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SSC2011_Hilari Varnadore PPT

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  • ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability USA is a membership association of local governments committed to advancing climate protection and sustainable development. For nearly 20 years, ICLEI has pioneered the agenda, practices, and technical tools for local climate action and urban sustainability, both in the United States and worldwide. The member network reflects the diversity of U.S. cities and counties from across the nation in size and geographic location, from New York City to Cimarron, NM a community of 830 and from Los Angeles County, the biggest local government in the U. S. to Blaine County, Idaho.
  • ICLEI’s membership in the United States includes more than 600 strong representing nearly 30 percent of the U.S. population, up 25% in 2009. The local governments who comprise these numbers are also part of a strong and growing network that is a powerful collective force for change. ICLEI USA serves our nationwide network through 8 regional offices that convene members, create opportunities for peer-to-peer networking, offer education and training, and provide technical services to support member efforts. Regional Office Locations California (Oakland & Los Angeles) 163 23% Midwest (Chicago) 78 24% Northeast & Mid-Atlantic (Boston & New York) 179 30% Pacific Northwest & Islands (Seattle) 60 7% South Central (Houston) 22 67% Southeast (Atlanta) 59 27% West (Denver) 39 22%
  • The STAR Community Index is a ground-breaking rating system and performance management tool that will offer local governments a roadmap for improving community sustainability by addressing the intertwining facets—economic, environmental and social concerns. Built by and for local governments, STAR is a program of ICLEI USA initiated with the U.S. Green Building Council (USBGC), the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the National League of Cities (NLC). Each organization brings its unique strength and expertise to the partnership: ICLEI and NLC serve a customer base of local governments that are seeking a shared framework for sustainability; USGBC contributes its experience with the consensus process and development of performance standards; and CAP develops progressive policies to influence the national agenda.  
  • The STAR Community Index is a ground-breaking rating system and performance management tool that will offer local governments a roadmap for improving community sustainability by addressing the intertwining facets—economic, environmental and social concerns. Built by and for local governments, STAR is a program of ICLEI USA initiated with the U.S. Green Building Council (USBGC), the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the National League of Cities (NLC). Each organization brings its unique strength and expertise to the partnership: ICLEI and NLC serve a customer base of local governments that are seeking a shared framework for sustainability; USGBC contributes its experience with the consensus process and development of performance standards; and CAP develops progressive policies to influence the national agenda.  
  • The STAR Community Index is a ground-breaking rating system and performance management tool that will offer local governments a roadmap for improving community sustainability by addressing the intertwining facets—economic, environmental and social concerns. Built by and for local governments, STAR is a program of ICLEI USA initiated with the U.S. Green Building Council (USBGC), the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the National League of Cities (NLC). Each organization brings its unique strength and expertise to the partnership: ICLEI and NLC serve a customer base of local governments that are seeking a shared framework for sustainability; USGBC contributes its experience with the consensus process and development of performance standards; and CAP develops progressive policies to influence the national agenda.  
  • ICLEI USA has unparalleled experience engaging and guiding our members on taking significant action to quantify and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions while decreasing operational costs, improving economic stability, and enhancing overall community livability. The foundation of our experience is helping members progress through a proven Five Milestone process, a systematic and performance based approach where each step builds on the last – from conducting an assessment to establish a baseline to evaulating and reporting performance achievements.
  • ICLEI USA has unparalleled experience engaging and guiding our members on taking significant action to quantify and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions while decreasing operational costs, improving economic stability, and enhancing overall community livability. The foundation of our experience is helping members progress through a proven Five Milestone process, a systematic and performance based approach where each step builds on the last – from conducting an assessment to establish a baseline to evaulating and reporting performance achievements.
  • The STAR Community Index is being development through a robust stakeholder engagement process that draws on local expertise, responds to the diversity of local approaches and conditions, and builds a constituency of early adopters. The stakeholders represent more than 150 volunteer committee members that represent 130 organizations. Nearly half of the committee members represent local governments – to ensure that the program is being developed “by and for local governments.” Stakeholders include: 60 cities and 10 counties state and federal agencies including EPA, DOE, CDC and NOAA non-profit organizations national associations Universities Utilities private corporations. The Steering Committee governs development and provides strategic direction on the scope, design and function of the program. Technical Advisory Committees are developing the goals and measures that define the STAR system. ICLEI researched local government priorities and the Steering Committee provided input on issues to address in the STAR framework. These were organized into disciplines and areas of expertise, and from this eight Technical Advisory Committees were established and organized under the three pillars of sustainability – environment, economy and society.
  • Guiding principles were established to make manifest the concepts and values that underpin STAR and community-scale sustainability. Each principle transcends the three facets of sustainability – and is accompanied by a descriptive statement. As an example: Embrace Diversity Sustainable communities feature a tapestry of peoples, cultures and economies, underpinned by a richly functioning natural environment. Local governments in these communities celebrate and foster ethnic, cultural, economic and biological diversity, are actively inclusive, and encourage multiple approaches to accomplish a goal. The Guiding Principles make explicit these shared values and will influence the development of goals and measures. They will also serve as an evaluation tool for resolving potential conflicts (alignment). The Guiding Principles offer benefits to STAR’s target audience by providing transparency on the values and thought processes that STAR embodies and provides inspiration for change.
  • The framework structure is similar to the LEED Green Building Rating System, and yet tailored to reflect the needs of local governments. The structure features a set of components that reflect public sector mechanisms that are effective at advancing change. Sustainability Goal Purpose Statement Validation Measure Outcome - performance metric OR, Output - best-in-class practice and supporting model policy
  • In 2007, Portland City Council and the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners adopted resolutions directing staff to design a strategy to reduce local carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. Portland and Multnomah County’s climate action plan responds to that directive. The 2009 Climate Action Plan guides future efforts by the City and County and provides an innovative framework for the region’s transition to a more prosperous, sustainable and climate-stable future. Their action plan will also strengthen the local economy, create more jobs, improve health, and maintain the high quality of life for which this region is known. Cities are responsible for 75 percent of the global carbon emissions. With the concentration of the world’s population living in cities expected to increase from the current level of 50 percent to 60 percent by 2030, cities increasingly present the greatest opportunities to reduce global carbon emissions. Local governments have an essential role to play in: 1. Delivering policies and programs that minimize business and household emissions; 2. Working with residents and businesses to help the community prepare for the environmental, social and economic challenges that are to come; and 3. Reducing emissions from their own government operations. Portland recognized this role early on. In 1993, it became the first local government in the U.S. to adopt a strategy to address global warming. In 2001, Multnomah County joined the City of Portland in adopting a revised plan, the Local Action Plan on Global Warming, outlining 150 short- and long-term actions to reduce community-wide carbon emissions to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2010. For comparison, the target for the U.S. under the never-ratified Kyoto treaty is to reduce carbon emissions seven percent below 1990 levels by 2012. The City and County have made substantial progress in carrying out the 2010 goal of the Local Action Plan. By 2008, emissions were below 1990 levels despite rapid population and economic growth. On a per capita basis, local emissions have fallen by 19 percent since 1990.
  • In 2007, Portland City Council and the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners adopted resolutions directing staff to design a strategy to reduce local carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. Portland and Multnomah County’s climate action plan responds to that directive. The 2009 Climate Action Plan guides future efforts by the City and County and provides an innovative framework for the region’s transition to a more prosperous, sustainable and climate-stable future. Their action plan will also strengthen the local economy, create more jobs, improve health, and maintain the high quality of life for which this region is known. Cities are responsible for 75 percent of the global carbon emissions. With the concentration of the world’s population living in cities expected to increase from the current level of 50 percent to 60 percent by 2030, cities increasingly present the greatest opportunities to reduce global carbon emissions. Local governments have an essential role to play in: 1. Delivering policies and programs that minimize business and household emissions; 2. Working with residents and businesses to help the community prepare for the environmental, social and economic challenges that are to come; and 3. Reducing emissions from their own government operations. Portland recognized this role early on. In 1993, it became the first local government in the U.S. to adopt a strategy to address global warming. In 2001, Multnomah County joined the City of Portland in adopting a revised plan, the Local Action Plan on Global Warming, outlining 150 short- and long-term actions to reduce community-wide carbon emissions to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2010. For comparison, the target for the U.S. under the never-ratified Kyoto treaty is to reduce carbon emissions seven percent below 1990 levels by 2012. The City and County have made substantial progress in carrying out the 2010 goal of the Local Action Plan. By 2008, emissions were below 1990 levels despite rapid population and economic growth. On a per capita basis, local emissions have fallen by 19 percent since 1990.
  • In 2007, Portland City Council and the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners adopted resolutions directing staff to design a strategy to reduce local carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. Portland and Multnomah County’s climate action plan responds to that directive. The 2009 Climate Action Plan guides future efforts by the City and County and provides an innovative framework for the region’s transition to a more prosperous, sustainable and climate-stable future. Their action plan will also strengthen the local economy, create more jobs, improve health, and maintain the high quality of life for which this region is known. Cities are responsible for 75 percent of the global carbon emissions. With the concentration of the world’s population living in cities expected to increase from the current level of 50 percent to 60 percent by 2030, cities increasingly present the greatest opportunities to reduce global carbon emissions. Local governments have an essential role to play in: 1. Delivering policies and programs that minimize business and household emissions; 2. Working with residents and businesses to help the community prepare for the environmental, social and economic challenges that are to come; and 3. Reducing emissions from their own government operations. Portland recognized this role early on. In 1993, it became the first local government in the U.S. to adopt a strategy to address global warming. In 2001, Multnomah County joined the City of Portland in adopting a revised plan, the Local Action Plan on Global Warming, outlining 150 short- and long-term actions to reduce community-wide carbon emissions to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2010. For comparison, the target for the U.S. under the never-ratified Kyoto treaty is to reduce carbon emissions seven percent below 1990 levels by 2012. The City and County have made substantial progress in carrying out the 2010 goal of the Local Action Plan. By 2008, emissions were below 1990 levels despite rapid population and economic growth. On a per capita basis, local emissions have fallen by 19 percent since 1990.
  • STAR measures will be developed through a phased approach, with four modules consisting of 20 of STAR sustainability goal areas and corresponding measures. Modules 1 and 2 will be completed in 2011 and published to allow local governments to begin integrating their sustainability initiatives and priorities with the STAR Rating System. Modules 3 and 4 will be completed by mid-year 2012. Program completion and Pilot Program launch targeted for Q2 2012
  • ICLEI USA has unparalleled experience engaging and guiding our members on taking significant action to quantify and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions while decreasing operational costs, improving economic stability, and enhancing overall community livability. The foundation of our experience is helping members progress through a proven Five Milestone process, a systematic and performance based approach where each step builds on the last – from conducting an assessment to establish a baseline to evaulating and reporting performance achievements.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Measuring sustainability performance across the 3 E’s STAR Community Index™
    • 2. 600 cities, towns & counties 25% growth in 2009 ICLEI-USA is a membership association of local governments.
    • 3.
      • A framework for sustainability encompassing the environment, economy, and social equity;
      • An online performance management system that gathers, organizes, analyzes, and presents information required to meet community and local government sustainability goals; and
      • A rating system that drives continuous improvement and fosters competition in advancing community health, prosperity and inclusion.
      What is the STAR Community Index? Built by and for local governments More than 160 volunteers representing 50 cities and counties, state and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, national associations, universities, utilities, and private corporations have contributed thousands of hours and diverse expertise to the development of STAR.
    • 4. Be a STAR Community. Be prosperous . Be efficient. Be inclusive. Be healthy. Be livable. Be resilient. Be innovative.
    • 5. Sustainability Progress in 5 Steps. 1 2 3 4 5 Register your community at STAR Online. Choose sustainability goals from a menu of options. Measure & report performance using a customized dashboard. Submit performance for validation. Obtain STAR Community certification.
    • 6. STAR is needed for many reasons.
      • STAR provides a national standard for measuring sustainability performance.
      • STAR advances data collection, reporting and accountability.
      • STAR offers communities the tools they need to succeed.
      • STAR advances economic and equity goals, often overlooked in green initiatives.
      • STAR fosters collaboration and innovation.
      “ There is no common way of defining and measuring sustainability. We need a system to quantify how we’re doing and to guide us to further leadership, and that system should be designed by the cities who will use it.” - Sadhu Johnston, Deputy City Manager, Vancouver, BC, and Chair, STAR Steering Committee
    • 7.
      • Strategic sustainability planning & performance management tool:
        • Project management and document sharing
        • Data gathering and performance reporting
        • Customer management system
        • Online commons
        • Dashboard integrated with applicant website
      STAR is more than a rating system.
    • 8.
        • Atlanta, GA
        • Austin, TX
        • Boulder, CO
        • Chattanooga, TN
        • Cranberry Township, PA
        • Des Moines, IA
        • King County, WA
        • New York, NY
        • St. Louis, MO
        • Washington, DC
      STAR has existing market demand.
    • 9. Economic Prosperity Natural Systems Planning & Design Energy & Climate Employment & Workforce Training Affordability & Social Equity Health & Safety Education, Arts & Community Steering Committee Executive Committee 9 Technical Advisory Committees Environment Economy Society STAR Stakeholders Data Committee Beta Communities
    • 10. STAR Guiding Principles Think and act systemically. Instill resiliency. Foster innovation. Redefine progress. Live within means. Cultivate collaboration. Ensure equity. Embrace diversity. Inspire leadership. Continuously improve.
    • 11. Framework, STAR Rating System Terms Definition Goals Comprehensive community-level aspirations toward achieving sustainability. Objective A clear, desired outcome intended to move the community toward the goal. Performance Measures Community level outcomes representing the actual state of a system and used to identify progress relative to Objective. Local government actions that are preparatory steps or implementation in nature; proven effective and essential toward achieving Objective.
    • 12. Example, STAR Goals and Objectives NATURAL SYSTEMS PLANNING & DESIGN ENERGY & CLIMATE Nature Comprehensive Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Waste Minimization Mobility & Transportation Climate Adaptation Compact & Complete Communities Resource Efficient Buildings Housing ECONOMIC PROSPERITY EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING EDUCATION, ART & COMMUNITY Industry Sector Development & Revitalization Workforce Development Educational Opportunities Food System Arts and Culture Economic Localization HEALTH & SAFETY AFFORDABILITY & EQUITY INNOVATION & PROCESS Food Access & Nutrition Equity Assessment & Plan Natural & Human Hazards Infrastructure Investments
    • 13.
        • What are local government needs around measuring sustainability performance?
        • What are your local priorities? Is sustainability a priority?
        • For non-local governments, how do you work with and support local governments?
        • Are local efforts or your organizations efforts focused on sustainability initiatives at the operations level (building, fleet, procurement, etc.) or community scale?
      Questions for the audience.
    • 14.
      • GOAL AREA: Energy & Climate
      • OBJECTIVE: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation
      • PERFORMANCE MEASURES :
        • A. Community-level outcomes
        • Show progress relative to the common long term GHG reduction target of 80% below baseline year GHG emission levels by 2050 (80x50).
        • B. Local government actions
        • Conduct a GHG emissions inventory; adopt reduction target; develop Climate Action Plan; implement the Plan
      Performance Measure Example
    • 15.
      • GOAL AREA: Health & Safety
      • OBJECTIVE: Food Access & Nutrition
      • PERFORMANCE MEASURES :
        • A. Community-level outcomes
        • Achievement of 1 measure in 5 of 9 categories: Local Food Production, Food Procurement, Food and Nutrition Literacy, Food Assistance, Access to Food, Prevalence and Availability of Healthy Food, Limiting Unhealthy Food, Household Food Security, Nutrition and Health of Residents
        • B. Local government actions
        • Establish a Food Policy Council (FPC); conduct an assessment of existing food policies & programs; set targets and objectives; engage the community in the process.
      Performance Measure Example
    • 16.
      • GOAL AREA: Natural Systems
      • OBJECTIVE: Waste Minimization
      • PERFORMANCE MEASURES :
        • A. Community-level outcomes
        • Meet or exceed an incremental straight-line annual reduction, relative to a common long-term target of a 100% reduction in total solid waste generated within the jurisdiction that is disposed of via landfill or incinerator by 2050 (100x50) from a baseline year.
        • B. Local government actions
        • In progress.
      Performance Measure Example
    • 17. Beta Tool & Pilot Program 2010 2011 2012 Content Development Product Development Pilot Program Release Module 1 Complete measures Launch STAR Pilot Release Goals & Guiding Principles
    • 18. 2012 STAR Community Action Plan. 1. Leverage funding to complete development. 2. Test our business model and assumptions. 3. Complete the STAR Community Rating System (content). 4. Creatively engage the 10 STAR Beta Communities. 5. Develop the STAR Community online platform. 6. Prepare a communications and marketing strategy. 7. Build a STAR Community education and training curricula. 8. Engage the federal government, private sector, and new partners. 9. Start planning for a future Annual Sustainable Communities Conference. 10. Launch the STAR Pilot Program in 2012.
    • 19.
      • Hilari Varnadore, Director
      • STAR Community Index
      • 202.697.0887
      • [email_address]
      • www.icleiusa.org
      Contact: One hundred fifty Amazingly bright people It takes a village. Haiku by Thor Peterson, Technical Director