Research Brief: Chilhood-Cancer Survivors and Comparison Peers
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Research Brief: Chilhood-Cancer Survivors and Comparison Peers

on

  • 467 views

In this longitudinal study, researchers used standardized measures and multiple informants to examine differences in externalizing behavior and substance use among childhood cancer survivors and ...

In this longitudinal study, researchers used standardized measures and multiple informants to examine differences in externalizing behavior and substance use among childhood cancer survivors and comparison peers during adolescence. The roles of peer acceptance, social behavior and medical factors were of focus.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
467
Views on SlideShare
467
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Research Brief: Chilhood-Cancer Survivors and Comparison Peers Research Brief: Chilhood-Cancer Survivors and Comparison Peers Document Transcript

  • Survivors of Childhood Cancer and Comparison Peers: The Influence of Peer Factors on Later Externalizing Behavior in Emerging Adulthood *Research published in 2009 Journal of Pediatric Psychology Introduction • The study was organized in three phases: The five-year survival rate for childhood cancer is reported o Phase 1 was a classroom study where peer relationships to exceed 75 percent, and among young adults, an estimated data was obtained and potential comparison peers were 1 in 640 are survivors of childhood cancer. Although these identified; children survived cancer, they are not immune to the later effects often caused by cancer or its treatment, such as organ o Phase 2 consisted of home visits with the participating damage, functional impairment, secondary malignancies and children with cancer and comparison peers during the lower overall quality of life. summer following the classroom assessment; Adolescence is a time of change, often accompanied by o Phase 3 included a follow-up home visit soon after the testing boundaries, such as breaking rules and experimenting child turned 18. with substance use. Prior research has reported conflicting outcomes on whether childhood cancer survivors are more • Phase 1 consisted of 100 families in the school assessment prone to externalizing behavior and substance use. In this for both the experimental and comparison groups. For the longitudinal study, researchers used standardized measures comparison sample, each peer was matched by race, and multiple informants to examine differences in external- gender and age from the class roster. The measures used izing behavior and substance use among childhood cancer were Peer Acceptance Ratings, Best Friend Nominations survivors and comparison peers during adolescence. The and Revised Class Play. roles of peer acceptance, social behavior and medical factors • Phase 2 was comprised of 95 subjects in the initial home were of focus. visit, with 98 in the comparison group. Measures used Key Findings from Study included a demographic questionnaire, Child Behavior • Cancer survivors and peers exhibited similar externalizing Checklist and Treatment Severity. behaviors and substance use at follow-up. However, • Phase 3 included subjects who had turned 18 (n=56 cancer survivors were less likely to use marijuana. survivors and n=60 comparison peers). Data from • Substance use was associated with earlier peer acceptance available parents was also collected. The average time and social behavior in both groups. between assessments was 5.9 years. Follow-up assessment measures were a demographic questionnaire, the Child • Unlike previous research, peer acceptance and social Behavior Checklist, Antisocial Behavior Checklist, a drink- behavior did not predict later externalizing behavior. ing and drug history and ratings of severity of late effects. • Survivors who were older at diagnosis were at greater For more information, please contact the Center for risk for later externalizing behavior and substance use. Biobehavioral Health in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital at 614-722-3182 Research Method www.NationwideChildrens.org/Research • Research subjects initially were identified through a cancer registry at a large children’s hospital. Eligibility * Thompson, AL, Gerhardt, CA, Miller, KS, Vannatta, K, & Noll, RB. Survivors of childhood cancer and comparison peers: The influence of peer factors on later externalizing requirements included: 8- to 15-years-old, on treatment behavior in emerging adulthood. J Pediatr Psychol, 2009. for cancer not primarily involving the central nervous system, in school without full-time special education, PMID: 19324936 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez living within 50 miles of the hospital, and English speaking. 3474