January  2011   maximizing academic success orientation 2 part presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

January 2011 maximizing academic success orientation 2 part presentation

on

  • 1,308 views

Orientation Presentation offered by the Northeast Center of Academic Support

Orientation Presentation offered by the Northeast Center of Academic Support

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,308
Views on SlideShare
1,308
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • The next pieces are the mission and intended student outcomes
  • These are the services offered by the Office of Academic Support. There are a variety of topics and ways in which we can assist students with their academic success. Updates are made frequently on the Academic Support @ NEC Website and resources will be available in the online community group in the ANGEL learning environment.
  • The next pieces are the mission and intended student outcomes
  • Smarthinking.com is a free online content area tutoring service available for all NEC students. You have a handout about this service. There are several ways to use Smarthinking – on-demand “drop-in” tutoring (similar to calling into a customer support service line – you might have to wait), a private one-on-one tutoring session that you schedule at your convenience,
  • This student will benefit from hearing audio recordings, rote oral practice, lecture or a class discussion. He or she may benefit from using a recording devise to make audio files to listen to later, by teaching another student, or conversing with the teacher. Groups of two or more, games or interaction activities provide the sounds of words being spoken that is so important to this student. This student will benefit from hearing audio recordings, rote oral practice, lecture or a class discussion. He or she may benefit from using a recording devise to make audio files to listen to later, by teaching another student, or conversing with the teacher. Groups of two or more, games or interaction activities provide the sounds of words being spoken that is so important to this student.
  • Audacity is free, open source software for recording and editing sounds. It is available for Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows, GNU/Linux, and other operating systems. You can download a free copy at http://audacity.sourceforge.net.
  • This student will benefit from a variety of books, pamphlets and written materials on several levels of difficulty. Given some time alone with a book, he or she may learn more than in a classroom setting.

January 2011 maximizing academic success orientation 2 part presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Understanding How Academics “Works” at the Northeast Center of Empire State College Maximizing Your Success Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success Orientation Presention by Dr. Lisa D’Adamo-Weinstein Northeast Center Director of Academic Support
  • 2. Agenda
    • Part 1: Academic Support Programs & Resources
      • What is it?
      • What is available?
      • How do I get support?
    • Part 2: The Pieces of Academic Success
      • What are some strategies?
      • What can I do to learn?
      • How do I learn best?
    • Questions? (Stop me and ask throughout)
    Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success
  • 3. Northeast Center Office of Academic Support Mission The staff of the Northeast Center Office of Academic Support operate as a collaborative team, striving to establish a friendly welcoming learning environment for all students. We support students in becoming successful independent learners through a comprehensive array of services and resources tailored to students’ individual academic needs and goals. We deliver these services and resources via individualized and group programming in face-to-face, telephonic and virtual formats. We work with students, staff and faculty with the expectation that willing students can reach and exceed their academic potential with appropriate assistance.
  • 4. The Pieces of Academic Success Rationale Essay Academic Research
  • 5. Northeast Center Office of Academic Support
    • Student Outcomes
    • As a result of utilizing the services and resources of the NEC Office of Academic Support, students will be able to:
      • Identify and manage their learning strengths and challenges,
      • Incorporate traditional and technology-based resources in their learning,
      • Use effective strategies in different learning engagements,
      • Create positive learning environments for themselves,
      • Increase their self-confidence while decreasing stress, and
      • Improve their academic performance and development as a life-long learner.
  • 6. FREE Academic Support Resources Available for You
  • 7. Academic Support @ NEC
    • Learning Coaches & Content Tutors
      • One-to-one appointments in person or via phone, e-mail, Internet, etc.
      • Workshops (online & onsite)
      • Small group assistance (online & onsite)
      • Online Content Area Tutoring – Smarthinking ( www.esc.edu/smarthinking )
    • Online Support
      • Webbased resource – NECAcademicSupport.Pbworks.com
      • A self-paced or credit-bearing study & resources http://AcademicEye.pbworks.com
      • On Facebook - http://on.fb.me/NortheastCenterFB
    Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success Services & Resources – Onsite & Online
  • 8. The Academic Support Team
  • 9. Meet the Learning Coaches
    • Sarah Spence-Staulters is located in Latham working with Schenectady & Latham/Albany students
    • Her hours are: Mondays 3:00pm-7:30pm
    • Wednesdays 3:00pm-7:30pm
    • Fridays 9:00am-4:00pm
    • Contact Sarah to make an appointment :
    • (518) 783-6203 ext 5992 or [email_address]
    • ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    • Kate Stockton is located in Latham working with Johnstown & Latham/Albany students
    • Her hours are: Mondays 4:00pm-7:30pm
    • Wednesdays 4:00pm-7:30pm
      • Thursdays 4:00pm-8:00pm
    • Contact Kate to make an appointment :
    • (518) 783-6203 ext 5992 or Kate.Stockton@esc.edu
    Mary Sanders-Shartle is located in Saratoga working with Saratoga & Queensbury students Her hours are: Mondays 12:00pm-2:00pm Wednesdays 3:00pm-6:00pm Thursdays 4:00pm-6:00pm Contact Mary to make an appointment : (518) 587-2100 ext 2827 or Mary.Sanders-Shartle@esc.edu ____________________________________________________________________
  • 10. Paper Time Management Tools http://necacademicsupport.pbworks.com/Student-Datebook-and-Handbook
  • 11. Electronic Time Management Tools www.empirestatecollege.thezonelive.com
  • 12. What is Smarthinking? Smarthinking is an online tutorial service that is available to students 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. www.esc.edu/smarthinking
  • 13. www.necacademicsupport.pbworks.com
  • 14.  
  • 15. Visit us on SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/NECAcademicSupport
  • 16. Web Videos and Student Learning www.youtube.com/necacademicsupport
  • 17. Access Specially Created Videos for Northeast Center Students’ Academic Success & Academic Support Resources
  • 18. Access Playlists of Videos on Academic Success Related Topics
  • 19. AcademicEye.pbworks.com Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success
  • 20. http://on.fb.me/NortheastCenterFB Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success
  • 21. Academic Success Strategies
  • 22. General Success Strategies
    • Understand how you learn best and maximize your studying strategies to match your strengths.
      • Take a learning styles inventory. The VARK is a good example; you can access it ( www.vark-learn.com )online or come to a workshop.
    • Apply your learning to your own experiences . Make connections between what you are learning and what you already know.
    • Ask questions when needed and do not let problems go unresolved! Be a self-directed and self-motivated learner.
    • Maximize your learning . Understand requirements, assignments, and methods of evaluation by reviewing
    • your learning contract(s) (aka course syllabus/syllabi).
    • Set appropriate goals to meet semester time
    • constraints, course requirements, and faculty expectations.
  • 23. Understanding What is Expected of You
    • Empire State College is reading and writing intensive.
    • The model for learning is independent and active where students take responsibility for what they are learning and work in one-to-one studies, online courses, residencies, or part of small seminars known as study groups.
    • Several strategies can assist you in being more efficient and effective with your reading, writing, and critical thinking.
      • Understanding problem solving techniques, time management principles, learning styles and identification of the overriding purpose of your studies/courses will also help you better complete your reading & writing assignments.
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26. RECEIVER * Receives & implements instructions from the EXPLAINER. * May ask questions for clarification. * May not have work checked until end of the activity. EXPLAINER * Is given information to digest. * Develops and implements a plan to convey that information to the RECEIVER. * May not check RECEIVER'S work until the end of the activity. ROLES for ACTIVITY
  • 27. THE ANSWER Pablo Picasso’s Don Quixote
  • 28.  
  • 29. Pablo Picasso’s Don Quixote
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38. Problem Solving
    • First, you have to understand the problem .
    • After understanding, then make a plan .
    • Carry out the plan .
    • Look back & ask – How could the plan be improved ?
    • Source : George Pólya (1945) How to Solve It
    The INK BLOTS activity forces you to use problem solving skills that can be compared to the process of writing a research paper. The steps for conducing research include, identifying a topic, researching/understanding all the details related to that topic, and translating your research/ understanding into a format for your audience to understand. If you follow the problem solving steps listed in the gray box above, the process for understanding the seemingly unconnected bits of information in the picture becomes much easier. You need to get a sense of the larger picture and not focus on the separate details of the picture as unconnected to a framework of understanding. Once you find a way to look at the information (the problem) and process the information into meaningful chunks/frameworks for understanding (make a plan) , it becomes easier to organize your thinking and present your ideas in a way that others can understand. You evaluate the effectiveness of your plan as you translate your ideas to your audience and determine if they could understand what you where trying to convey. The Problem 3 Ways to Organize Your Thoughts/ Have an Overall Plan of Understanding/ Transmitting Your Understanding to Others 1 Grid 2 Compare To Known 3 Make new connections Pablo Picasso’s “ Don Quixote” Knight on a horse
  • 39. Problem Solving
    • Understand the problem/assignment
        • See the big picture first
    • Devise a plan to solve the problem/complete the assignment
        • Understand what details make up the big picture and how you intend to convey your understanding
    • Implement your plan
        • Communicate your understanding
    • Evaluate your effectiveness in solving the problem/ completing the assignment
        • ASK YOURSELF - “What will make me a better learner in the future?”
  • 40. Schema A schema in general is a specific, well-documented, and consistent plan. The related word, scheme means a loosely described plan. A schema (pl. schemata ), in psychology and cognitive science , is a mental structure (prior knowledge) that represents some aspect of the world. People use schemata to organize current knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding.
  • 41. Schema as a Net Think of SCHEMA as a fishing net. The first time you put the net in the water, you gather a lot of big fish. Over time, however, as the net’s holes shrink from use, the smaller holes allow for smaller fish to be captured. In essence, you get more fish each time your dip your net into the water. So, the more you activate your schema before you try to study, the more details you will pick up as you read, complete an assignment, or simply get to understand what your course is all about and try to manage your school workload.
  • 42. Time Management
  • 43. Time is a Valuable Commodity
    • We all have the same amount of time ~
      • 60 seconds in a minute,
      • 60 minutes in an hour,
      • 24 hours in a day,
      • 168 hours in a week,
      • 720 hours in a month,
      • And 8,760 in a year.
    • Time cannot be saved and it does not gain interest.
    • There are no rollover minutes!
    • How are you spending your time???
  • 44. Reality Check Approximately 10-16 hours per week is the optimum time for successful completion of a 4-credit study. In addition, it is important for you to have as regular a schedule as you can manage to meet the deadlines for assignments.
  • 45.
      • Consider what you know about your constraints and how you prefer to organize yourself.
      • Pick the appropriate strategies and tool(s) to help you best organize your time.
      • Remember to be consistent with how you utilize your time management strategies and tools, and that all tools are not for everyone.
      • Know what you have to do and how
      • much time you have available to complete
      • your assignments.
    Enhancing Your Personal Time Management System
  • 46. Review Learning Contract aka Course Syllabus = Key Concepts = Critical Thinking Skills = Benefit to You
  • 47. = Key Concepts = Critical Thinking Skills = Expectations & Requirements Review Learning Contract aka Course Syllabus
  • 48. Review Learning Contract aka Course Syllabus = Key Materials = Due Date = Requirements
  • 49. Planning for Your 1 st Set of Assignments ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
  • 50. Planning for Your 1 st Set of Assignments Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday SEPTEMBER 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Term Begins ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 1 & 16 2 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 17 & 18 & 19 18 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ORG BEHAVIOR Read & Take Notes Activity 12.5 & Start Write-up Case 4 (4-6 pages) OCTOBER 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ORG BEHAVIOR Final Draft of Write up Case 4 (4-6 pages) 5 8 9 10 11 All Work Due 12 13 14 Columbus Day ORG BEHAVIOR Readings & Case 4 Due
  • 51. Planning for Your 1 st Set of Assignments Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday SEPTEMBER 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Term Begins ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 1 & 16 2 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 17 & 18 & 19 18 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ORG BEHAVIOR Read & Take Notes Activity 12.5 & Start Write-up Case 4 (4-6 pages) OCTOBER 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ORG BEHAVIOR Final Draft of Write up Case 4 (4-6 pages) 5 8 9 10 11 All Work Due 12 13 14 Columbus Day ORG BEHAVIOR Readings & Case 4 Due ECONOMICS All due by 5 th week of term
  • 52. Planning for Your 1 st Set of Assignments Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday SEPTEMBER 1 Term Begins 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ECONOMICS Read Chap 1 Do QFT - 2 & 5 Do P&E - 1, 5 &10 ECONOMICS Read Chap 2 Do QFT – 3, 11, 16 Do P&E – 3 & 4 ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 1 & 16 2 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ECONOMICS Read Chap 3 Do QFT – 8 & 15 Do P&E – 4 & 5 ECONOMICS Read Chap 4 Do QFT – 3,8,14,15 Do P&E – 2 & 3 ORG BEHAVIOR Read Chaps 17 & 18 & 19 18 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ECONOMICS Read Chap 6 Do QFT – 1, 9, 13 Do P&E – 8, 14, 17 ECONOMICS Read Chap 8 Do QFT – 1 & 2 Do P&E - 1, 7 & 9 ORG BEHAVIOR Read & Take Notes Activity 12.5 & Start Write-up Case 4 (4-6 pages) OCTOBER 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ECONOMICS Read Chap 9 Do QFT – 1 & 5 Do P&E - 1,3,5a,5b ORG BEHAVIOR Final Draft of Write up Case 4 (4-6 pages) 5 8 9 10 11 All Work Due 13 14 Columbus Day ECON PROBS & ORG BEHAVIOR Readings & Case 4 Due
  • 53. Learning Styles
  • 54. Identifying Your Learning Style AURAL/ AUDITORY KINESTHETIC READ/ WRITE VISUAL MULTI- MODAL
  • 55. Characteristics of Visual Learners
    • Easily remember information presented in pictures, charts or diagrams.
    • Have strong visualization skills. They can look up and “see” the information invisibly written or drawn.
    • Make “movies in their minds” of information they are reading. Their movies are often vivid and detailed.
    • Have very strong visual-spatial understanding of things such as sizes, textures, angles and three-dimensional depths.
    • Pay close attention to the body language of others (facial expressions, eyes, stance, etc.).
    • Have a keen sense of aesthetics, visual media and art.
    VISUAL Visual learners tend to:
  • 56. Study Tips for Visual Learners
    • Convert info into visual study tools (diagrams, maps, charts)
    • Visualize & make movies as you read and study.
    • Add pictures to as many study tools as possible.
    • Use "color coding" of new information in your textbook or notes. Using highlighter pens, highlight different kinds of information in contrasting colors.
    • Copy & write new info - see it in your own writing.
    • Use nonverbal clue’s by instructors to provide you with important information.
    • Always write down important information or directions.
  • 57. Characteristics of Aural/Auditory Learners
    • Remember quite accurately details of important information heard during conversations or lectures.
    • Have strong language skills, which include a well-developed vocabulary and an appreciation for words.
    • Have strong oral communication skills. They can carry or interesting conversations and can articulate their ideas clearly.
    • Have a “fine tuned ear” auditory may lead to learning a foreign language more easily.
    • Often have musical talents, can hear tones, rhythms, and individual notes.
    Aural/Auditory learners tend to: AURAL/ AUDITORY
  • 58. Study Tips for Auditory Learners
    • Talk out loud and recite information regularly.
    • Discuss/study with friends.
    • Record information and listen to it.
    • Add rhythms or tunes to your learning.
    • Use computerized technology – Text to Speech in Word , Audacity , Natural Reader ,
    • etc.
  • 59.
    • Work well with their hands and may be good at repairing work, sculpting, art or working with various tools.
    • Often have well coordinated and have a strong sense of timing and body movement.
    • Learn with movement = often do well as performers: athletes, actors, or dancers.
    • Often wiggle, tap feet or move their legs when seated.
    • Have been often labeled “hyperactive” as children.
    Characteristics of Kinesthetic Learners Kinesthetic learners tend to: KINESTHETIC
  • 60. Study Tips for Kinesthetic Learners
    • Type or use a word processor – take notes as you read including graphic organizing.
    • Pace as you study.
    • Make larger-sized study tools – flipcharts, chalk/white boards.
    • Learn by doing.
    • Use case studies, examples and applications.
    • Use your hands and your fine motor skills. Study with pen/pencil in hand.
    • Use exaggerated movement for emphasis and expression.
  • 61.
    • Like lists and words to keep ideas and “To Do” items straight.
    • Remember information displayed as words.
    • Emphasize text-based input and output - reading and writing in all its forms.
    • Prefer PowerPoint, the Internet, lists, filofaxes, dictionaries, thesauri, quotations and words, words, words...
    Characteristics of Read/Write Learners Read/Write learners tend to: READ/ WRITE
  • 62. Study Tips for Read/Write Learners
    • Use a word processor – take notes as you read.
    • Use dictionaries and/or make flashcards to remember key vocabulary.
    • Write out the words again and again.
    • Read your notes (silently) again and again.
    • Rewrite the ideas and principles into other words.
    • Organize any diagrams, graphs ... into statements, e.g. "The trend is..."
    • Turn reactions, actions, diagrams, charts and flows into words.
  • 63. Life is multimodal. Seldom are there instances where one mode is used, or is sufficient. There are those who prefer many modes almost equally are of two types. Others choose a single mode to suit the occasion or situation. There are others who are not satisfied until they have had input (or output) in all of their preferred modes. They take longer to gather information from each mode and, as a result, they often have a deeper and broader understanding. AURAL/ AUDITORY KINESTHETIC READ/ WRITE VISUAL MULTI- MODAL
  • 64. Questions? Contact Northeast Center Office of Academic Support      E-mail      [email_address]      Phone     518-783-6203 ext 5939      Mail        Office of Academic Support                     SUNY Empire State College – Northeast Center                     21 British American Blvd.                      Latham, NY 12110 http://www.necacademicsupport.pbworks.com Helping You Connect the Pieces for Academic Success