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The BIG Assist Conference - Marketisation Workshop by Caron Bembrick (FUSE).
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The BIG Assist Conference - Marketisation Workshop by Caron Bembrick (FUSE).

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This presentation was part of the Big Assist Conference. …

This presentation was part of the Big Assist Conference.

Caron Marie Bembrick (Sheffield TLI Programme Coordinator) put on a marketisation workshop.

Find out more about NCVO events: http://www.ncvo.org.uk/training-and-events

Published in: Business, Education

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  • 1. www.fusesheffield.org.uk Caron Marie Bembrick Sheffield TLI Programme Coordinator 1
  • 2. www.fusesheffield.org.uk 2
  • 3. • Organisation contact details • Legal structure • Where they work • Who they work with • Why they require FUSE funding and how the funding will help the organisation • Income level Fund contribution towards the cost of FUSE providers’ services: • 90% (£0-£50k) • 80% (£51-150k) • 70% (£151-250k) • 50% (£251k+) • Maximum allowed per organisation is £750 • Remaining amount and VAT to be paid for by the CSO Eligibility www.fusesheffield.org.uk 3
  • 4. Provider Accreditation Ensure providers possess a track record of delivering high quality infrastructure services and implement a commitment to customer focus and equality and diversity in service design and delivery. www.fusesheffield.org.uk 4
  • 5. Process www.fusesheffield.org.uk 5
  • 6. Results So Far Since its launch in January 2013 • 134 applications • Majority of applicants have lower income or high income (few in between) • For some CSOs the fund has been only a small part of purchasing with some organisations spending more than the contribution required • Some CSOs have prioritised choice because of VAT implications • Multiple take-up of services (e.g. HR, legal and finance for due diligence/mergers) • Cross-agency purchasing e.g. training from SYFAB and VAS • Key types – children and young people provision. Cohort of citizen’s advice centres • Deprived neighbourhoods www.fusesheffield.org.uk 6
  • 7. Challenges for the Provider • Displacement of existing income • Pricing • Clarity of provision and fitting into the service directory – where does the holistic capacity building service sit? • Some CSOs still require assistance with understanding their needs – is this provider led? • Some providers do not fit the directory mould • Duplication • Capacity • Can individual providers claim to deliver a service if they signpost or bring in expertise? www.fusesheffield.org.uk 7
  • 8. Thank you www.fusesheffield.org.uk 8
  • 9. Hostedby: Fundedby: The changing infrastructure landscape an unsettled state and an uncertain future Rob Macmillan Third Sector Research Centre University of Birmingham
  • 10. The ‘unsettlement’….of infrastructure 1. changing demands and challenges facing frontline organisations – tailored support for a competitive environment? 2. withdrawal of central state support for national and local infrastructure – ‘de-coupling’ 3. income generation and a changing geography of infrastructure; TLI as unfinished business from ChangeUp? – ‘reconfiguration’ 4. changing delivery mechanisms - on-line support; peer to peer learning; pro-bono; community organising; prime contracting; ‘fiscal sponsorship’, incubation and shelter 5. ‘demand-led’ approaches - market making in infrastructure? 6. rethinking functions and staffing of infrastructure organisations - hollowing out
  • 11. Implications – challenges and opportunities • ‘Customers’ o what support do we need, or want? (and do we know?) o do we want to shop for it, and if so how do we choose? o how will we know if it is any good? • ‘Suppliers’ o how do we reach ‘customers’? how do they know about us? o what is our business model and organisational structure? o what niche can we occupy in relation to other providers? o how do we set and adjust our prices? • ‘Market makers’ o is there a viable market for chargeable support services? o how far should it be ‘managed’ or left open? o how is quality understood and assured? o what support is available for new, smaller or marginalised groups? o what about ‘voice’ and advocacy?
  • 12. In small groups…. Discuss • What are you doing or planning to do about the changes we’ve been discussing? • What experience can you share with each other? • What are the dilemmas and challenges in selling services, and how can you overcome them? Identify one or two key questions or dilemmas to feedback to the group as a whole. (roughly 25 minutes)

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