Consumer Reactions to the Sexual Health Guide
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Consumer Reactions to the Sexual Health Guide

on

  • 99 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
99
Views on SlideShare
99
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Consumer Reactions to the Sexual Health Guide Consumer Reactions to the Sexual Health Guide Presentation Transcript

  • It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. Consumer Reactions To The Sexual Health Guide Take Charge of Your Sexual Health: What you need to know about preventive services Conducted by: Michaels Opinion Research, Inc. August 2013
  • Overview • 22 men and women ages 20–39 in a series of 10 small group interview sessions in Ft. Lauderdale, August 22–23 – 4 sessions with heterosexual women – 4 sessions with heterosexual men – 2 sessions with MSM • Participants given 15 minutes to read a draft of the Guide: – Underline information that stands out, is new or surprising – Put a question mark (?) next to information not clear or confusing • Then . . .write down 3-5 top takeaways It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Initial Reactions • Initial, unprompted comments indicate objectives—educating and motivating consumers about preventive sexual health services—were strongly achieved. Participants were: – Motivated to think about getting STI tested and vaccinated – Prompted to think about tests/vaccines they have received – Informed about (and questioning) guidelines for: • HPV vaccine • Screening recommendations for other STIs that vary based on age, sex or sexual orientation – Intrigued by the use of the term “STIs” • Not familiar with it, but transition from STDs easily adopted • Seen as “not so negative” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Initial Reactions, continued • Most men and women said their providers never talk with them about sexual health care services or tests – “If you don’t bring it up, they won’t do so. I can barely get them to listen to me about acid reflux.” • Many of the women assumed their providers “must have done all the tests” during gynecological exams – “ A pap smear is for everything. To check that all is good down there.” – “When I get my Pap test, there were a whole bunch of q-tips. They must be testing me for lots of things.” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Initial Impressions of Men – That men should be tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syp hilis – Tested for HIV – You can talk to someone at your university about sex – HPV vaccinations are recommended for males up to age 26. I thought it was only recommended for females and didn’t know the age recommendation – Hepatitis B vaccinations were only given routinely to infants after 1991 – There are a variety of free STI testing options for me – Am I at risk? – Sexual health – Safe sex – That it’s better for homosexual men to get tested more than heterosexual men – That there’s more outreach programs than I thought – That it’s important to ask about the patient privacy act when sharing info – Sexual health is a commitment – Regular sexual health screening is smart and healthy – Why is the age for women different than for men – Men who have sex with men – Men who have sex only with women – STI – Preventive care – Good health – HPV vaccine— bummed, I’m ineligible – Liked the paragraphs that stress the importance of dialogue about STIs (even if it’s uncomfortable) – Interested in more about what to do if there is a diagnosis of STI or STD or HIV It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Initial Impressions of Women – Children as young as 13 should be tested – Many sites to go on for prevention and contraception – Intimate Partner Violence – Outlined the type of sexual check based on partner – Preventative measures – immunization – Speaking to health care provider about sexual health – HPV screening – Once a year HIV test – HPV vaccine on kids 11-12 – Women over 30 get vaccines/checked even if with one partner for gonorrhea and syphilis – Violent sex—get help from your health provider – Reduction in frequency for Paps recommended – Age of vaccine for HPV – Risk factors vary depending on gender preference for partner – Pap smear every three years – No contraception for men – STI vs. STD – I must get tested for chlamydia – Get more informed on hepatitis B – Partner has to test with me – STI – Diabetic women are at risk for Hep B vaccine – Gay or bi-men need to be tested every 3-6 months – Gay women can transmit HPV, gonorrhea, chlamydi a It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Perceptions of the Guide’s Goals and Objectives • A few thought the Guide was for adolescents or teens on the verge of or who have just become sexually active • Most others thought the intended audience and goals were much broader: – “There’s no agenda. It is to educate everyone” – “It is increasing awareness of services” – “It was not screaming ‘Don’t have sex.’ It was educating” – “It provided a sense of comfort and assurance. To own these things in your life” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Content of Strongest Interest • Men most interested in: – Recommended Preventive Sexual Health Services for Men (#1) – Preventive Sexual Health Services (#2) – What Is Sexual Health and How Do I Achieve It? (#3) • Women most interested in – Recommended Preventive Sexual Health Services for Women (#1) – Talking With Your Health Care Provider About Sexual Health (#2) – What to Look For in a Health Care Provider (#3) It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • What Is Sexual Health and How Do I Achieve It? • Both men and women responded very favorably to the opening page of What is Sexual Health and How Do I Achieve It? • They agreed the five action steps outlined were essential for good sexual health • They liked that this section recognized the emotional benefits and challenges of sexual relationships or interactions – “It made me feel good. . .good about my choices” – “[It’s saying] get to know yourself first, what you want before you have sex with someone” – “These are practical and reasonable steps. It will get people thinking ” – “It’s relevant at my age” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Recommended Preventive Sexual Health Services Section • Considered most important section of the Guide . . . but prompted questions for more information: – Why is the HPV vaccine recommended for 11 and 12 year olds? – Why can it be given up to age 26? – And why not after age 26 except to “some” women? – Is there a difference between “screening” and “testing”? – What are the health consequences of not being tested for each of the recommended tests? – What does EC mean? (They assume the “morning after” pill, but were not sure) – Why is the Hepatitis B vaccine given to only “high-risk” adults born before 1991? – Why is Hepatitis C screening recommended for all men born between 1945 and 1965, but only to at risk men born after 1965? It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Recommended Preventive Sexual Health Services Section • Intimate partner violence: – It’s a very important and relevant topic – But strong agreement that providers “never” ask about “partner violence” – Think partner violence issues best addressed with therapists, counselors and mental health professionals • Counseling/Contraception: – Include a statement about abstinence as an option • Men who have sex with men/Men who have sex only with women: – They liked having recommendations tailored • Women who have sex with women: – They preferred the men’s version since it’s included in main text It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Understanding “At Risk” • They were frank about their sexual experiences and understood the risks of unprotected sex • They paid close attention to the definition of “at risk” in the Guide • MSM aware of risks to MSM—they’re getting tested twice or more a year for STIs and HIV It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • How Can I Talk With My Health Care Provider About Sexual Health? • Potential questions to ask providers about sexual health issues considered useful – “I liked this section because it shows you how to start the conversation” • They suggested additional question areas: – Testing: What was I tested for? Was I tested for syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia? Can I see a list of the tests I am getting? What’s included in an STD screen? How will the results be given to me? – Privacy: What test results are you required to report and to whom? – Partner issues: How do I tell a partner I have HIV? – Performance: I’m having trouble reaching a climax—could it be a physical problem? – Costs: Where can I get free or low cost services? What if I don’t have insurance? Where can I get affordable contraceptives? It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Resources • Overall positive reactions to the list of resources presented • They like web addresses because searching the Internet is the typical way they seek information and answers for health concerns • They suggested adding sources for low cost or free services and more about HPV It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • Impressions of the Guide Title • Reactions were unanimous for Take Charge of Your Sexual Health: what you need to know about preventive services • Many used the word “empowering” to describe the Take Charge title – “It makes you take control, take charge, be informed about what’s going on” – “It’s your responsibility, it’s up to you” – “You are the boss of your own body” – “It’s about personal ownership, take charge” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.
  • The Net Takeaway • They think it’s time to normalize sexual health screenings: – “It's best to normalize testing and check it all. Make it routine.” – "Just make it one more part of the check up. Just like cholesterol. I have no problem with that.” • They strongly embrace advancing the concept of sexual health care, especially men: – “It’s good to talk about sexual health” – “It’s not discussed, not even on talk shows” – “Great to put this on the agenda” – “Making sexual health normal would be revolutionary for our society” It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time. It’s about honesty. It’s about knowledge. It’s about time.