NCVO Annual Conference 2011 The European Union (EU)  and Civil Society: why bother? London, March 1, 2011 Dr. Frank W. Heu...
<ul><li>Civil Society in Europe –  </li></ul><ul><li>European Civil Society </li></ul><ul><li>2.  Code of Good Practice  <...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><li>“ Volunteering is a creator of human and social capital. It i...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society is based on its own logic of action, clearl...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society/Volunteering in Europe shows itself – diffe...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society is more than the sum of voluntary associati...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society Organized civil engagement in comparison Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, Mar...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>But: overall lack of legal frameworks; one in five of the...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Debate on redefining the roles and duties of state/politi...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><li>Workers' Group (Group II) comprises representatives from national...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>CS/NGOs look for additional ways to influence the process...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>The prospects of article 11 of the Lisbon Treaty:  </li><...
Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>4.  Not less than one million citizens who are nationals ...
Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation <ul><li>Principal objective: to contribute to the creation of an enabling en...
Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
Policy Cycle: Steps in the political decision-making process Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Dr. F. W. Heube...
Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation <ul><li>In order to illustrate and clarify the relationship, the matrix belo...
Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Matrix of Civil Particiption Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Thank you very much! Dr. Frank W. Heuberger Board Member for European Affair...
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Frank W. Heuberger: The European Union (EU) and Civil Society: why bother?

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Presentatiob by Dr. Frank W. Heuberger
Board Member for European Affairs,
National Network for Civil Society (BBE), Germany at the NCVO Annual Conference 2011.

The European Union (EU) and Civil Society: why bother? (workshop)

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Frank W. Heuberger: The European Union (EU) and Civil Society: why bother?

  1. 1. NCVO Annual Conference 2011 The European Union (EU) and Civil Society: why bother? London, March 1, 2011 Dr. Frank W. Heuberger Board Member for European Affairs, National Network for Civil Society (BBE), Germany
  2. 2. <ul><li>Civil Society in Europe – </li></ul><ul><li>European Civil Society </li></ul><ul><li>2. Code of Good Practice </li></ul><ul><li>for Civil Partizipation </li></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  3. 3. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><li>“ Volunteering is a creator of human and social capital. It is a pathway to integration and employment, and a key factor for improving social cohesion. It is a central element of European citizenship . Volunteers contribute to shaping European society. And they are a strong expression of solidarity. Volunteers regardless of their income, available time, age, and skills, help to give other people a chance to live their lives better and contribute to bridging the gaps. ” (Viviane Reding, Vice-President of the European Commission) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Civil society/volunteering has a high social meaning: it generates benefits and productivity neither state nor economy can provide; it offers a strong power for social integration; it produces and reproduces social capital, the fundamental value of civil society </li></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  4. 4. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society is based on its own logic of action, clearly distinguished from those of politics and economy: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>- trust based </li></ul><ul><li>- solidarity driven </li></ul><ul><li>- transparent </li></ul><ul><li>- discourse grounded </li></ul><ul><li>- consensus oriented </li></ul><ul><li>- open and access free </li></ul><ul><li>- operating in public sphere </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- expecting participation and codetermination </li></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  5. 5. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society/Volunteering in Europe shows itself – differently specified and developed – in almost all social spheres: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>sports and recreation </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>leisure and social activities </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>culture and music </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>social welfare and services </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>church and religion </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>environment and animal rights </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>professional advocacy </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>politics/political advocacy, parties </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>local civic engagement </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>youth work / (adult) education </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>health sector </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>school/nursery school </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>rescue/voluntary fire services </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>law and crime </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  6. 6. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Civil Society is more than the sum of voluntary associations and NGOs (NGOs often „one issue “ -organizations), it is a social sector </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sector develops self-esteem and self consciousness as public interest lobbyist (but: Civil Society and NGOs not per se political or critical to the government) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>European Year of Volunteering 2011 important: a) it supports the self conciousness of the national Civil Societies, b) it bridges the gap between volunteering and (political) participation >>> active citizenship </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice of Civil Society as „collective subject “ gains in importance; oganized CS sits more often at the table when governments decide on policy of social matters </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  7. 7. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society Organized civil engagement in comparison Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  8. 8. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>But: overall lack of legal frameworks; one in five of the EU Member States do not have clear rules for volunteers and volunteering (insurance, social protection); few have Compacts , formal agreements with governments and local authorities to regulate dialogue and exchange of mutual expectations; Code of good practice for civil participation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some Member States restrict unemployed people or those on early retirement (Denmark, Belgium, Sweden) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>European Civil Society visible only in its beginning; note: 60 – 80% of the legislation in EU Member States is influenced or forestalled by decisions at EU level </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At the same time: crises of national parties and politics of nation states is reflected on the European level; fear: to run politics without citizens (disenchantment with politics) </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  9. 9. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>Debate on redefining the roles and duties of state/politics, economy and civil society </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased importance of Civil Society on international and European level by coping with central social challenges (education, demographic change, social services), governments need civil society more and more </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brussels's link to SC so far: European Economic and Social Committee (EESC), a consultative body that gives representatives of Europe's socio-occupational interest groups, and others, a formal platform to express their points of views on EU issues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Employers' Group (Group I) 114 members, made up of entrepreneurs and representatives of entrepreneur associations working in industry, commerce, services and agriculture </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  10. 10. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><li>Workers' Group (Group II) comprises representatives from national trade unions, confederations and sectoral federations </li></ul><ul><li>Group III's identity a wide range of categories: members are drawn from farmers' organizations, small businesses, the crafts sector, the professions, social economy actors, consumer organizations etc. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Composition of Group III does in no way reflect the reality of CS in the Member States; important NGOs are not represented </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Members of the EESC are not elected but freely chosen by their Member States without any regulations </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  11. 11. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>CS/NGOs look for additional ways to influence the process of decision making in Brussels; enhanced efforts to gain access and influence through European civil society networks (SOLIDAR, CEDAG, Social Platform, CEV, ENNA; INGO) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>With the Lisbon Treaty European Commission breaks new grounds to include and engage national Civil Societies and European citizens in its decision making processes (Civil Dialogue, AGORA, „Europe for Citizens “ , European Citizens Initiative) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Advanced understanding of democracy: enriching representative democracy by implementing direct-democratic elements and multiple possibilities of participation and cooperation (at local, state and European level) >>> participatory democracy </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  12. 12. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>The prospects of article 11 of the Lisbon Treaty: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The institutions shall, by appropriate means, give citizens and representative associations the opportunity to make known and publicly exchange their views in all areas of Union action. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The institutions shall maintain an open, transparent and regular dialogue with representative associations and civil society. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The European Commission shall carry out broad consultations with parties concerned in order to ensure the the Union‘s actions are coherent and transparent. </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  13. 13. Civil Society in Europe – European Civil Society <ul><ul><ul><li>4. Not less than one million citizens who are nationals of a significant number of Member States may take the initiative of inviting the European Commission, within the framework of its powers, to submit any appropriate proposal on matters where citizens consider that a legal act of the Union is required for the purpose of implementing the Treaties. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is now on the national organized CS and their European networks to take these chances seriously and spell out their understanding of what „representative“, „association“, „Civil Society“, „open, transparent and regular dialogue“, „broad consultation“, and „parties concerned“ mean </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>We should bother with the European Union; the EU needs the national and European Civil Society – Civil Society can gain a lot by taking the prospects of the Lisbon Treaty seriously </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  14. 14. Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation <ul><li>Principal objective: to contribute to the creation of an enabling environment for NGOs with a set of general principles, guidelines, tools and mechanisms for civil participation in the political decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><li>To be a relevant and effective tool for NGOs from local to international level in their dialogue with parliament, government and public authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>There are two interconnected dimensions to this process. Firstly levels of participation in the order of increasing intensity, from simple provision of information to consultation, dialogue and finally partnership between NGOs and public authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondly six steps in the political decision-making process from agenda setting through implementation to monitoring and reformulation. </li></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  15. 15. Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  16. 16. Policy Cycle: Steps in the political decision-making process Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  17. 17. Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation <ul><li>In order to illustrate and clarify the relationship, the matrix below visualises the steps of the political decision-making process and their connection with levels of participation. </li></ul><ul><li>At each stage in the decision-making process (from left to right) there are different levels of NGO participation (from bottom to top). It is envisaged that the steps in the political decisionmaking process can be applied to any context in Europe, local to national. </li></ul><ul><li>This matrix may be used in a wide variety of ways, such as mapping the levels of engagement of Civil Society in any given policy process; assessing NGO participation at any particular point of a process; or as a practical resource for NGO planning of policy activities. </li></ul>Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  18. 18. Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Matrix of Civil Particiption Dr. F. W. Heuberger, London, March 1, 2011
  19. 19. Code of Good Practice for Civil Partizipation Thank you very much! Dr. Frank W. Heuberger Board Member for European Affairs Bundesnetzwerk Bürgerschaftliches Engagement (BBE) Michaelkirchstr. 17-18 10179 Berlin/Germany direct line: +49 (0) 611 5895885 Tel: +49 (0)30 62980-110 Fax: +49(0)30 62980-109 [email_address] www.b-b-e.de

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