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Reading Your Texts Efficiently: Increase Comprehension & Save Time

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Reading Your Texts Efficiently: Increase Comprehension & Save Time …

Reading Your Texts Efficiently: Increase Comprehension & Save Time

Do you read slowly? Do you have trouble focusing when reading? Is it hard to remember what you read?

This workshop will introduce you to strategies to use before, during and after reading to help you learn how to best focus and how to select important information from a text. It will also show you ways to improve your abilities to retain and analyze what you have read.

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  • 1. READING EFFICIENCY: GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU READ
  • 2. Writing
    Critical
    Thinking
    Academic
    Research
    Stress
    Management
    Time
    Management
    Reading
    Efficiency
    Navigating
    ESC Resources
    Developing a
    Study Plan
    Learning
    Styles
    Goal
    Setting
    Rationale
    Essay
    The Pieces of Academic Success
  • 3. Academic Support @ NEC
    Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success
    Services & Resources
    Learning Coaches & Content Tutors
    • One-to-one appointments in person or via phone, e-mail, Internet, etc.
    • 4. Workshops (online & onsite)
    • 5. Small group assistance (online & onsite)
    • 6. Online Content Area Tutoring – Smarthinking (www.esc.edu/smarthinking)
    Online Support
    • For Academic Support Information & Materials Available 24/7 Online go to http://NECacademicsupport.pbworks.com
    • 7. A self-paced or credit-bearing study & resources - http://AcademicEye.pbworks.com
    • 8. On Facebook - NEC Academic Support & Student Services
  • Meet the Learning Coaches
    What is a learning coach?
    A learning coach is someone who provides academic support to students in one-on-one or small group settings in all areas of the writing process and related study skills strategies including time management, organization, reading efficiency, developing a study plan, goal setting, critical thinking, library research skills, note-taking, and learning styles.
    Sarah Spence-Staultersis located in Latham working with Schenectady & Latham/Albany students
    Her hours are: Mondays – 3pm- 7:30pm
    Wednesdays –3:00pm-7:30pm
    Fridays - 9am- 4pm
    Contact Sarah to make an appointment :
    (518) 783-6203 ext 5992 or Sarah.Spence-Staulters@esc.edu
    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Kate Stockton is located in Latham working with Johnstown & Latham/Albany students
    Her hours are: Mondays - 4:00pm-7:30pm
    Wednesday - 4:00pm-7:30pm
    Thursdays - 4:00pm-8:00pm
    Contact Kate to make an appointment :
    (518) 783-6203 ext 5992 or Kate.Stockton@esc.edu
    ____________________________________________________________________
    Mary Sanders-Shartleis located in Saratoga working with Saratoga & Queensbury students
    Her hours are: Mondays – 12pm-2pm
    Wednesdays – 3pm-6pm
    Thursdays 4pm-6pm
    Contact Mary to make an appointment :
    (518) 587-2100 ext 2827 or Mary.Sanders-Shartle@esc.edu
  • 9. Academic Support @ NEC
    Peers
    Engagingas
    Energizing
    Resources
    Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success
    Apeer coach is a current undergraduate or graduate student trained to guide and encourage other students in improving their academic performance and development as a life-long learner, focusing on general study skills, specific content-areas, navigating college resources, and developing within their Areas of Study.
    They work in both face-to-face and virtual environments.
    Peer coaches are trained under College Reading & Learning Association (CRLA) international standards for peer tutors and are either volunteers, work-study, or practicum students.
    Center-based &
    0nline
    Academic
    Collaborative
    Helpers
    Enhancing
    Success
  • 10. Workshop Description
    Do you read slowly? Do you have trouble remembering what you have read? Being able to read more efficiently and effectively will help you be more successful with your studies at Empire State College.  This workshop is designed to give you strategies for getting the best value from your reading and is designed to introduce you to a variety of reading strategies to use before, during and after reading to engage your thought processes and improve your abilities to retain and analyze what you have read. The skills and strategies in this workshop will assist you in learning how to best focus when you read and how to select important information from a text in order to recall it for class discussions and assignments.
  • 11. Accessing Academic Support Resources
    ANGEL Community Group
    NEC Academic Support
    http://www.esc.edu/ole
    Individualized Support
    • One-to-one appointments in person or via phone, e-mail, Internet, etc.
    • 12. Workshops (online & onsite)
    • 13. Small group assistance (online & onsite)
    • 14. Online Tutoring – Smarthinking (www.esc.edu/smarthinking) or (www.smarthinking.com)
  • Agenda
    Reading & Decoding
    Textbook Reading & Comprehension
    SQ3R/SQ5R
    Skimming & Scanning
    Reading & Notetaking
    Says/Does
    Mindmapping
    Critical Reading
    PTR2
  • 15.
  • 16. Reading & Decoding
    College reading entails having not only to read and comprehend a subject, but it also entails reading for a specific purpose, being able to analyze the material you read, and to read between the lines.
    Let’s look at 3 levels of reading and decoding:
    Decoding for meaning – using context clues
    Reading for meaning – not word for word
    Reading with a purpose – knowing what you are reading about and why you are reading it
  • 17. Decoding for Meaning – Using context clues
    Belly Button
    Raining Cats and Dogs
  • 18. Reading for Meaning – not word for word
    Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
    According to a researcher at Cambridge University, it doesn't matter in what order the letters in a word are, the only important thing is that the first and last letter be at the right place. The rest can be a total mess and you can still read it without problem. This is because the human mind does not read every letter by itself but the word as a whole.
    http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/~mattd/Cmabrigde/
  • 19. Reading with a Purpose
    What is this about?
    A newspaper is better than a magazine. A seashore is a better place than the street. At first it is better to run than to walk. You may have to try several times. It takes some skill but it’s easy to learn. Even young children can enjoy it. Once you are successful, complications are minimal. Birds seldom get too close. Rain, however, soaks in very fast. Too many people doing the same thing can also cause problems. One needs lots of room. If there are no complications, it can be very peaceful. A rock will serve as an anchor. If things break loose from it, however, you will not get a second chance.
  • 20. Comprehension
  • 21. Think about how to best take notes
  • 22. friends/family)
  • 23.
  • 24. Identifying Your Purpose For Reading Using Bloom’s Taxonomy
    Appraise, assess, or
    critique on a basis of
    Specific standards &
    criteria.
    EVALUATION
    Accomplish a personal task
    after devising plan of action.
    SYNTHESIS
    Identify the elements (assumptions,
    hypotheses, evidence) and structure
    of a situation.
    ANALYSIS
    Remember knowledge or principles in
    order to solve a problem and apply rules.
    APPLICATION
    Demonstrate understanding, interpret, &
    extrapolate from a certain body of knowledge,
    facts and ideas.
    COMPREHENSION
    Recall words, facts, dates, convention, classification,
    principles, theories, etc. in the approximate form in
    which they were learned.
    KNOWLEDGE
  • 25. What is the following about???
    This is an easy thing to do. If possible, you will do it at home, but you can always go somewhere else if it is necessary.
    Beware of doing too much at once. This is a major mistake and may cost you quite a bit of money. It is far better to do too little than attempt to do too much. Make sure everything is grouped properly. Put everything into its appropriate place.
    Now you are ready to proceed. The next step is to put things into another convenient arrangement. Once done, you’ll probably have to start again really soon. Most likely, you’ll be doing this for the rest of your life---- perhaps not. Who knows?
  • 26. Doing Laundry
    This is an easy thing to do. If possible, you will do it at home, but you can always go somewhere else if it is necessary.
    Beware of doing too much at once. This is a major mistake and may cost you quite a bit of money. It is far better to do too little than attempt to do too much. Make sure everything is grouped properly. Put everything into its appropriate place.
    Now you are ready to proceed. The next step is to put things into another convenient arrangement. Once done, you’ll probably have to start again really soon. Most likely, you’ll be doing this for the rest of your life---- perhaps not. Who knows?
  • 27. Schema
    A schema in general is a specific, well-documented, and consistent plan. The related word, scheme means a loosely described plan.
    A schema (pl. schemata), in psychology and cognitive science, is a mental structure (prior knowledge) that represents some aspect of the world. People use schemata to organize current knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding.
  • 28. Reading Efficiency & Comprehension Strategies
    SQ3R
    Says/Does
    PTR2
    Mindmapping
  • 29. Textbook Study System
    SQ3R
    5 step method that was designed to help people become more active in their reading and retain information more easily.
    Survey- Read intro, summary; skim headings, boldface, pictures, charts, graphs, etc.
    Question- set purpose for reading
    Read- break into sections
    Recite-key information in your own words
    Review -scan material; talk about it with classmate if possible; identify themes and relationships between concepts
    SQ3R system was developed during WWII to help military personnel enrolled in special programs ready faster and study better.
    Research shows students who learn system and use it conscientiously
    - read 22% faster
    - comprehend 10% more
    - retain 80% of material.
  • 30.
  • 31. Survey
    Objective: To get a solid overview of what you are going to be reading.
    What it does…
    Prepares your mental processing system.
    Why do it ?
    • Better able to concentrate with a frame of reference.
    • 32. Be able to identify location of important information.
    Endstate…
    Better understanding/comprehension/retention of material
  • 33. Survey Applied to Your Studies
    Begin by looking at the learning contract and assignments
    Take note of assigned terms and problems
    Skim any handouts
    Read the introduction
    Skim (rapidly) through the chapter, notice main headings and visuals
    Read the summary/intro overview of the chapter
  • 34.
  • 35.
  • 36. Restatement:
    Reading What a Text Says
    Description:
    Describing What a Text Does
    Interpretation:
    Analyzing What a Text Means
  • 37. EXAMPLES of Ways to Read and Discuss TextFrom: www.criticalreading.com/ways_to_read.htm
    Consider the following nursery rhyme...
    Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow, and everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go.
    What A Text Saystalks about the topic of the original text, Mary and the lamb.
    Mary had a lamb that followed her everywhere.
    What A Text Doestalks about the story.
    The nursery rhyme describes a pet that followed its mistress everywhere.
    What a Text Meanstalks about meaning within the story, here the idea of innocent devotion.
    An image of innocent devotion is conveyed by the story of a lamb's close connection to its mistress. The devotion is emphasized by repetition that emphasizes the constancy of the lamb's actions ("everywhere"…"sure to go.") The notion of innocence is conveyed by the image of a young lamb, "white as snow." By making it seem that this connection between pet and mistress is natural and good, the nursery rhyme asserts innocent devotion as a positive relationship.
  • 38. SAYS/DOES EXAMPLE
    SAYS
    DOES
    Congress attempts to influence social problems with change in time
    Intro to topic with humorous linkages to daily impact of change in DLS.
    Change in DLS is extended 4 weeks and points out problems with original intent & current change
    Provides current state of affairs with & critique of the change in DLS.
    Copyright New York Times Company Aug 9, 2005
    CONGRESS has an amazing new scheme to cut crime, automobile fatalities and energy consumption. There is one hitch. We have to stay in bed until sunrise during the first week of November -- lights out, televisions and radios off and please stay away from that coffee maker.
    Of course, doing so might interfere with breakfast, school attendance, morning workouts and jobs. That's because during that week, the sun won't rise until 7:30 a.m. at the earliest. If you live on the western edge of your time zone, expect darkness until 8:30 a.m. Sorry, Boise. Good night, Grand Rapids.
    Congress has extended daylight saving time by four weeks: In 2007, our clocks will spring forward on the second Sunday of March and fall back on the first Sunday of November. And frankly, there may be another hitch or two in the plan. First, the trick of shifting unused morning light to evening was intended to exploit long summer days, when sunrise occurs between 4:00 and 5:00 a.m. Standard Time -- hours of daylight that do not exist during the short days of March and November. Second, after nearly 100 years, daylight saving has yet to save us anything. The idea of falsifying clocks was proposed by the British architect William Willett in 1907, but the Germans were the first to try it in 1916, hoping that it would help them conserve fuel during the First World War. Then Britain and America gave their clocks a whirl. The fuel savings never materialized, and daylight saving was so unpopular here that Congress repealed it before officially declaring an end to the war. That most Americans still believe we save daylight to help farmers tells you something about the quality of debate on this perennial controversy. In fact, farmers hated daylight saving. They needed morning light to get their dairy and crops to markets, and they were powerful enough to rally popular opinion against the law. For that reason, except during the Second World War, Congress did not dare to pass a national daylight saving policy for almost 50 years. It was New York City that kept the practice alive, and it did so by passing a local daylight ordinance in 1919. This served the powerful department stores, which wanted evening light to tempt working people to shop on their way home. Wall Street profited, too; fast time preserved one hour of overlap with London traders, whose clocks sprung forward every year. By 1965, 71 of the largest American cities practiced daylight saving and 59 did not. One airline reported 4,000 calls a day from customers asking what time it would be in their destination cities. The United States Naval Observatory dubbed the nation ''the world's worst timekeeper.'' And so in 1966, Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which gave us six months of Standard Time and six months of daylight saving. This wise compromise has since been compromised out of existence. We now face eight months of daylight saving. Before we bargain our way into a permanent, year-round policy, we should know whom we have to thank for saving us nothing. Richard Nixon infamously mandated year-round daylight saving in 1974 and 1975. This decision did not soften the blow of the OPEC oil embargo, but it did put school children on pitch-black streets every morning until the plan was scaled back. A Department of Transportation study concluded that Nixon's experiment yielded no definitive fuel saving. It optimistically speculated, however, that daylight saving might one day help us conserve as many as 100,000 barrels of oil a day. Based on that projection and the hope of reducing street crime, in 1986 and again this year Congress extended daylight saving by a month. But there has been no corresponding reduction in oil consumption or crime. The new four-week daylight saving extension won't save fuel or lives, but it will put our clocks seriously out of sync with Europe's, costing airlines $150 million a year. It will foul up clocks in computers, confuse trade with our continental neighbors and make it impossible for many Jews to recite sunrise prayers at home. Sure, later sunsets will encourage Americans to go outside -- to the mall or the ballpark -- but this will only put more cars on the road for more hours of the day. The petroleum industry recognized daylight saving's potential to increase gasoline consumption as early as 1920. And it is a sweet deal for retailers: candy makers have long lobbied to extend daylight saving past Halloween. In 1986, the golf industry told Congress the extension would boost fees and retail sales by as much as $400 million annually. The barbecue industry saw a $150 million bonanza. And 7-Eleven convenience stores stocked up for a $50 million rise in sales.I am a fan of long summer evenings and of social policy that promotes conservation. But I can't promise I won't turn on a light until 8:30 in the morning. Come November, wouldn't it make more sense for Congress to leave the clocks alone, ask us to turn down our thermostats at night and maybe spring for a pair of flannel pajamas?
  • 39. Strategies for Reading Texts
    Class warfareTime; New York; Mar 4, 2002; Ron Stodghill
    Abstract:Not everyone is as receptive to jRoTc's soft nudge into the rank and file. "I enjoyed [JROTC] , but I never wanted to pursue a career in the military," says the Rev. [Edward Cook], 27, a former JROTC cadet and a 1993 graduate of Jackson's Forest Hill High School. Still, as a seminary student and director of the day-care center at Greater New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Jackson, Cook says those old experiences in JROTC are proving relevant in his work today.]
  • 40. DOES
    DOES
    SAYS
    SAYS
    WHO'S GOING TO ARGUE WITH this outcome? Back in 1992 Shunta Belle was on the fast track to nowhere, "hanging around thugs and drug dealers and trying to prove myself to them." Then, as a freshman at Provine High School in Jackson, Miss., she signed up for the spit-and-shine, no-nonsense world of the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps. For the first year, Belle held on to a few of her underachieving civilian comrades. But over the next three years, she picked up new friends, a better attitude and a fresh set of goals to match. "I got serious about things," she says, "and I wanted to be around people who wanted something out of life." Today Belle, 23, is a fire fighter in her hometown department.
    It is stories like Belle's that have helped fuel the growth of JROTC. Started in 1916, JROTC established a beachhead at the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy in Norwich, Vt. Currently the program can be found in some 3,000 public schools across the nation, and its Pentagon funding is expected to rise more than 50%, from $215 million last year to $326 million by 2004. JROTC has its best-known booster in Colin Powell, who was a ROTC cadet as a student at City College of New York. As Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he decided that JROTC offered the best prescription for saving lost inner-city youths.
    "Yes, I'll admit, the armed forces might get a youngster more inclined to enlist as a result of Junior ROTC. But society got a far greater payoff," Powell later wrote in his 1995 autobiography, My American Journey. "Inner-city kids, many from broken homes, found stability and role models in junior Rom They got a taste of discipline, the work ethic, and they experienced pride of membership in something healthier than a gang."
    There are quite a few people, however, who believe that those success stories come at too high a price. After all, JROTC teaches kids how to act and think like soldiers before they are old enough to know their own mind. Critics argue that because such programs are among the few sources of additional funding for some of the nation's neediest schools, they exploit poor kids by putting them on a military track, to the exclusion of other options. The debate has heated up as a growing number of school districts have begun offering JROTC, while others in such cities as Oakland, Calif., and Chicago have scrapped conventional teaching methods to convert some schools into public military academies.
    Shunta Bell’s life experience & getting on track when started JROTC.
    Provides
    Case Study Example of + impact of JROTC
    Background info on the history, development and costs of JROTC
    JROTC started in 1916, in about 3,000 public schools in US, $$ up to $326 mil from $215 mil for 2004. Collin Powell- Poster child example
    Presents Counter argument to the positives of JROTC
    Opposition to JROTC – “success stories” have their cost
    “Exploit the neediest kids”
    “cost more than they say”
  • 41. PTR2
    P
    =
    INTRO
    roblem
    T
    hesis
    =
    BODY
    R
    easons
    =
    R
    Conclusion
    esults
  • 42. Problem
    Thesis
    Reasons
    Are military programs in the inner-city public schools rescuing at-risk kids or pushing them to become soldiers?
    WHO'S GOING TO ARGUE WITH this outcome? Back in 1992 Shunta Belle was on the fast track to nowhere, "hanging around thugs and drug dealers and trying to prove myself to them." Then, as a freshman at Provine High School in Jackson, Miss., she signed up for the spit-and-shine, no-nonsense world of the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps. For the first year, Belle held on to a few of her underachieving civilian comrades. But over the next three years, she picked up new friends, a better attitude and a fresh set of goals to match. "I got serious about things," she says, "and I wanted to be around people who wanted something out of life." Today Belle, 23, is a fire fighter in her hometown department.
    It is stories like Belle's that have helped fuel the growth of JROTC. Started in 1916, JROTC established a beachhead at the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy in Norwich, Vt. Currently the program can be found in some 3,000 public schools across the nation, and its Pentagon funding is expected to rise more than 50%, from $215 million last year to $326 million by 2004. JROTC has its best-known booster in Colin Powell, who was a ROTC cadet as a student at City College of New York. As Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he decided that JROTC offered the best prescription for saving lost inner-city youths.
    "Yes, I'll admit, the armed forces might get a youngster more inclined to enlist as a result of Junior ROTC. But society got a far greater payoff," Powell later wrote in his 1995 autobiography, My American Journey. "Inner-city kids, many from broken homes, found stability and role models in junior Rom They got a taste of discipline, the work ethic, and they experienced pride of membership in something healthier than a gang."
    There are quite a few people, however, who believe that those success stories come at too high a price. After all, JROTC teaches kids how to act and think like soldiers before they are old enough to know their own mind. Critics argue that because such programs are among the few sources of additional funding for some of the nation's neediest schools, they exploit poor kids by putting them on a military track, to the exclusion of other options. The debate has heated up as a growing number of school districts have begun offering JROTC, while others in such cities as Oakland, Calif., and Chicago have scrapped conventional teaching methods to convert some schools into public military academies.
    One of the biggest selling points of JROTC to school districts is that its matching federal funds provide a cost-effective way to broaden a school's curriculum. But that's a claim opponents say masks many hidden expenses. A recent study by the American Friends Service Committee argues, for example, that after school districts subsidize military instructors' salaries, renovate facilities to accommodate JROTC instruction and fork over for mandated field trips, JROTC is usually pricier than conventional academic programs.
    R1
    R1
  • 43. The Benefits of Mind Mapping
    Concept mapping can be done for several purposes:
    • to generate ideas (brain storming, etc.).
    • 44. to design a complex structure (long texts, large web sites, etc.);
    • 45. to communicate complex ideas.
    • 46. to aid learning by explicitly integrating new and old knowledge
    • 47. to assess understanding or diagnose misunderstanding.
    Concept maps:
    • Show relationships between ideas.
    • 48. Acts as a memory trigger.
    • 49. Makes it easier to remember information.
    • 50. Improves reading comprehension.
    • 51. Unequaled tool for organizing information.
    • 52. The act of organizing materials is studying.
  • TEXTBOOK
    CHAPTER
    STUDY GROUP
    NOTES
    What Can I
    Graphically Organize
  • 53. Comparison
  • 54. Persuasive Essay
    Supports organization of ideas
    Helps form logical arguments
    Serves as reminder of audience and purpose
  • 55. Poetic Analysis
  • 56. Concept Map Practice
    Instructions: Read the following passage on principles of classification, and do a concept map of everything you read in the passage.
    Classification consists of placing together in categories those things that resemble each other. While this sounds simple, in actual practice it may be quite difficult. First of all, we have to decide what kind of similarities are the most important for our purpose. One of the earliest classification schemes placed in one category all those organisms which lived in the same habitat. Thus fish, whales, and penguins were classified as swimming creatures. This type of classification was often based on the principle that creatures possessing analogous organs should be classified together. Analogous organs are organs that have the same function. The fins of fishes and the flippers of whales and penguins are analogous organs because they are all used for swimming. The wings of birds, bats, and insects are analogous organs that make flying possible.
    As more knowledge was gained about the anatomy of living things, it became apparent that similarities of habitat and of analogous organs were often rather superficial. The fact that bats have fur and nurse their young, birds have feathers and lay eggs, while insects are cold-blooded and have no internal skeleton suggested that these organisms differ from one another in more important ways than they resemble one another. An appreciation of the truly significant ways in which organisms resemble or differ from one another enabled the Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus to found the modern system of classification. In 1753 he published a classification of the plants which was followed, in 1758, by a classification of the animals. For this work he is often called the father of taxonomy, the name given to the study of classification. His system of classification is fundamentally the system we use today. It is based on the principle of homology. Homologous organs are organs which show the same basic structure, the same general relationship to other organs, and the same pattern of very early growth. They need not, however, share the same function. An examination of the bones of the whale's flipper, the bat's wing, and man's arm reveals the same basic pattern (Fig.2-2). Furthermore, all these appendages are found in the same part of the body and develop in similar ways. They are homologous organs, although they are used to carry out quite different functions. Linnaeus felt that the difference in function was trivial, while the homology of the organs provided a sound basis for grouping these animals together. Why is classification based upon homology so significant? The answer to this question was not given until 1859 when Charles Darwin published his theory of evolution, According to Darwin, a classification based upon the presence of homologous organs is a classification based upon kinship. He felt that all creatures sharing homologous organs is a classification based upon kinship. He felt that all creatures sharing homologous organs are related to one another, having inherited their homologous organs from a common ancestor. Thus man, the bat, and the whale all had a single ancestor who possessed the basic forelimb structure that these creatures possess - although obviously in a quite modified form - today.
    Source: http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/note-taking/class1.html
  • 57. Source: http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/note-taking/class1a.html
  • 58. Reading Efficiency Resources
    READING TEXTS
    Pre-Reading Strategies www.studygs.net/preread.htm
    Critical Reading www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/WritingResourceCenter.nsf/wholeshortlinks2/Academic+Reading
    Studying Efficiently gwired.gwu.edu/counsel/asc/index.gw/Site_ID/46/Page_ID/14536/
    Textbook Reading Strategies academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/as/208.HTM
    How to Study – Reading Resources www.howtostudy.org/resources_skill.php?id=10
    Dartmouth Academic Skills Center www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/success/reading.html
    St. Louis University Reading Resource Center www.slu.edu/x14076.xml
    Rochester Institute of Technology – Academic Support Center – On Textbook Reading www.rit.edu/studentaffairs/asc/college_programs/lng_pwr/index.php?l1=3&l2=7&location=37
    James Cook University
    Reading Efficiency - http://www.jcu.edu.au/office/tld/learningskills/effreading/
    MINDMAPPING
    Theory Behind Concept Mapping cmap.ihmc.us/Publications/ResearchPapers/TheoryCmaps/TheoryUnderlyingConceptMaps.htm
    Mindmapping Overview members.optusnet.com.au/~charles57/Creative/Mindmap/
    Reading Comprehension & Mindmapping Video www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvnbKEHOQIY&feature=related
    University of Victoria www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/reading-skills/
    James Cook University
    Mindmapping - http://www.jcu.edu.au/office/tld/learningskills/mindmap/index.html
  • 59. Fall 2010 Workshop Schedule
    Sept.
    Start the Term Right
    27 Time Management
    Start the Term Right
    Oct.
    Navigating the ESC Websites
    Critical Thinking
    Introduction Library Skills
    (10am-11am )
    Navigating the ESC Websites
    Time Management
    Critical Thinking
    Reading More Efficiently
    25 Leveraging Your learning Style
    Unblock the Writing Experience
    Nov.
    Reading more Efficiently 3
    3 Introduction to Library Skills
    Unblocking the Writing Experience
    Stress Management
    Time Management (10am-11am)
    22 Resume and Cover Letter Writing
    Dec.
    Stress Management
    Ending the Term Right
    Ending the Term Right
    Writing a Rational Essay
    Stress Management
    Resume and Cover Letter Writing
  • 60. Please give us your feedback at:
    http://bit.lyreadingeffecientworkshop
    Thank you for attending tonight's workshop If you would like to view this worship again to refresh your memory or just for fun please visit:
    www.necacademicsupport.pbworks.com