Allison Friedman: DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort
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Allison Friedman: DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort

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A presentation on DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort by Allison Friedman, MS, Health Communications Specialist, Division of STD Prevention, CDC

A presentation on DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort by Allison Friedman, MS, Health Communications Specialist, Division of STD Prevention, CDC

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Allison Friedman: DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort Allison Friedman: DSTDP's Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort Presentation Transcript

  • DSTDP’s Infertility Prevention Social Marketing Effort Allison Friedman, MS Health Communication Specialist CDC UPDATE
  • Project Background & Status
    • Purpose: Develop and implement a campaign to promote chlamydia (CT) screening among sexually active African American, Caucasian & Hispanic females, ages 15-25 years.
    • Project Activities
    • Literature Review (2007)  
    • Exploratory Research (2007-2008)
      • Phone interviews (n=80)
      • In-person interviews (n=45)
    • Concept & Message Testing (Nov-Dec ‘09)
      • 18 Focus Groups in 4 cities
    • Product testing (early 2010)
      • Mall intercept interviews (N= 200)
      • Online surveys (N=500)
    • Campaign Implementation (2010)
  • Exploratory Research: Summary of Findings
    • Very few were knowledgeable about CT; most were unaware of:
      • CT’s asymptomatic nature, potential to cause infertility
      • Recommendation for routine CT testing
      • Urine test for CT
    • Perceived Barriers & Benefits to Screening
    Barriers Benefits
    • Fear (testing, positive results, parents finding out)
    • Knowing one’s STD status
    • Privacy concerns; peer stigma
    • Ability to take action if positive
    • Access
    • Confirm neg. status (reassurance)
    • Embarrassment
    • Being responsible
    • Lack of symptoms/perceived susceptibility
    • Lack of awareness
  • Concept and Message Development: Strategic Approach
    • Based on exploratory research findings, and guided by theoretical frameworks (Health Belief Model & Theory of Planned Behavior)
    • Three concepts designed to:
      • 1. Diminish identified barriers:
        • Overcome stigma
        • Emphasize ease of testing
      • 2. Empower women
      • 3. Emphasize women’s health and infertility, in relation to broader aspirations
    • Messages also designed to:
    • Increase perceived susceptibility to, severity of CT
    • Increase perceived benefits, self-efficacy re. CT testing
    • Reframe perceived ‘norm’ (i.e., normalize testing)
    • Provide cues to action
  • Concept & Message Testing Focus Groups
    • Segmented by age, race/ethnicity, and school/work status (adults).
    • Exploring:
    • Approaches (concept, tone) that resonate with, and motivate audiences
    • Framing/language (“STD” vs. “Chlamydia”)
    • Dissemination preferences (source, channel, products)
    • Testing:
    • 6 posters (3 concepts)
    • Information (print content)
    • Video PSAs (existing/past campaigns)
    • Logos (existing campaigns & new)
  • Overcoming Stigma
  • Ease of Testing
  • Women’s Health & Infertility
  • Empowerment
  • Logos
  • (Very) Preliminary Top-Level Findings
    • Leading concepts normalize testing & emphasize fertility (aspirations)
      • Infertility = important motivator across age segments
      • Peer stigma = less of a concern for older segments
    • Audiences want:
      • Scary statistics w/easy solution (to prompt action)
      • Direct/upfront messages about STD testing
      • Real-life stories of women like them (age, race/ethnicity); diversity also good.
    • Humor attracts attention, but message must be thought-provoking to prompt further action
    • Mixed reactions re:
      • STD vs. CT messaging
      • Female-targeted vs. male and female targeted
  • Campaign Implementation (2010)
    • National implementation:
      • Primarily online
      • Possibly through magazines, among other channels
    • Campaign messages may be extended through national media & other partners
      • MTV/Kaiser Family Foundation
      • NCC??
    • 2-3 select pilot sites:
      • Heightened media & social marketing efforts at local level