outline
    • Why Raleigh is relevant
    • Raleigh ’ s Comprehensive Plan
    • Features of Raleigh’s New Development Code
    • What’s not in the code, and why
  • Projected Growth by Region (2000-2030)
  • Raleigh ’ s Population Growth
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  • Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled Per Capita
    • 8.7 more miles than national norm
    • 6.4 more miles than peer metros
    • 4.4 more miles than the average of the 10 most sprawling metros on the Rutgers sprawl index
    Source: Texas Transportation Institute, “ 2005 Urban Mobility Study. ”
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  • Six Vision Themes Define the Plan
    • Economic Prosperity & Equity
    • Expanding Housing Choices
    • Managing Our Growth
    • Coordinating Land Use & Transportation
    • Greenprint Raleigh—Sustainable Development
    • Growing Successful Neighborhoods & Communities
  • Growth Framework Map
    • 15 Land Use Categories
    • 5 residential categories
    • 5 mixed-use categories
    • 3 non-residential “ employment ” categories
    • 2 public and institutional categories
    • 2 park and open space categories
    • 1 “ special study area ” category
  • Transit and Land Use
  • “ Codes are just that: the DNA of our cities. ” — Andres Duany, Duany Plater-Zyberk “ If the Comprehensive Plan embodies the vision of what Raleigh can become, the UDO constitutes the city's DNA. ” — Mack Paul, News & Observer, March 4, 2010
  • Consultant Team
  • 3 Big Problems with the Current Code
    • A “ context free, ” one-size-fits-all approach to a diverse landscape
    • Discretionary review substituting for adequate standards
    • Incompatibility between the zoning districts and adopted land use plans
  • Key Features of Raleigh’s New Code
    • Standards, not incentives
    • Height and form, not density and FAR
    • As-of-right, not discretionary decisions
    Right Rules, Right Places
  • Proposed UDO Districts Residential Mixed-Use Special Overlay R-1 R-2 R-4 R-6 R-10 RX Residential NX Neighborhood OP Office Park OX Office CX Commercial DX Downtown IX Industrial AP Agriculture CM Conservation R-MP Manuf. Hsg. CMP Campus IH Heavy Industry PD Planned Dev SHOD-1,2 HOD, HOD-2 NCOD MPOD WPOD AOD TOD
  • Height & Frontage in Mixed-Use Districts Sample District: CX-5-PL * Height cannot exceed 3 or 5 stories in NX Use Height Frontage RX NX* OP OX CX DX IX -3 -5 -7 -12 -20 -40 P Parkway D Detached PL Parking Limited G Green UL Urban Limited UG Urban General S Shopfront
  • Suburban Frontages
  • Urban Frontages
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  • Building Types
  • Expanded Housing Options
    • Cottage Court, Backyard Cottage
  • Block Sizes and Peremiters
  • Street cross sections and connections
  • Multimodal Transportation Options
    • Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities
  • Parking Reductions Downtown DX District Urban Frontage Ground floor retail exemption Small project exemption Flat ratio for non-residential Reduced requirements for residential Bus Transit 10% reduction with 15 minute headways Affordable Housing 20% reduction TOD Overlay Same as downtown plus parking maximum of 1 space/300 square feet
  • Areas of Change
  • What’s not in the Code?
    • Inclusionary zoning. There is no enabling authority for mandatory inclusionary zoning in North Carolina.
    • Density bonuses. There are no density bonuses for things such as affordable housing or LEED certification.
      • Undermine the goal of good urban form and predictability
      • Contrary to the statutory purpose that zoning districts be drawn with “reasonable consideration…as to the character of the district and it’s peculiar suitability for particular uses...”
  • Zoning for Compact, Sustainable Development in Raleigh Ken Bowers, AICP Deputy Planning Director City of Raleigh