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Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
Complete Streets
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Complete Streets

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From Focus North Texas event

From Focus North Texas event

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  • 1. Mark G. Goode, III, P.E. Associate and Manager of the Traffic & Transportation Group
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. The crucial factor we are searching for is the suitable speed that the planning and design team should target for a particular section of roadway. New Urbanism, Context Sensitive Solutions and Complete Streets are the disciplines that developers, residents, City staff and stakeholders are demanding in their new projects. DOTs are looking closely at ways to reduce the severity and frequency of accidents. The goal is to reduce the speed differential among automobiles, pedestrians, bicyclists, transit and trucks.
  • 8.
    • Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, RP-036A, (ITE 2010)
    • A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets (AASHTO 2004a)
    • Guide for the Planning, Design and Operation of Pedestrian Facilities (AASHTO 1999)
    • Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (AASHTO 1999)
    • Highway Safety Design and Operations Guide (AASHTO 1997)
    • Roadside Design Guide (AASHTO 2002)
    • Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, Web Briefing; John Daisa & John Norquist; 5/24/2010
  • 9.
    • New Urbanism
    • Traffic Calming
    • Walkable Urban Thoroughfares
    • Sustainable Transportation
    • Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS)
    • Complete Streets
    • Road Diet
  • 10.
    • New Urbanism
    • Traffic Calming
    • Walkable Urban Thoroughfares
    • Sustainable Transportation
    • Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS)
    • Complete Streets
    • Road Diet
  • 11.
    • Accommodating pedestrians, bicycles, transit, freight and motor-vehicles within a fine-grained urban circulation network
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.4.
  • 12.
    • Providing a compact and mixed-use environment of urban buildings, public spaces and landscapes that support walking directly through the built environment
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.4.
  • 13.
    • Achieving system-wide transportation capacity using a high level of multimodal connectivity, serving walkable communities with appropriately spaced and properly sized components rather than by increasing the vehicular capacity of individual thoroughfares
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 4-5.
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16.
    • Creating a supportive relationship between thoroughfares and context by designing thoroughfares that will change as the surroundings vary in urban character
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.5.
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • A mix of land uses in close proximity to one another
    • A mix of density, including relatively compact developments (both residential and commercial)
    • Building entries that front directly onto the sidewalk (w/o parking between the buildings and the public ROW)
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 5.
  • 20.
    • Building, landscape and thoroughfare design that is pedestrian-scale
    • Thoroughfares designed to serve the activities generated by the adjacent context in terms of the mobility, safety, access and place-making functions of the public ROW
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.5.
  • 21.
    • A highly connected, multimodal circulation network, usually with a fine “grain” created by relatively small blocks providing safe, continuous and balanced multimodal facilities
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 5.
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.
    • Pedestrian Places Vehicle Intolerant
    • Pedestrian Supportive Vehicle Tolerant
    • Pedestrian Tolerant Vehicle Supportive
    • Pedestrian Intolerant Vehicle Places
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 5. Adapted from a system for describing “degrees of walkability” for street environments, Charlier Associates.
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.
    • CSS involve stakeholders in considering a transportation facility in its entire social, environmental and aesthetic context
    • Under Complete Streets, basic accommodations for bicyclists, pedestrians, transit users and disabled travelers are necessities rather than optional items
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 16.
  • 35.
    • Public and Stakeholder Involvement
      • Adjacent Property Owners & Developers
      • The Neighborhoods & HOAs
      • City Departments (e.g., Traffic, Planning, Public Works, Storm Water Management, Law Enforcement, EMS, Economic Development)
      • Bicyclists, ADA and other users
      • Transit
      • Utilities
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 15.
  • 36.
    • Vision and Goals
    • Definition of Needs
    • Development of Alternatives
    • Alternatives Evaluation
    • Development of a Transportation Plan
    • Transportation Improvement Plan
    • Project Development and Implementation
    • Operation and Maintenance
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 16.
  • 37.
    • Design Vehicle (Bus, WB50, WB67)
    • Vehicle performance
    • Driver performance
    • Traffic characteristics
    • Capacity and vehicular Level of Service (LOS)
    • Access controls and management
    • Pedestrians and bicycles
    • Safety
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 107.
  • 38.
    • Target Speed (Design encourages posted speed)
    • Location (Urban Context Zones)
      • Suburban
      • General Urban
      • Urban Center
      • Urban Core
    • Design Vehicle and Control Vehicle
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 108
  • 39.
    • Functional Classification
      • Principal Arterial
      • Minor Arterial
      • Collector
      • Local
    • Thoroughfare Types
      • Boulevard
      • Avenue
      • Street
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p. 108.
  • 40. Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.53.
  • 41.  
  • 42. 17,800 vpd 35 mph
  • 43.  
  • 44. 35 mph 17,800 vpd 11,000 vpd 2,500 vpd
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47. 13,000 vpd 30 mph
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50. 30 mph 16,000 vpd 11,300 vpd
  • 51.  
  • 52.  
  • 53. 30 mph 19,500 vpd 8,600 vpd 27,500 vpd
  • 54.  
  • 55.  
  • 56.
    • Appropriate Speed (25-35 mph) vs. Higher Speeds
    • Narrower lanes (10’) vs. wider lanes
    • Capacity & LOS balanced against all users
    • Minimal curb offsets 0’vs. 2’-3’
    • On-street parking (parallel or angle)
    • Bike lanes (5’)
    • Speed Management Techniques
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, pp. 107-114.
  • 57.
    • Active Measures
      • Roundabouts
      • Road diets
      • Lateral shifts or narrowing
      • Smaller curb-return radii
      • On-street parking
      • Speed humps, speed tables, speed platforms
      • Narrowed travel lanes
      • Raised crosswalks
      • Speed actuated traffic signals
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.112.
  • 58.  
  • 59.  
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62.  
  • 63.  
  • 64.  
  • 65.
    • Passive Measures
      • Synchronized signals
      • Radar trailers/speed feedback signs
      • Visually narrowing road using pavement markers
      • Visually enclosing street with buildings, landscaping and street trees
      • Speed enforcement corridors
      • Flashing beacons on intersection approaches
      • Speed limit markings on pavement
      • Mountable cobblestone medians or flush concrete bands
      • Shared lanes (bicycle) using signs and pavement markings
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.112.
  • 66.  
  • 67.  
  • 68.  
  • 69.  
  • 70.  
  • 71.  
  • 72.
    • 85th percentile speed
    • Based on reasonable driver expectations
    • Setting signal timing for moderate progressive speeds
    • Using narrower lanes that cause motorists to naturally slow their speeds
    • Using physical measures such as curb extensions and medians to narrow the traveled way
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.108.
  • 73.
    • Using design elements such as on-street parking to create side friction
    • Minimal or no horizontal offset between the inside travel lane and median curbs
    • Eliminating super elevation
    • Eliminating shoulders in urban applications, except bicycle lanes
    • Smaller curb-return radii at intersections and elimination of high speed channelized right-turns
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.109.
  • 74.
    • Paving materials with texture detectable by drivers as notification of possible presence of pedestrians
    • Proper use of speed limit, warning, advisory signs and other appropriate devices to gradually transition speeds when approaching and traveling through a walkable area
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.109.
  • 75.
    • CSS for the urban environment involves creating a safe roadway environment in which the driver is encouraged by the roadway’s features and surrounding area to operate at lower speeds
    Source: Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, p.109.
  • 76. The crucial factor we are searching for in creating the Complete Street is the suitable speed that the planning and design team should target for a particular section of roadway. The goal is to reduce the speed differential among automobiles, pedestrians, bicyclists, transit and trucks.
  • 77.  
  • 78.
    • Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, RP-036A, (ITE 2010)
    • A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets (AASHTO 2004a)
    • Guide for the Planning, Design and Operation of Pedestrian Facilities (AASHTO 1999)
    • Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (AASHTO 1999)
    • Highway Safety Design and Operations Guide (AASHTO 1997)
    • Roadside Design Guide (AASHTO 2002)
    • Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, Web Briefing; John Daisa & John Norquist; 5/24/2010

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