NEHA AEC 2008 Small Wares: How to Tell A Story
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A Learning Laboratory Workshop for the National Environmental Health Association 2008 Annual Education Conference in Tucson AZ

A Learning Laboratory Workshop for the National Environmental Health Association 2008 Annual Education Conference in Tucson AZ

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NEHA AEC 2008 Small Wares: How to Tell A Story Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Small Wares: How to tell a memorable story Steven Lipton M.Ed. LEHP CP-FS President Biotest Services Inc.
  • 2. Two Rabbis walk into a bar…
  • 3. Story and Law [B. Sotah 40a]
    • R. Abbahu and R. Hiyya b. Abba once came to a place; R. Abbahu expounded Aggadah and R. Hiyya b. Abba expounded legal lore. All the people left R. Hiyya b. Abba and went to hear R. Abbahu, so that the former was upset. [R. Abbahu] said to him: ‘I will give you a parable. To what is the matter like? To two men, one of whom was selling precious stones and the other various kinds of small ware. To whom will the people hurry? Is it not to the seller of various kinds of small ware?’
  • 4. Let’s Avoid this….
  • 5. The 7 C’s of Story Telling
    • Making the Story Simple
    • Core
    • Compact
    • Making the message understandable
    • Concrete
    • Creditable
    • Getting People to Listen
    • Curious
    • Connect
    • Contrast
  • 6. Non- Verbal Connection
  • 7. Projection exercise - Name
    • Introduce your self
      • Name
      • Where you work
    • If someone can’t hear you they will raise their hand.
    • Keep saying your name until all hands are down
    • Next person goes.
  • 8. Who would you want to talk to more?
  • 9. Liking – non verbal messages
    • Smile
      • Show some teeth!
      • “Receive everyone with a shining beautiful face”
  • 10. Execrcise 1a – Non verbal Connecting
    • Select a partner
    • Person A turn heart away from person B heart
    • Say the following loudly:
    • Point to the person’s heart and Say “you did it”
    • Switch roles
    • Repeat but speak softly
  • 11. Combat
  • 12. Execrcise 1b – Non verbal Connecting
    • Person A turn heart towards person B heart
    • Say the following while projecting:
    • With an open hand wave your palm towards the heart and Say “you did this”
    • Switch roles
    • Now repeat and say softly
  • 13. Non verbal messages
    • Open posture
      • Open arms
      • Heart facing
  • 14. Connecting – non verbal messages
    • Eye Contact
  • 15. Exercise: Eye Contact
    • Person A turn Eyes either down or up and to the left, away from person B.
    • Say the following things:
      • I trust you
      • - Do I Have a story to tell you
    • Switch roles
    • Now look them in the eye, and repeat.
  • 16. The 7 C’s of Story Telling
    • Making the Story Simple
    • Core
    • Compact
    • Making the message understandable
    • Concrete
    • Creditable
    • Getting People to Listen
    • Curious
    • Connect
    • Contrast
  • 17. Simple- What is this?
    • Two Black irregular quadrilaterals and three black irregular hexagons with two interior facing sides with at least two right angles on each shape on a white background.
    • A white triangle on top of a black line and three black squares with a white background
    • A white Triangle
  • 18. Core
    • What is the key idea I need to convey?
  • 19. Core : White vs. Milk chocolate 21 CFR 163.124-130
    • § 163.124   White chocolate. (a) Description. (1) White chocolate is the solid or semiplastic food prepared by intimately mixing and grinding cacao fat with one or more of the optional dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section and one or more optional nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners and may contain one or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section. White chocolate shall be free of coloring material. ) White chocolate contains not less than 20 percent by weight of cacao fat as calculated by subtracting from the weight of the total fat the weight of the milkfat, dividing the result by the weight of the finished white chocolate, and multiplying the quotient by 100. The finished white chocolate contains not less than 3.5 percent by weight of milkfat and not less than 14 percent by weight of total milk solids, calculated by using only those dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and not more than 55 percent by weight nutritive carbohydrate sweetener. (b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used: (1) Nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners; (2) Dairy ingredients: (i) Cream, milkfat, butter; (ii) Milk, dry whole milk, concentrated milk, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk; (iii) Skim milk, concentrated skim milk, evaporated skim milk, sweetened condensed skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (iv) Concentrated buttermilk, dried buttermilk; and (v) Malted milk; (3) Emulsifying agents, used singly or in combination, the total amount of which does not exceed 1.5 percent by weight; (4) Spices, natural and artificial flavorings, ground whole nut meats, ground coffee, dried malted cereal extract, salt, and other seasonings that do not either singly or in combination impart a flavor that imitates the flavor of chocolate, milk, or butter; (5) Antioxidants; and (6) Whey or whey products, the total amount of which does not exceed 5 percent by weight. (c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “white chocolate” or “white chocolate coating.” When one or more of the spices, flavorings, or seasonings specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section are used, the label shall bear an appropriate statement, e.g., “Spice added”, “Flavored with ___ ”, or “With ___ added”, the blank being filled in with the common or usual name of the spice, flavoring, or seasoning used, in accordance with §101.22 of this chapter. (d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.
    • [67 FR 62177, Oct. 4, 2002]
    • § 163.130   Milk chocolate .(a) Description. (1) Milk chocolate is the solid or semiplastic food prepared by intimately mixing and grinding chocolate liquor with one or more of the optional dairy ingredients and one or more optional nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners, and may contain one or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section . (2) Milk chocolate contains not less than 10 percent by weight of chocolate liquor complying with the requirements of §163.111 as calculated by subtracting from the weight of the chocolate liquor used the weight of cacao fat therein and the weights of alkali, neutralizing and seasoning ingredients, multiplying the remainder by 2.2, dividing the result by the weight of the finished milk chocolate, and multiplying the quotient by 100. The finished milk chocolate contains not less than 3.39 percent by weight of milkfat and not less than 12 percent by weight of total milk solids based on those dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, exclusive of any added sweetener or other dairy-derived ingredient that is added beyond that amount that is normally present in the specified dairy ingredient. (b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used: (1) Cacao fat; (2) Nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners; (3) Spices, natural and artificial flavorings, ground whole nut meats, ground coffee, dried malted cereal extract, salt, and other seasonings that do not either singly or in combination impart a flavor that imitates the flavor of chocolate, milk, or butter; (4) Dairy ingredients: (i) Cream, milkfat, butter; (ii) Milk, concentrated milk, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, dried milk; and (iii) Skim milk, concentrated skim milk, evaporated skim milk, sweetened condensed skim milk, nonfat dry milk; or (5) Emulsifying agents, used singly or in combination, he total amount of which does not exceed 1.0 percent by weight.(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “milk chocolate” or “milk chocolate coating”.(1) When optional alkali ingredients are used in the preparation of the chocolate liquor or the cacao nibs from which the milk chocolate was prepared, the label shall bear the statement “Processed with alkali”, or “Processed with ___”, the blank being filled in with the common or usual name of the specific alkali ingredient used in the food. (2) When optional neutralizing agents are used in the preparation of the chocolate liquor or the cacao nibs from which the milk chocolate was prepared, the label shall bear the statement “Processed with neutralizing agents”, or “Processed with ___”, the blank being filled in with the common or usual name of the specific neutralizing agent used in the food. (3) When one or more of the spices, flavorings, or seasonings specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section are used in the breakfast cocoa, the label shall bear an appropriate statement, e.g., “Spice added”, “Flavored with ___”, or “With ___ added”, the blank being filled in with the common or usual name of the spice, flavoring, or seasoning used, in accordance with §101.22 of this chapter. (4) When two or more of the statements set forth in this paragraph are required, such statements may be combined in a manner that is appropriate, but not misleading. (5) Whenever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the statements prescribed in this paragraph showing optional ingredients used shall precede or follow such name without intervening printed or graphic matter. (d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.
  • 20. Core
    • White chocolate is Cocoa Fat & Dairy product
    • Milk chocolate also has at least 10% Chocolate Liquor
  • 21. Compact
    • Keep it small
    • Use already known ideas
    • The High Concept -
      • “The Starbuck’s of Popcorn”
      • “The Low-Fare Airline”
      • “Get Smart for Kids”
      • “The Candidate of Change”
  • 22. Compact & Core – example
    • In less than ten words, what was the core idea/ High concept of one presentation you have gone to?
  • 23. Compact & Core - Parables
    • ‘To what is the matter like? To two men, one of whom was selling precious stones and the other various kinds of small ware. To whom will the people hurry? Is it not to the seller of various kinds of small ware?’
  • 24. Compact - Parables Complex subject Simple Situation Compared to
  • 25. Compact – Parables – When should I learn?
    • He who learns [when] a child, what is he [to be] compared to? To ink written upon a new writing sheet.
    • He who learns [when] an old man, what is he like? To ink written on a writing sheet one has erased. [Avot III]
  • 26. Parables
    • Think up a parable or analogy for one of the following:
    • What is Environmental Health?
    • How is your budget decided on?
    • Why is there so much foodborne illness in the news?
    • What do you do for a living?
  • 27. The 7 C’s of story telling
    • Making the Story Simple
    • Core
    • Compact
    • Making the message understandable
    • Concrete
    • Creditable
    • Getting People to Listen
    • Curious
    • Connect
    • Contrast
  • 28. Concrete
    • Details + Emotions = Pictures
  • 29. Anchors
  • 30. Emotional Color and Warmth
  • 31. Details
    • What details are here?
    • What don’t I need to say?
  • 32. Creditable
  • 33. Creditable
    • Cite your sources -- written
    • Be compact!
  • 34. Creditable
    • Cite your sources – oral
    • Why is this person creditable?
    • You are creditable!
  • 35. Creditable
    • Have the listener make the decision
    To what is the matter like? To two men, one of whom was selling precious stones and the other various kinds of small ware. To whom will the people hurry? Is it not to the seller of various kinds of small ware?’
  • 36. Creditable & Concrete
    • Use situations and anchors familiar to the listener.
    • Stand up comedians
    • Why is this funny?
    • What is the core idea?
    Bill Cosby - “the water bottle” Jerry Seinfeld- “fear #1”
  • 37. The 7 C’s of story telling
    • Making the Story Simple
    • Core
    • Compact
    • Making the message understandable
    • Concrete
    • Creditable
    • Getting People to Listen
    • Curious
    • Connect
    • Contrast
  • 38. Curious - Suprise
    • An unexpected statement, action, or situation
    • Surprise requires resolution
  • 39. Suprise
    • “It hung in the air very much like a brick doesn’t” – Douglas Adams
    • “Environmental Health is the orphan of Public Health” – Rob Blake
    • “Have you ever seen dead chickens flying down the stairs?” – Steve Lipton
    • What do these statements do?
  • 40. Curious
    • Mystery
    • Start with surprise to create mystery
    • Mystery resolves the Surprise
    • Forces looking closer
  • 41. Curious
    • Go around the table and make a surprise statement about someone you've met in the field.
  • 42. The 7 C’s of story telling
    • Making the Story Simple
    • Core
    • Compact
    • Making the message understandable
    • Concrete
    • Creditable
    • Getting People to Listen
    • Curious
    • Connect
    • Contrast
  • 43. Contrasts
    • Sets up evaluation for creditability
    • Interactive
    • Make things colorful
  • 44. Putting a Story Together
    • Know your core statement
    • Start with surprise
    • Add concrete details
    • Add emotion
    • Resolve the mystery
  • 45. An Example Story
    • Have you seen dead chickens flying?
    • What is the core message?
    • How do I make mystery (how many times?)
    • What details did a keep in the story?
  • 46. What’s the Story?
  • 47. What’s the story?
  • 48. Story Circle (1 minute max)
    • Form a circle
    • Each person Pick one of these:
      • Tell a “stupid criminal” story. What was the most lame-brained violation you ever saw or heard of.
      • Tell a story about a time you had a strange regulatory experience.
    • When you get the mike/story stick, stand up and tell your story to the whole group
    • Listeners tell the storyteller the core message.
  • 49. Tell a story (longer)
    • Get back into groups of 2-3 people
    • Tell a story whose core component is compliance with a law.
    • Add details!
    • It may be a longer version of the last exercise, or something new.
    • Decide who has the best story among the group.
  • 50. Your opportunity for the Spotlight
    • 8:00 Lessons from the field –Presidio IV
    • Volunteers?
      • 1-3 minute stories
      • 10 minute stories
    • Team stories
  • 51. Questions?
    • For further reading:
      • Cialdini, Robert B. Persuation: The Psychology of Influence (New York: Collins Publishers, 1998)
      • Cialdini, Robert B. “What’s The Best Secret Device for Engaging Student Interest? The Answer Is In the Title” Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology , Vol. 24, No. 1, 2005, pp. 22-29
      • Heath, Chip and Dan Heath Made to Stick: Why some Ideas Survive and Others Die. (New York: Random House 2007)