How to strengthen theengagement of Civil Society inStructural Funds? Ideas fromthe United KingdomIngrid GardinerESF Effect...
•These estimates refer to the voluntary sector only – based on the general charities definitionThe UK voluntarysector: at ...
The civil society mosaicNational and local charities | Arts and Cultural organisationsIndependent Schools | Foundations | ...
Basic Factsabout NCVO• Established in 1919• England wide remit• Cross-sectoral approach• 8000+ member organisations• c. 90...
How is NCVOFinanced?
What NCVOdoesTraining & Capacity Building on key areas:• Governance & Leadership• Sustainable Funding• Campaigning, Collab...
Overview ofStructural Funds• European Social Fund (ESF), European RegionalDevelopment Fund (ERDF), the EuropeanAgricultura...
ESF – A past andcurrent perspectivein the UK
Region Total Contract value Contracts Subs Av. Contract Value Av. no of subcontractsCornwall £95,525,918 38 173 £2,513,840...
•Region Total Contract value % Contracts % Av. Value No. of subcontracts•Cornwall £1,599,081 1.7% 2 5.3% £799,541 81•East ...
StructuralFunds: What ishappening Economic landscape : recession EU budget & Structural Funds in particular :MORE focuss...
EU Common strategicframework investmentthemes1. Innovation and R&D2. ICT: Improving access; quality and usage3. SMEs: Impr...
European Commission’sUK prioritiesStructural Funds• Increasing R&D spend &‘localising’ impact of national investment• Impr...
Local focus :new opportunitiesMore integrated programmes/ geographic flexibility• Community-led local development (all 4 f...
Priorities for CSOs Support the Commission’s proposal to ring-fence at least20% of ESF for social inclusion and anti-pove...
Priorities for CSOs Support for financial instruments (mixed grant/loan funding)for Civil Society Increased promotion of...
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How to strengthen engagement of civil society in structural funds

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Ingrid Gardiner (ESF Effectiveness Manager) discussed how to strengthen engagement of civil society in structural funds.

This presentation was given to the European Commission in Croatia, September 2012.

Find out more about NCVO's European policy work: http://europeanfundingnetwork.eu/

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
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  • Exploring the breakdown of civil society's income in more detail, we can see that general charities form the largest segment of civil society with an income of £36.7 billion, closely followed by employee-owned businesses at £30.0 billion and universities at £26.7 billion.
  • So, here is an overview of the types of organisation that form civil society – as you can see there are a wide range of organisational types from national and local charities, through to universities, political parties, credit unions and cooperatives. We estimate that there are about 900,000 organisations that form civil society. These organisations have an income of XXX billion and a workforce of X.X million.
  • How to strengthen engagement of civil society in structural funds

    1. 1. How to strengthen theengagement of Civil Society inStructural Funds? Ideas fromthe United KingdomIngrid GardinerESF Effectiveness Manageringrid.gardiner@ncvo-vol.org.uk
    2. 2. •These estimates refer to the voluntary sector only – based on the general charities definitionThe UK voluntarysector: at the heartof civil society
    3. 3. The civil society mosaicNational and local charities | Arts and Cultural organisationsIndependent Schools | Foundations | Development TrustsUniversities | Trusts | Trade Unions | Housing AssociationsFriendly Societies Faith groupsBuilding Societies MuseumsScouts & Guides Social clubsPolitical Parties Credit UnionsCo-operatives‘Below the radar’ community groups | Armed Forces charitiesExempt charities | Community Interest Companies (CICs)Community Amateur Sports Clubs (CASCs) | Industrial andProvident Societies (IPSs) | Social Enterprises | Charitiesestablished by Royal Charter | Excepted CharitiesCommunity Benefit Societies (BenComs) | NCVO•data.ncvo-vol.org.uk - comment, analysis, download•900,000 organisations•Income of £170 billion•Assets of £228 billion•Workforce of 2.0 million
    4. 4. Basic Factsabout NCVO• Established in 1919• England wide remit• Cross-sectoral approach• 8000+ member organisations• c. 90 staff• £12 million approx. income
    5. 5. How is NCVOFinanced?
    6. 6. What NCVOdoesTraining & Capacity Building on key areas:• Governance & Leadership• Sustainable Funding• Campaigning, Collaboration & ICT• Workforce Development• Helpdesk• Pilots, knowledge sharing and new ways ofworking• Co-ordinates the European FundingNetwork
    7. 7. Overview ofStructural Funds• European Social Fund (ESF), European RegionalDevelopment Fund (ERDF), the EuropeanAgricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD)and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund(EMFF).• In the 2007-2013, programme worth over £2.5billion ESF + £2.5 billion national funding• Programme themes – innovation & transnationalapproaches, community grants, and technicalassistance• Who can access funding? private, public andcivil society organisations
    8. 8. ESF – A past andcurrent perspectivein the UK
    9. 9. Region Total Contract value Contracts Subs Av. Contract Value Av. no of subcontractsCornwall £95,525,918 38 173 £2,513,840 5East Mids £619,794,365 124 130 £4,998,342 1East £295,851,025 105 530 £2,817,629 5Gibraltar £4,246,096 5 0 £849,219 0London £559,894,315 299 811 £1,872,556 3Merseyside £113,819,351 97 363 £1,173,395 4NE £305,107,221 81 196 £3,766,756 2NW £126,666,576 108 498 £1,172,839 5SE £315,709,388 77 386 £4,100,122 5SW £119,862,206 76 297 £1,577,134 4South Yorks £68,019,270 23 321 £2,957,360 14West Mids £316,354,291 131 60 £2,414,918 0Y & Humber £471,911,955 48 342 £9,831,499 7Eng Total £3,412,761,977 1212 4107 £2,815,810 3Total Value and number of Prime Contractsawarded by Region 2007-2010
    10. 10. •Region Total Contract value % Contracts % Av. Value No. of subcontracts•Cornwall £1,599,081 1.7% 2 5.3% £799,541 81•East Mids £11,153,981 1.8% 35 28.2% £318,685 38•East £43,254,436 14.6% 27 25.7% £1,602,016 110•Gibraltar £0 0.0% 0 0.0% £0 0•London £61,445,694 11.0% 137 45.8% £448,509 316•Merseyside £5,317,595 4.7% 11 11.3% £483,418 106•NE £3,357,583 1.1% 1 1.2% £3,357,583 71•NW £44,079,605 34.8% 16 14.8% £2,754,975 154•SE £79,034,538 25.0% 14 18.2% £5,645,324 106•SW £16,746,228 14.0% 19 25.0% £881,380 97•S Yorks £2,638,376 3.9% 1 4.3% £2,638,376 87•West Mids £24,193,972 7.6% 18 13.7% £1,344,110 25•Y & Humber £3,093,922 0.7% 1 2.1% £3,093,922 76Eng Total £295,915,010 8.7% 282 23% £1,049,344 1267Value and number of Prime Contract awarded toCSOs by Region 2007-2010
    11. 11. StructuralFunds: What ishappening Economic landscape : recession EU budget & Structural Funds in particular :MORE focussed on driving the EU forward vs globalcompetitors / EU 2020 Concentration of EU investment on top drivers of EUgrowth & delivering UK National Reform Plan More flexibility to align EU funds to increase impact(regional, social, rural and fisheries) Streamlining red tape
    12. 12. EU Common strategicframework investmentthemes1. Innovation and R&D2. ICT: Improving access; quality and usage3. SMEs: Improving competitiveness, incl. in the agricultural andaquaculture sectors4. Shift to low carbon economy5. Climate change adaptation and risk management6. Environmental protection & resource efficiency7. Sustainable transport and unblocking key networks8. Employment and labour mobility9. Social inclusion and fighting poverty10. Education, skills and lifelong learning11. Improving institutional capacity for efficient publicadministration
    13. 13. European Commission’sUK prioritiesStructural Funds• Increasing R&D spend &‘localising’ impact of national investment• Improving access to finance for SMEs• More renewable energy• NEETS; troubled families; ex-offenders; unskilledpeople (including employees of SMEs); self-employment/entrepreneurship• Higher level skills
    14. 14. Local focus :new opportunitiesMore integrated programmes/ geographic flexibility• Community-led local development (all 4 funds)‘Local Action Groups’ able to draw on all 4 Strategic Framework fundsaccording to an integrated plan.• Joint Action Plans (ERDF & ESF only)Lump sum payments to a single beneficiary more than €5m or 10%(current proposals) of an Operational Programme - whichever islower - to manage a group of projects aimed at a specific purpose(but not for major infrastructure)• Integrated Territorial Investments (ERDF & ESF onlyUrban development or Territorial strategy drawing on a multiplicity ofprogramme strands and programmes. Aspects of management canbe delegated to a city or NGO.
    15. 15. Priorities for CSOs Support the Commission’s proposal to ring-fence at least20% of ESF for social inclusion and anti-poverty Direct access to funding for Civil Society through: - A specific Civil Society work stream within ESF - An expanded global grants programme - Simplified access through lump sum payments Ability to utilise volunteer time as an eligible source of in-kind match funding throughout the UK Structural Fundsprogrammes Civil Society country representation on the arrangements forthe UK Partnership Contract (England, Wales, Scotland andNorthern Ireland)
    16. 16. Priorities for CSOs Support for financial instruments (mixed grant/loan funding)for Civil Society Increased promotion of and support for transnationalfunding opportunities Support for community-led local development approaches,community economic regeneration and social innovation Valuing the contribution of the social enterprise sector to jobcreation, including professional skills and personaldevelopment Recognising and valuing Civil Society’s contribution to theenvironmental and sustainability agenda 100% funding for Civil Society Technical Assistance
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