Simcha Jong presentation

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After the life sciences strategy; Managing science-based R&D collaborations.

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Simcha Jong presentation

  1. 1. After the life sciences strategy;Managing science-based R&D collaborationsInnovation Research Initiative project „New modes of innovation‟ Simcha Jong Department of Management Science and Innovation University College London NESTA, 27 January 2012
  2. 2. Outline Highlighting the benefits of academic engagement in therapeutic R&D The UK Life Sciences Strategy as a business opportunity Capitalizing on academic collaborations
  3. 3. Outline Highlighting the benefits of academic engagement in therapeutic R&D The UK Life Sciences Strategy as a business opportunity Capitalizing on academic collaborations
  4. 4. Changes in the life sciences R&D landscape Prolonged VC funding drought in biotechnology; – First-time VC funding at 16-year low. New initiatives to strengthen UK translational capabilities. Academic tech transfer offices as more sophisticated participants in IP markets. Changing attitudes, more experienced PIs. Increasing reliance on direct relationships with academia to maintain innovative performance over time
  5. 5. Our project 1. Analysis of academic engagement of 190 UK-based therapeutic biotechnology firms over period 1998-2009. Data on 1279 publications, 922 new compounds, 702 alliances, and 2390 patents. 2. In-depth qualitative case studies of Alnylam, Geron, TiGenix, Advanced BioHealing, Cytograft, iPierian.
  6. 6. Our project 1. Analysis of academic engagement of 190 UK-based therapeutic biotechnology firms over period 1998-2009. Data on 1279 publications, 922 new compounds, 702 alliances, and 2390 patents. 2. In-depth qualitative case studies of Alnylam, Geron, TiGenix, Advanced BioHealing, Cytograft, iPierian.
  7. 7. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers •Access to academic knowhow at the scientific frontier •Strong IP estate Product firms •External help in R&D •Access to cheap capital
  8. 8. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers •Access to academic knowhow at the Life sciences firms that are active scientific frontier in engaging the academic community through publications •Strong IP estate are able to attract Biology PhD’s at Product firms a 25% discount (Stern 2004) •External help in R&D •Access to cheap capital
  9. 9. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers Participation in the academic •Access to academic knowhow at the community increases willingness to reciprocate by academic scientific frontier researchers. Our data show an •Strong IP estate increased willingness of universities to collaborate towards Product firms firms that publish in scientific •External help in R&D journals. •Access to cheap capital
  10. 10. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers •Access to academic knowhow at the Engagement with the academic scientific frontier community is critical to dominance in a specific IP field and effective •Strong IP estate barriers to entry. Recent examples Product firms include Millennium, Alnylam. •External help in R&D •Access to cheap capital
  11. 11. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers •Access to academic knowhow at the Academic collaborations offer opportunities to mobilize cheap scientific frontier external hands in R&D, especially •Strong IP estate for firms engaging in the development of more disruptive Product firms technologies •External help in R&D •Access to cheap capital
  12. 12. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Benefits Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers •Access to academic knowhow at the scientific frontier Grant funding is an expanding •Strong IP estate source of funding for biotech firms Product firms •External help in R&D •Access to cheap “capital”
  13. 13. Benefiting from academic engagement Driving innovative capabilities Platform firms •Recruitment of top researchers The real returns on scientific •Access to academic knowhow at the activities measured in enhanced R&D productivity; scientific frontier A publication increases •Strong IP estate productivity by 5% Product firms For NCE’s this increase is 9% •External help in R&D •Access to cheap capital
  14. 14. Outline Highlighting the benefits of academic engagement in therapeutic R&D The UK Life Sciences Strategy as a business opportunity Capitalizing on academic collaborations
  15. 15. UK Life Sciences Strategy as creating newopportunities for industry Life sciences as central to growth agenda.Major infrastructure commitments in biomedical research, i.e. £700m Francis Crick institute. Investments in growth sectors, e.g. £130m in stratified medicine and £50m in cell therapy. Which are the challenges in capitalizing on academic collaborations?
  16. 16. Outline Highlighting the benefits of academic engagement in therapeutic R&D The UK Life Sciences Strategy as a business opportunity Capitalizing on academic collaborations
  17. 17. Towards new modes of innovation in the lifesciencesIP transfer model Partnership modelAcademic collaborations as a means to Academic collaborations as a means totransfer individual pieces of IP enhance the firm‟s innovative capabilitiesAcademic collaborations as one-off Academic collaborations as more long-deals term relationshipsThe TLO/PI as the partner Industry as tied into broader scholarly networks in academic institutionsLittle involvement of industry in Industry funding as a catalyst for newacademic programs (interdisciplinary) research programs in academic institutions
  18. 18. From IP transfer to collaborative partnerships “Academic Superstars”
  19. 19. From IP transfer to collaborative partnerships
  20. 20. From IP transfer to collaborative partnerships Leveraging academic collaborations to advance the firm‟s R&D programs can be challenging however….
  21. 21. The challenge “you know it [academic collaborations] means funding their research. Lots of money out the door.”…. “So I think I had a pretty good sense of what needed to be done and who were good collaborators … so … with the [deleted] work you know I was collaborating with [Professor A] and [Professor B] who won the Nobel Prize this year. In retrospect, people look at that and say, “Wow, that was a good choice of collaborators; they ended up winning the Nobel Prize!” They didn‟t help us [laughter]. They didn‟t help us though [laughter]… But they ended up winning the Nobel Prize!”…“In the early days of [Company A] we had really good financing, lot of money, and had all kinds of people coming to me and a normal kind of a business guy would come and say, “Wow, they are MIT, they‟re Harvard, fund them!” You would have been buffaloed by big thing scientists, big name institutions and thrown all your money away and gotten nothing.” …. “Generally, I don‟t like collaborations.” Source: May 2010 interview with the CEO of US-based biotechnology firm
  22. 22. Some questions for panels• How are successful academic collaborations structured?• Which are the day-to-day challenges in making academic collaborations successful?• When is it better to rely on academic collaborations? And when is it better to rely on internal R&D capabilities?• What opportunities are there for smaller firms to benefit from the UK science base beyond ties to founders‟ laboratories?• What can be done by policy makers to improve support for academic collaborations in the UK?

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