• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

2011 UniServ Skills: Harnessing Social Media

on

  • 657 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
657
Views on SlideShare
656
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://uniserv-skills-session.groupsite.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • There are a lot of definitions available that define what “Social Media” is. For the purposes of our conversation today I want you to think of social media in these terms:”Social Media” is an umbrella term that describes multiple internet-based platforms. In general these platforms have a number of things in common, including:-Empowering user-generated content-Facilitating commentary and conversation (dialogue)-Facilitating the sharing of content-Enabling people to connect with one another despite location-Empowering collaboration on topics of mutual interestSome of the platforms under the concept of “Social Media” include:-Social Networking: also referred to as Social Networking Service (SNS) – e.g. Facebook, MySpace, Linkedin-Blogging: the term ‘Blog’ is short for ‘Web Log’ and is one of the oldest forms of social media dating back around 10 years. Blogs can be as simple as text entries on a website. Most blogs today are facilitated by blog hosting services that use web-based software to allow for easy editing and addition of photos and video – e.g. Wordpress, Blogger-Micro-blogging: Micro-blogs started as a means of sending short snippets of content that could be easily sent and read as cell phone text messages. This kind of platform has involved its own ecosystem which includes various forms of URL Shortening services, photo and video hosting, and geo-tagging. Micro-blogging is frequently associated with mobile posting given its origins – e.g. Twitter, Yammer, Pownce-Wikis: Wikis are websites or services that are used for collaborative work. Wikis include groups working on documents or projects to crowd sourcing of information from the general public – e.g. Wikipedia-Photos & Video Sharing: As the coding for the web has advanced and the pervasiveness of broadband connections increased, the additional bandwidth has facilitated services that host and share still imagery and video content – e.g. Flickr, YouTube, Vimeo
  • Social MediaIt is immediate – Social media facilitates the ability to post content and have it immediately available to content consumers.It is unmediated – Social media offers few to no gatekeepers for content. What you post is what is made availableIt is a dialogue, which…Increases the efficiency of your communication – by receiving feedback you are better able to assess how effective you are at communicatingCreates greater trust with those you communicate with by building a relationship – by building a positive relationship with your audience they have a greater sense of trust in what you say.‘Social’ is how people communicate – Social Media is an extension of how people already communicate, that’s why it has proven to be an effective means of communicatingLead the conversation or be led by it – Conversations about you, your command, and issues of concern happen with or without your participation. If you don’t participate, you lose a chance to engage in the conversation about subjects that are important!
  • Authenticity – It is critical that people know who you are in social media. If they can’t be sure who you are then they won’t trust you and won’t form a relationship with you.Transparency – When communicating in social media you need to be as transparent as possible with those who are listening. Telling people something they don’t want to hear or that you don’t know is preferable to silence. When people understand that you will be straight forward with them they will trust what you say more.Sincerity – People want to know that they are connecting with a real person. Be sincere, show personality and more people will listen and talk to youDialogue over monologue – Social media favors a conversation with others. If all you do is talk, then soon you’ll find that no one else is listeningThere is only one “you” – Gone are the days when you could think of yourself in separate roles that would seldom meet like your work and home life. No gatekeeper – What you say is what is heard (whether that is understood is another matter)Digital is fast – Content is available as soon as it is publishedDigital is forever – Once content is on the web, and especially in social media, it will always exist on some server somewhereDigital is everywhere – with mobile devices, connection to the digital world can take place virtually anywhereResistance is futile – You can avoid using social media but if you want to connect with people, you have to do it where they are communicating and increasingly this is happening in social media
  • We are only able to use Social Media sites as an extension of our already existing websites – not instead of them.Your websites are what keep you in compliance with a number of regulations and laws -- so they are not optionalFor example compliance with record keeping, access to the handicapped (Section 508 compliance)Content you post on a social media site needs to exist in some form on a .mil website (e.g. photos, press releases, stories, etc.)Content unique to social media and derivative of content already present on a .mil site does not necessarily need to be on a .mil site (e.g. status update on Facebook, post on Twitter)
  • – getting info out, getting answers
  • – getting info out, getting answers
  • Social media, by itself, is not the solution to all of your communication challenges and it is not a communication strategy.However, social media as part of an overall communication plan is a powerful tool.

2011 UniServ Skills: Harnessing Social Media 2011 UniServ Skills: Harnessing Social Media Presentation Transcript

  • Harnessing Social Media for Association Work
    Social media in all forms are becoming the dominant form of interaction of the Net. Whether blogging, Twittering, or using Facebook or Groupsites, collective action for the 21st Century is about harnessing relationships and engaging every person in your “network” as an organizer.
    In this hands-on session, you will learn how to harness Web 2.0 tools to increase the reach, impact, and effectiveness of Association Programs along with tips and tricks for creating a professional and functional social media presence.
    Developed by SocialFish and NEA
  • Introductions
    Note to participants: 
    Please sign in to http://uniserv-skills-session.groupsite.com
    Please take our Introductory Survey... You’ll find it on the homepage.
  • Who’s in the Room?
    What’s your name
    What’s your role in your local association?
    How much experience do you have with Social Media? (i.e. do you use email, Facebook, Twitter or other online tools?)
  • The Plan for Today
    What’s Web 2.0?
    Outposts vs. Homebase
    Intro to Facebook & Twitter
    Do’s and Don’ts
    Using NEA’s Free Toolkit: Groupsite
    Pulling it all together
    What organizing and technology have in common
  • What is Web 2.0?
    Social Networking in Plain English
  • The Glossary
    Social Networking:
    • Facebook
    • MySpace
    • Friendster
    Collaborating/ knowledge sharing:
    -Wikis
    -Message boards
    -Forums
    -Podcasts
    Content sharing:
    -You Tube
    -Flickr
    -Vimeo
    -Photobucket
    Blogging:
    -Blogger
    -Wordpress
    -Tumblr
    -Twitter (micro-blogging)
  • What is social media?
    “Social Media” is an umbrella term for describing internet-based, digital communication that enables social interaction to occur more easily despite both time and distance.
    Social Media favors conversation over monologue and empowers people to be not just content consumers but content producers.
    Social Media includes:
    Social Networking
    Blogging
    Micro-blogging (Twitter, Yammer)
    Wikis
    Photo & Video Sharing
  • Social media characteristics
    Social Media
    It is immediate
    It is unmediated
    It is a dialogue, which…
    Increases the efficiency of your communication
    Creates greater trust with those you communicate with by building a relationship
    ‘Social’ is how people communicate
    Lead the conversation or be led by it
  • Social media values
    Authenticity
    Transparency
    Sincerity
    Dialogue over monologue
    There is only one “you”
    No gatekeeper
    Digital is fast
    Digital is forever
    Digital is everywhere
    Resistance is futile
  • Concentrate on the relationshipsNOT the technology!
    Run when you hear “Twitter Strategy” or “Facebook Strategy” -- it’s putting the cart before the horse.
    Instead, focus on how you’ll engage members.
    Then choose a program objective.
  • It’s not about the tools
    Don’t Fondle the Hammer
    Jessica Hagy, Indexed Blog
  • Social Networking
    Contrary to public perception, most of the groups that form on social networking sites are not made up of strangers. Although people may browse profiles of others who are unknown to them, most use social networking sites to support preexisting real-life social groups.
  • The following features define social networks and distinguish them from other types of Web sites:
    The profile page: a page that allows you to describe yourself through text, video, and music
    A network of friends: a public or semipublic list of friends, usually displayed as small photographic icons
    A public commenting system: allows friends and strangers to write a short note or statement that will be displayed publicly on your profile page
    A private messaging system: enables friends to send private messages to you via your profile page
    Widgets or Embedded Media: Widgets are small chunks of Web contents, such as graphics, video clips, or animations that you can put on your Web site
  • Why should we care about Web 2.0?
    SocialnomicsVideo
  • What’s in a NUMBER?
    Over 80 percent of Americans use social media tools and Web sites monthly
    Social networking is now the #1 activity on the web
    Twitter: 27 Million users in October 2009
    Facebook: 400 million users
    You Tube: 924 million unique visitors each year
  • American teens sent an average of 3,146 texts a month in 2010
    That’s 10 text messages per hour they are not in school or sleeping, according to research by The Nielsen Company.
  • Change in internet use by age, 2000-2010
  • Top 10 Sectors by Share of Internet Time
  • Profile on Social Networking site by Age
  • Gadget Ownership, 2010
  • Conversation
    Collaboration
    CollectiveAction
    Hitting the Bullseye
  • Your Focus
    Social Focus
    Conversation
    Collaboration
    Advocacy
    Events
    CollectiveAction
    ProgramDevelopment
  • Sweet Spots
    Advocacy
    Events
    ProgramDevelopment
  • Listening & Responding
    Where to start?
    • SocialMention
    • Addictomatic
    • HowSociable?
    • Google Alerts
    • Backtype*
    • Google Reader
    • Filter by Subscriptions
    Keyword Listening Tools
  • The Plan for Today
    What’s Web 2.0?
    Outposts vs. Homebase
    Intro to Facebook & Twitter
    Do’s and Don’ts
    Using NEA’s Free Toolkit: Groupsite
    Pulling it all together
    What organizing and technology have in common
  • Outposts vs Home base
    What’s the difference between an outpost and a home base?
    (issues) (branded URL)
  • Social media is an extension of your web presence
  • The Biggies
    Facebook
    Best for: Issues & Advocacy
  • Read Across America Facebook
  • NEA Facebook
  • The Biggies
    Twitter
    Best for: Quick Communication
    • Getting info out
    • Gathering info
  • NEA Today on Twitter
  • The Biggies
    A blog is a conversational web site, typically offering news or opinion on a certain topic.
    Blogs should be written conversationally, and should be short – think op-ed length and e-mail tone.
    Determine how you’re already being talked about in the blogosphere before you engage yourself.
    70 percent of reporters now say they use blogs for story ideas.
    Blogs
  • EdVoices Blog
  • Online etiquette
  • What you say online doesn’t stay online
    Status messages or posts, particularly as they pertain to your employers or coworkers, can have real life repercussions
  • Stay in your lanet
    Stay in your lane
    If you’re not the expert on a topic, don’t comment like you are. Keep in mind: reporters can quote online interactions.
  • Talk to your family
    Basic tips for social media include:
    -Don’t friend anyone you don’t know on Facebook or social networking platforms
    -Don’t post information about when you’re going on vacation or when your spouse/parent will be away.
    -Know how to set your privacy settings, and use them.
  • Do’s and Don’ts
    Do: review and restrict your Facebook Privacy Settings
    Don’t: do not “friend” students and parents
    Do: Use common sense when you’re using social media.
    Don’t: Post vulgar or obscene language, materials, photos or links that may be considered inappropriate or unprofessional.
    Note: look for NEA-PR-GC-SocialNetworkingDosandDonts.pdf in the ALE Groupsite file cabinet
  • NEA’s Web 2.0 Toolkit
    Best for:
    • Quick & easy website creation
    • Sharing info (text, photos, videos…)
    • Engaging members
  • When You Develop Your Plan…
    How could you use Groupsite? Use it for…
    #1: Getting the word out
    #2: Publicizing events
    #3: Enabling members to share information
    #4: Encouraging members to talk with each other
    #5: Getting your members more engaged
    #6: Measuring your effectiveness
  • Groupsites
    Boise Education Association
    Metropolitan Nashville Education Association
    Wisconsin National Board Network
    Inside KNEA
    Education International 6th World Congress
    NEA Western Regional Leadership Conference
    Ohio Campaign 2010 Planning site
  • Metropolitan Nashville Education Association
  • Wisconsin National Board Network
  • The Plan for Today
    What’s Web 2.0?
    Outposts vs. Homebase
    Intro to Facebook & Twitter
    Do’s and Don’ts
    Using NEA’s Free Toolkit: Groupsite
    Pulling it all together
    What organizing and technology have in common
  • Pulling it all together
    Embedding YouTube videos
    Creating a Poll or Survey with PollDaddy.com
    Putting your Tweets on a web page using a Widget
  • The Plan for Today
    What’s Web 2.0?
    Outposts vs. Homebase
    Intro to Facebook & Twitter
    Do’s and Don’ts
    Using NEA’s Free Toolkit: Groupsite
    Pulling it all together
    What organizing and technology have in common
  • What Organizing and Technology have in common
    • Move people to action
    • Create power
    • Appeal to self-interests
    • Are both a science and an art
    • Build organizational capacity
    “Organizingis a fancy word for relationship building.”Ernesto Cortes
  • 55
    Social media should be a part of your communications strategy
    Social media alone is not a communication strategy…
    Publishing – Print & Web
    Social Media
    Newspapers/ Newsletters
    COMM PLAN
    Imagery
    Personal engagements
    Earned Media
    Nea.org
    Email
    … it is one key component of your overall communication plan
    Requirements
    55
  • Creators
    Social Technographics classifies people according to how they use social technologies.
    Critics
    Collectors
    Joiners
    Spectators
    Inactives
    The Social Technographics™ Ladder
  • Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators make social content go. They write blogs or upload video, music, or text.
    Creators
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Critics respond to content from others. They post reviews, comment on blogs, participate in forums, and edit wiki articles.
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
    The Social Technographics™ Ladder
  • The Social Technographics™ Ladder
    Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Collectors organize content for themselves or others using RSS feeds, tags, and voting sites like Digg.com
    Use RSS feeds
    Add “tags” to Web pages or photos
    “Vote” for Web sites online
    Collectors
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • The Social Technographics™ Ladder
    Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Use RSS feeds
    Add “tags” to Web pages or photos
    “Vote” for Web sites online
    Collectors
    Joiners connect in social networks like MySpace and Facebook
    Maintain profile on a social networking site
    Visit social networking sites
    Joiners
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • The Social Technographics™ Ladder
    Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Use RSS feeds
    Add “tags” to Web pages or photos
    “Vote” for Web sites online
    Collectors
    Maintain profile on a social networking site
    Visit social networking sites
    Joiners
    Spectators consumer social content including blogs, user-generated video, podcasts, forums, or reviews
    Read blogs
    Watch video from other users
    Listen to podcasts
    Read online forums
    Read customer ratings/reviews
    Spectators
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • The Social Technographics™ Ladder
    Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Use RSS feeds
    Add “tags” to Web pages or photos
    “Vote” for Web sites online
    Collectors
    Maintain profile on a social networking site
    Visit social networking sites
    Joiners
    Read blogs
    Watch video from other users
    Listen to podcasts
    Read online forums
    Read customer ratings/reviews
    Spectators
    None of the above
    Inactives
    Inactives neither create nor consume social content of any kind
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • The Social Technographics™ Ladder
    Publish a blog
    Publish your own Web pages
    Upload video you created
    Upload audio/music you created
    Write articles or stories and post them
    Creators
    Post ratings/reviews of products/services
    Comment on someone else’s blog
    Contribute to online forums
    Contribute to/edit articles in a wiki
    Critics
    Use RSS feeds
    Add “tags” to Web pages or photos
    “Vote” for Web sites online
    Collectors
    Maintain profile on a social networking site
    Visit social networking sites
    Joiners
    Read blogs
    Watch video from other users
    Listen to podcasts
    Read online forums
    Read customer ratings/reviews
    Spectators
    None of the above
    Taken together, these groups make up the ecosystem that of Social Media.
    By examining how they are represented in any subgroup, you can determine which sorts of strategies make sense to reach your members.
    Creators
    Critics
    Collectors
    Joiners
    Spectators
    Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly.
  • Be an Organizer
    Your role is to provide structure and guidance and to encourage communication among supporters
    To be effective in this environment, you have to behave like an organizer: identify and develop leadership and encourage supporters to reach out to each other.
    In social networks, online groups behave a lot like offline groups.
  • Guidelines for Developing a Community Strategy
    “Build it and they will come” doesn’t work!
    Key goals to keep in mind:
    #1: Help people work together
    #2: Adoption can not be mandated
    #3: Don’t assume everyone works the same way
    #4: Liberate information
    #5: Develop strategies for group engagement
    #6: Identify specific ways to measure and evaluate community-building efforts
    Excerpted From the Online Community Report, January 28, 2008
  • Tips on what works
    Choose the right message
    Develop a communication strategy
    Schedule a timely release of information
    Keep it concise
    Synchronize efforts on all platforms
    Post photos or videos of the day
    Develop a mixed dose of ‘medicine’ and fun
    Keep the conversation moving
  • Questions to Consider …
    What do you need to accomplish?
    Who are the people who can help you?
    What do you need them to do?
    How can you encourage members interact with one another on your site?
    What are you asking members to do?
    What actions and behaviors are valued?
    Develop a list of actions that you'd like members to take and create easy ways to do them.
    Create mechanisms to motivate offline action.
  • Resources
    The Networked Nonprofit: Connecting with Social Media to Drive Change, by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine http://www.bethkanter.org/http://afine2.wordpress.com/
    Open Community: A little book of big ideas for associations navigating the social web, by Maddie Grant and Lindy Dreyer http://www.socialfish.org
  • Don BlakeSenior Technologist dblake@nea.orgSkype/Twitter: donaldblake
    Maddie Grant, CAEChief Social Media Strategist maddie@socialfish.orgSkype/Twitter: maddiegrant
    Lorraine WilsonNEA ITSlwilson@nea.orgTwitter: NEALorraineBlog: lwilson.wordpress.com
    Sarah FergusonPriority Schools Programsferguson@nea.org
    Lindy DreyerChief Social Media Marketer lindy@socialfish.orgSkype/Twitter: lindydreyer
    http://www.socialfish.org