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"Old Dartmouth Roots Symposium", New Bedford Whaling Museum, Sept., 23, 2011.

"Old Dartmouth Roots Symposium", New Bedford Whaling Museum, Sept., 23, 2011.

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"The Grinnells & Howlands", presentation by James Grinnell "The Grinnells & Howlands", presentation by James Grinnell Presentation Transcript

  • GRINNELL, HOWLAND, & HMS RESOLUTE A New Bedford Whaling Museum Volunteer Project Dedicated to Peter S. Grinnell, a founder of WHALE and NBWM benefactor (slide 678).Gift of Helen Grinnell King NBWM #2011.3.21 Gift of Helen Grinnell King NBWM #2011.3.1 Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell Captain Cornelius Grinnell 1765-1837 1758-1850 The Arctic ship “RESOLUTE’’ 1857 Published by Royal Collection Trust / © HM Queen Elizabeth II 2012 Acquired by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert c. 1857 “The RESOLUTE became trapped in ice in 1852 and remained stuck until rescued by an American whaler in 1855. She was towed back to New London, Connecticut, where she was refitted and eventually handed back to Britain as part of a diplomatic gesture [advocated by Henry Grinnell]. Queen Victoria received the ship on 16 December 1856.” Creator: Meade Brothers (Charles Richard Meade 1826-1858) and Henry WM Meade (1823-1865) http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2932765/the-arctic-ship-resolute-new-york 1
  • Includes: Elisha Kent Kane, Capt. C. F. Hall, Queen Victoria, William Bradford, Albert Bierstadt, Hetty Green, Henry Huttleston Rogers, the FLYING CLOUD, the CHARLES W. MORGAN, & the WANDERER Table of Contents Chapter I. Henry Grinnell & the HMS RESOLUTE – slide 4 Chapter II. William Bradford, Albert Bierstadt, & the Grinnells – slide 121 Chapter III. Tall Ships, Bradford’s Fairhaven, & Henry H. Rogers – slide 216 Chapter IV. Scrimshaw: Gifts from Weston Howland & Family – slide 304 Chapter V. Grinnell & Howland Old Dartmouth Roots – slide 404 Chapter VI. The FLYING CLOUD & the Yachtsmen – slide 504 Chapter VII. Homes of Old Dartmouth Relatives – slide 567 Chapter VIII. CHARLES W. MORGAN, Colonel Green, & Historic Preservation – slide 621 Chapter IX. Pacific Northwest Descendants & Addenda – slide 679 AcknowledgementsFrom the Whaling Museum, I thank: Trustee Chair John Garfield, President James Russell, Curators MichaelLapides & Michael Dyer, Librarians Laura Pereira & Mark Procknik, Robert Rocha, Arthur Motta, BrianWitkowski, Melanie Correia, Sarah Budlong, and Sarah Mink. For William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas, Ithank Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler; for The New Bedford Yacht Club, I thank Trustee Llewellyn HowlandIII; and for Greetings From Dartmouth, Massachusetts, I thank Curator Judith Lund and Beverly Glennon. I alsothank Paul Cyr & Janice Hodson at the New Bedford Free Public Library, Debbie Charpentier & CarolynLongworth at the Millicent Library, and Jay Avila & Joseph Thomas at Spinner Publications. For their inspirationand love of Old Dartmouth, I thank former Mayor John Bullard (1st WHALE Agent/Director), Prof. Toby Dills,James Lopes, Esq., Seth Mendell, Don Cuddy, Rev. Robert Thayer, Peggi Medeiros, and many other people. Forthe use of their books, I thank Dr. Stuart Frank for Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in theNew Bedford Whaling Museum; Marsha McCabe & Joseph Thomas for Not Just Anywhere; Barbara Fortin forColonel Edward Howland Robinson Green and the World he Created at Round Hill; J. Parkinson, Jr. for TheHistory of the New York Yacht Club; Russell A. Potter for Arctic Spectacles, Ken McGoogan for Lady Franklin’sRevenge & Race to the Polar Sea; R. E. Train for The Bowdoin Family, H. Wahlberg for Reflections on a River; H.L. Satterlee for J. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait, J. K. Wright for Geography in the Making: The AmericanGeographical Society 1851-1951, the Grinnell Family Association and E.W. Grinnell for Matthew Grenelle’sDescendants, William M. Emery, Zephaniah Pease, Daniel Ricketson, and many others. My objective has been toshare my love of Old Dartmouth and its artists, architecture, sailing ships, and Whaling Museum. The writer is aretired educator and amateur history “buff” with no formal training or experience in research or genealogy; and this Ancestry of the Grinnell Family: Wm. Emery, 1931 (Note: French Ancestry is not accurate.)digital history has been an independent, volunteer project which has not been professionally vetted or reviewed. 2
  • PrefaceThis digital family history has its roots in the 2011 New BedfordWhaling Museum’s Old Dartmouth Roots Symposium (below),and it is limited primarily to descendants and close relatives ofCornelius and Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell. At first, it may seemodd to include some non-related famous people from OldDartmouth. However, some of these people were neighbors andsome were close relatives like Hetty Green, the only child of AbbyHowland (slide 206, etc.). Henry Huttleston Rogers’ best man andbrother-in-law was a Cornelius Grinnell, who is buried next toWilliam Bradford (slides 178 & 263). Bradford was a next doorneighbor to Capt. Joshua Grinnell in Fairhaven (slide 186), andBradford and Albert Bierstadt had adjoining studios in New York(slide 190). Bierstadt grew up in New Bedford and had a mansionnext door to Moses Grinnell on the Hudson River (slide 209+),and Henry Grinnell was world renowned in the mid 1800’s for hisArctic Expeditions. The first chapter is devoted to Henry and hiscontributions that were posthumously honored by Queen Victoriawith a desk make out of the remains of the H.M.S. RESOLUTE.Much of the material in this family history has been included asbackground for the Museum’s future Evolution of an AmericanPort City project, the July 2014 visit of the CHARLES W. MORGAN,and the 2013 Arctic Visions exhibit. The Whaling Museum wasoriginally named the Old Dartmouth Historical Society. http://www.whalingmuseum.org/explore/exhibitions/upcoming/arctic-visions Curator: Michael Lapides http://www.whalingmuseum.org/programs/past-programs/old-dartmouth-roots-2011 http://www.whalingmuseum.org/explore/exhibitions/upcoming/Symposium sponsored by ECHO (Education through Cultural and Historical Organizations) commerce-industry-evolution-american-port-city a program administered by the U.S. Dept. of Education. Concept, Text, Research, & Design Copyright © 2013 by James B. Grinnell, Jr. All Rights Given to the New Bedford Whaling Museum FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY 3
  • DARTMOUTH TOWNSHIP Originally included Westport, Dartmouth, New Bedford, Fairhaven, & Acushnet. Tiverton & Little Compton, R.I. were include until 1746. RHODE ISLAND MASSACHUSETTS ACUSHNET BRISTOL NEW MATTAPOISETT BEDFORD FAIRHAVEN PORTSMOUTH WESTPORT DARTMOUTH TIVERTON Mass. & R.I. JAMESTOWN Wm. Bradford’s Home MIDDLETOWN on New Bedford Harbor NEWPORT Oak Grove LITTLE Cemetery COMPTON Mass. & R.I Howland Homestead at Round HillSylvia (Howland) Grinnell and four preceding generations of Howlands were born at Round Hill Farm, Dartmouth Bristol County Map (H.F. Walling & O.W. Gray, Boston, 1871)(slides 405 & 567+). Capt. Cornelius, Sylvia, Joseph, Cornelia, Lawrence, Frederick, Russell, & 40+ other Grinnells are buried in Oak Grove Cemetery. 4
  • Chapter I. Henry Grinnell & the HMS RESOLUTE Gift of Mrs. Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1983.58.2 Gift of Mrs. Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1983.58.1 Philanthropist Henry Grinnell QUEEN VICTORIA’S GIFT Born in New Bedford February 18, 1799 NBWM’s Grinnell RESOLUTE Desk “Author/Advocate/Sponsor”: Grinnell Arctic Expeditions 1850-55 Given by Queen Victoria to Sarah (Minturn) Grinnell in “Principal Subscriber”: Isaac I. Hayes 1860 Expedition** gratitude for her husband Henry’s “…great exertions…in theAdvocate/Sponsor/Treasurer: Capt. C. F. Hall Arctic Expeditions (3) search to ascertain the fate of Captain Sir John Franklin.” Founding President: American Geographical Society Henry “exerted” over $5 million & countless hours, 1850-1856. **New York Times, Dec. 18, 1881 (slide 80). This desk represents his two decades of leadership in arctic exploration. 5
  • Henry Grinnell: “FATHER OF AMERICAN ARCTIC DISCOVERY”* 1799-1874 Son of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell Henry Howland was a brother of Pilgrim John Howland and Henry Grinnell’s great, great, great, great grandfather. Henry Howland came over from England around 1622 and settled in Duxbury. In 1656, the The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, pg. 249 Pilgrims disenfranchised him for holding Quaker meetings, and he purchased land in Dartmouth.Created at 182 Regent St., London NBWM #1983.58.3.6 Hetty Green was also a direct descendant of Henry Howland. Her mother, Abigail Howland was a first cousin of Henry’s mother, Sylvia Howland. According to family mythology, Henry Grinnell and Hetty Green were named after Henry Howland. Henry Howland plaque is in the Water St. entrance to the Wattles Family Gallery, NBWM *Capt. C. F. Hall in Geography in the Making: The American Geographical Society 1851-1951: by John K. Wright, 1952, pg. 57 (slide 748) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Francis_Hall http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell 6
  • Presidents’ RESOLUTE Deskttp://www.ierehousemuseum.org/furnishings/resolute-desk.htm “JFK, Jr. peeking out of FDRs panel in the RESOLUTE desk in 1962” Life - Stanley Tretick Oval Office, circa 1996 7
  • PRESIDENTS’ DESK made from the RESOLUTE Library of Congress - Frances Benjamin Johnston“Secretary of State John Hay signs a peace treaty with Spain at the RESOLUTE desk in President McKinleys office, circa 1899.” 8
  • Whaling Museum’s GRINNELL DESK made from the RESOLUTEBadly tarnished Grinnell Desk plaque in process of restoration. Nearly identical inscriptions on the two RESOLUTE Desk plaques. Grinnell RESOLUTE Desk NBWM #1983.58.1_v1sm American Geographical Society President Henry Grinnell “The Constitution of the newly formed American Geographical Society was adopted at a public meeting held in John Disturnells Geographical and Statistical Library, 179 Broadway, New York, on October 9, 1851. Henry Grinnell, eight officers, and an Executive Committee of eight were duly elected.” (slides 745+) The U. S. Grinnell Expedition: by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, U.S.N., 1854 (slide 28) www.amergeog.org//1851.htm “…in 1850, at his own expense [Henry] fitted out an expedition to search for Sir John Franklin…” (Howland Heirs, Emery). The U. S. Grinnell Expedition of 1850-1851 was the first American arctic expedition (slide 28). The Second Grinnell Expedition was in 1853-1855 (slide 42), and Henry Grinnell assisted in the financing, promotion, and management of four other U.S arctic expeditions through 1870. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklins_lost_expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Franklin 9
  • Henry Grinnell’s fortune originated in New Bedford whaling and his father’s rise to first mate, captain, ship owner, & bank director. NBWM #Mss 2, S-g 3, Series A, Vol 1 William Rotch, Jr. to: “Capt. Cornelius Grinnell master of the Ship Bedford” December 4, 1795Henry was the third son of Cornelius Grinnell and Sylvia Howland. Capt. Cornelius was born in Little Compton on Feb. 11,1758 and died in New Bedford on April 19, 1850 (slides 423 & 501+). He was a poor boy who came to New Bedford to servean apprenticeship as a hatter (slide 425). William Rotch, Jr. came from a prominent whaling family that had transferred theirwhaling business from Nantucket and founded the New Bedford whaling industry. Cornelius was only a private during theRevolution. The fact that he was not promoted beyond that rank, indicates that not only was he poor but he had no political orsocial connections. By 1785, he had worked his way up to first mate of the most celebrated ship in New Bedford at that time,the REBECCA. In the above letter, William Rotch, Jr. wrote: “I hope I shall find a conveyance for a few more casks of oil –Capt. Cornelius Grinnell master of the Ship BEDFORD of this Port being bound to New York to seek a freight if he should notsucceed will probably want to load his Ship with lumber, in which case I have given him liberty to draw upon you for a fewthousand Dollars on my account, should he draw you will oblige me by paying his drafts & informing me thereof.” 10
  • Abolitionist William Rotch, Jr., c. 1845 Cameo: gift of Mrs. Peter S. GrinnellIn addition to being a prominent businessman, William Rotch, Jr.was a well-known abolitionist (slide 428). His family wereQuakers who brought their whaling business from Nantucket toNew Bedford. During the 1820’s (?), he became a Unitarian likemany of New Bedford’s Quakers. As a businessman, he was abanker and the owner of many ships including the BEDFORD, thefirst ship to fly the Stars & Stripes in England after theRevolutionary War. Capt. Cornelius was an owner of 16+ shipswith his sons and Howland relatives. They owned the shipEUPHRATES from its launching in 1809 until it was sunk by thenefarious Confederate Gunboat SHENANDOAH in 1865 (slides 517& 513). William Rotch, Jr. & Capt. Cornelius were businessassociates for decades. They died in the same week in 1850, wereboth over 90 years old and shared an obituary in The New BedfordMercury (slide 501). They were buried near each other in the“Unitarian section” of Oak Grove Cemetery (slides 501 & 502).Capt. Cornelius was visited by former President John QuincyAdams on Sept. 28, 1843 while he was visiting his eldest son,Congressman Joseph Grinnell (slide 476). Thus, the poor armyprivate lived to be accepted at the top level of society. MosesGrinnell, who became the president of the family shippingcompany (Fish, Grinnell & Co. and Grinnell Minturn, & Co.)worked in the Rotch Counting House before he went to New Yorkand developed the family business into an international companyof very high repute in the China Trade and in a strictly scheduledpacket service to London and Liverpool from New York. NBWM #1984.21.3 11
  • William R. Rotch & Co. to Fish & Grinnell, NY: Feb. 17, 1819William R. Rotch & Co. Letter Book: 1818-1837 NBWM: Mss 2, s-g 7, Series 1, s-s 1, Folder 1 The fortune that Henry Grinnell spent on 20+ years of Arctic exploration was made in the firm of Fish, Grinnell & Co. (became Grinnell, Minturn & Co.). Unfortunately, few records of these companies have survived. On Dec. 7, 1885, The New York Times ran a lengthy article on Capt. Preserved Fish, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell’s long-time partner and friend. This article included the following about the origin of Fish & Grinnell: “He [Capt. Fish] quit the sea in 1810, settled down in New-Bedford, formed a partnership with Cornelius Grinnell and under the firm name of Fish & Grinnell carried on a money-making business as shipping merchants.” Other sources state that Fish & Grinnell was founded in 1815 by Preserved Fish and Joseph Grinnell, son of Capt. Cornelius. In Jan. 1826, Henry and brother Moses became partners along with older brother Joseph and the name was changed to Fish, Grinnell & Co. William R. Rotch was a son of William Rotch, Jr. Hand-copying letters in books is how business records were saved before carbon paper was invented. In addition to 70+ ships registered in New Bedford, it has been estimated that the Grinnells owned/managed over 50 ships registered in New York including the Donald McKay built packet ship CORNELIUS GRINNELL and famous clipper ship FLYING CLOUD (see chapter VI). This letter book contains copies of letters that William R. Rotch & Co. wrote to Fish & Grinnell on the following dates: 2/27/1819, 4/16/1819, 5/3/1819, 6/25/1819, 7/3/1819, 8/4/1819, 8/30/1819, 9/21/1819, 11/1/1819, 1/26/1820, 2/24/1820, 3/13/1820, 3/18/1820, 4/11/1820, 6/28/1820, 8/7/1820, 8/16/1820, 8/27/1820, 9/18/1820, 9/27/1820, 11/4/1820, 2/14/1821, 2/26/1821, 4/14/1821, 5/22/1821, 6/18/1821, 8/25/1821, 9/22/1821, 10/2/1821 (2), 10/21821 (2), 2/4/1822, 2/23/1822, 3/4//1822, 6/18/1822, 7/8/1822, 10/4/1823, 10/11/1823, 10/21/1823, 11/23/1823, 11/28/1823, 12/13/1823, 4/17/1824, 5/11/1824, 5/28/1824, 6/1/1824, 10/16/1824, 10/20/1824 (2), 11/20/1824, 12/24/1824, 2/19/1825, 3/8/1825, 7/14/1825 (2), 7/25/1825, 8/26/1825, 10/25/1825 (3), 12/1/1825, 12/8/1825, 1/17/1826, 1/24/1826 (2), 1/28/1826, 2/15/1826, 3/15/1826, 3/18/1826, 3/23/1826, 4/10/1826, 4/13/1826, 4/15/1826 (2), 4/24/1826, 7/29/1826, 8/10/1826, 9/6/1826, 9/23/1826, 9/29/1826, 10/9/1826, 10/18/1826, 12/13/1826, 2/26/1827 (4), 4/18/1827, 4/20/1827, 4/23/1827, 5/11/1827, 5/22/1827, and 6/11/1827. As indicated, multiple letters were sent on some dates. 12
  • William R. Rotch & Co. to Henry Grinnell: Sept. 22, 1821 NBWM: Mss 2, s-g 7, Series 1, s-s 1, Folder 1The above letter marks the beginning of Henry’s career that lead to his partnership in Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Henry wasborn on Feb. 18, 1799, he was just twenty-two years old and a “commission merchant” in New York shipping & sellingwhale oil for one of the most famous whaling families of New Bedford. Henry’s brothers Cornelius, Jr. and Joseph hadpreceded him into the New York shipping trade; and their father, Capt. Cornelius, had begun his career as a ship owner andmerchant in the late 1700’s. Grinnell, Minturn’s roots date back to the ships owned by the Grinnell & Howlands in the early1800’s (slide 446+). Even though he retired from his partnership around the time the FLYING CLOUD was built, Henrycontinued as an investor/member. He spent most of his fortune and the rest of his life promoting and funding Arcticexploration. The Wm. T. Russell mentioned in the above letter was married to Henry’s sister Sylvia, and they lived at 66Bedford St. (slide 606) about half a block from the County St. homes of Cornelius, Jr. and Joseph Grinnell (slides 458 &460). On the following dates William R. Rotch & Co. wrote letters directly to Henry Grinnell: 9/22/1821, 12/4/1821,3/4/1822, 1/29/1823, 10/27/1823, 11/6/23, 4/17/1824, 5/8/1824, 10/4/1824, 10/28/1824, 10/30/1824, 11/13/1824, 2/26/1825,& 5/14/1825. In January 1826, Fish & Grinnell became Fish, Grinnell & Co. and William R. Rotch & Co. ceased sendingletters directly to Henry, and he and younger brother Moses became partners in Fish, Grinnell & Co. with brother Joseph. 13
  • NBWM: Mss 2, s-g 7, Series 1, s-s 1, Folder 1 William R. Rotch & Co. to Fish & Grinnell, 1825In the mid 1820’s Fish & Grinnell became Fish, Grinnell & Co. when Henry and younger brother Moses became partners.Joseph and Capt. Preserved Fish retired and Robert Minturn, Henry’s brother-in-law, became a partner. The name was officiallychanged to Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in 1833. During his “retirement”, Joseph was a congressman, president of the Marine Bank,president of the New Bedford & Taunton Railroad, and president of Wamsutta Mills from 1847 to 1885 (slide 500, etc.). 14
  • Right: first letter from William R. Rotch & Co. to Fish, Grinnell & Co. January 17, 1826(Henry & Moses added as partners.) Fish & Grinnell Incorporation and Name Changes NBWM: Mss 2, s-g 7, Series 1, s-s 1, Folder 1Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Right: first letter from William R. Rotch & Co. to Grinnell, Minturn & Co. October 10, 1837 (Name changed in 1833.) 15
  • Grinnell Brothers’ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnellhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell ships registered in Connecticut in addition to the 100+ ships in Massachusetts & New York that they owned/managed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell Mystic Seaport George W. Blunt Library The next slide shows that Joseph Grinnell was also an owner of the GEORGE WASHINGTON, which had been built for him (& others) in New Bedford in 1832. As will be shown, Joseph had been a founder of Grinnell, Minturn (originally named Fish & Grinnell) along with their father, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell and uncle, Capt. Preserved Fish. Joseph’s brother, Cornelius, Jr., was also a founder. Cornelius, Jr. suffered a tragic death in 1830 (slide 419). Younger brothers William P. & James M. Grinnell also owned several ships. HENRY GRINNELL: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuPeople.cfm?PersonId=11431 MOSES GRINNELL: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuPeople.cfm?PersonId=11430 JOSEPH GRINNELL: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuPeople.cfm?PersonId=19461 16
  • Sample of Grinnell, Minturn & Co. ships registered in Connecticut Ship GEORGE WASHINGTON: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuVessel.cfm?VesselId=104200 Ship WILLIAM C. NYE: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuVessel.cfm?VesselId=112098 Ship CLEMATIS: http://library.mysticseaport.org/initiative/CuVessel.cfm?VesselId=101673 17
  • Creator: Montardier, 1828 Given “In Memory of LLEWELLYN HOWLAND” by Llewellyn Howland, Jr. NBWM #1979.3.3 Ship EUPHRATES Sunk by Confederate Steamer SHENANDOAH on June 23, 1865 Owned by Grinnells & Howlands 1809 to 1865 Owned by Cornelius Grinnell 1809-1850 Owned by Henry Grinnell 1842-1862 18
  • Ship EUPHRATES Joseph Grinnell was the surveyor when this ship was built in 1809. He was just 21, and his success at this important position resulted in his uncle, Capt. John Howland, taking him to New York in 1810 and making him a junior partner in several ships. Through the ownership and management of many ships like the EUPHRATES, Joseph, his father, three of his brothers and many of his relatives became very wealthy men. This wealth enabled Henry to become a major contributor to six Arctic expeditions, and most of the Howland owners on the left were Henry’s uncles or cousins. In fact, the EUPHRATES was owned by the extended Grinnell-Howland family from the time it was built in 1809 until it was burned by the Confederate raider SHENANDOAH on June 22, 1865. Even after the nefarious Captain Waddell of the SHENANDOAH learned on June 23, 1865 that the Civil War had ended, he captured or sank twenty-one additional Union vessels (slide 517). Capt. Cornelius Grinnell was an owner of the EUPHRATES from 1809 until he died in 1850; and his friend, in-law, and partner (Capt. Preserved Fish) was an owner from 1809 to 1815. In addition to many New York ships, Henry Grinnell owned the following New Bedford ships: SARAH (#2829), BRIGHTON (#330), CORNELIA (#664), GEORGE WASHINGTON (#1226), & EUPHRATES (#979). Henry Grinnell became an owner of the EUPHRATES in 1842 and remained an owner until it was sunk in 1865 (left). The Grinnells & Howlands were owners of this ship and many others in New Bedford and New York. The EUPHRATES was one of the 59 New Bedford ships owned by Capt. Cornelius Grinnell and his offspring. One source states that they also owned or leased at least 55 ships in New York.Ship Registers of New Bedford NBWM Research Library 19
  • ONEIDA “Chinese School of Painting” NBWM #1994.53 Owned by Joseph Grinnell (Henry’s brother) & others. Sunk by Confederates on April 24, 1863.New Bedford Ship Registers Error: ONEIDA was sunk by the FLORIDA, not by Capt. Sommes and the ALABAMA NBWM Batchelder File 20
  • FLYING CLOUDTo Messrs Grinnell, Minturn & Co. This Print of their Splendid CLIPPER SHIP “FLYING CLOUD”. Lithograph by: N. CurrierHenry Grinnell was a founding partner of Grinnell, Minturn & Co.; and he was a member until 1864. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Cloud_(clipper) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grinnell,_Minturn_%26_Co 21
  • NBWM #1983.58.3.5 NBWM #1983.58.3.11Henry Grinnell was a partner inGrinnell, Minturn & Co., owners of Sarah (Minturn) Grinnell, Henry’sthe China Clipper FLYING CLOUD. wife, was a sister of Robert Minturn,(slides 21 & 504+). On his a partner in Grinnell, Minturn & Co.mother’s side (Howland), Henry (slide 6). On their mother’s sidecame from five generations of (Bowne), the Minturn’s came fromMassachusetts Quakers (Chapter V). generations of New York Quakers. Old Dartmouth Historical Society, 1940 22
  • New Bedford in China Trade by Capt. William L. Hawes, 1940 Old Dartmouth Historical SocietyIncluding the ONEIDA & the FLYING CLOUD Henry Grinnell 23
  • **** ** ** ****** Henry Grinnell Father of U.S. Arctic Exploration*** *** 1850-1870 *** Henry was the sponsor, CEO, treasurer, *** & principal contributor to below expeditions. *** *** *U. S. Grinnell Expedition: 1850-1851 *** **Second Grinnell (Kane) Expedition: 1853-55 *** ***Capt. C. F. Hall Expeditions: 1860-1869 ****Hall Polaris Expedition: 1870-1871 Henry was an advocate/sponsor/contributor only. *****William Bradford’s Art Expedition: 1869 SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, 1879 (slides 95+) Henry’s advice & support were likely but Expeditions marked in red were sponsored/backed by Henry Grinnell. have not been documented. 24
  • “Letter from Lady Franklin to Mr. Grinnell” New York Times, Oct. 2, 1851 http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/franklin-lady-jane-2065 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklins_lost_expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Franklinhttp://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9D05E6DD1431E13BBC4A53DFB667838A649FDE&scp=1&sq=grinnell+lady+franklin&st=p http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Franklin 25
  • U. S. Grinnell Expedition, 1851 New York Times November 6, 1851 Part IHenry’s obituary in the July 2, 1874New York Times (slide 111) began asfollows: “By the death of HenryGrinnell, geographical science losesone of its warmest friends, and itsmost enthusiastic advocate andsupporter. The first President of theAmerican geographical Society, theoriginator of the first expedition insearch of Franklin, Henry Grinnell hasalways placed his energies and hispurse at the service of the science towhich he may be said to have been to‘the manner born’ – Arcticnavigation… Although avoiding asmuch as possible any publicity, Mr.Grinnell would spend any amount ofmoney, time, and trouble in advancingthe interests of those who were,socially, his inferiors – especiallysailors…”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kanehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnellhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklins_lost_expeditionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Franklin http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9E03E2DD153EE13AA15756C0A9679D946092D7CF 26
  • U. S. Grinnell Expedition, 1851 New York Times November 6, 1851 Part IIThe following statement is also fromHenry’s obituary in The N.Y. Times(slide 111): “From 1819 to 1849 Mr.Grinnell remained in partnershipwith his brothers. They [Fish &Grinnell and Grinnell, Minturn &Co.] were for many years the largestshippers and consignees of whaleoil, their principal depots being atNew Bedford, New London, andSag Harbor.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kanehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9E03E2DD153EE13AA15756C0A9679D946092D7CF&scp=5&sq=grinnell+expedition&st=p 27
  • THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, U.S.N. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Grinnell_Expedition 28
  • Historical Society of Pennsylvania http://digitallibrary.hsp.org/index.php/Detail/Object/Show/object_id/2137 USS ADVANCE Owned by Henry Grinnell & loaned/given to the U. S. Navy 1850-1855 (Destroyed in the Arctic) “The first USS ADVANCE was a brigantine in the United States Navy which participated in an arctic rescue expedition. Advance was built in 1847 as Augusta and loaned to the Navy on 7 May 1850 by Mr. Grinnell to participate in the search for Sir John Franklins arctic expedition which had been stranded in the frozen north since 1847. After last-minute preparations, the ship, under the command of Lieutenant Edwin J. DeHaven and in company with RESCUE, put to sea from New York on 23 May 1850.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Advance_(1847) 29
  • USS RESCUE “The first USS RESCUE was a brig in service with the U. S. Navy. The brigs RESCUE and ADVANCE specially reinforced and fitted out for Arctic service, were offered on loan to the U.S. Government by Henry Grinnell in 1850 for use in a rescue mission tracing the ill-fated expedition which, in May 1845, had sailed from England under Sir John Franklin in search of a northwest passage. Two years later the Admiralty dispatched relief expeditions. Since there was still no news of the expedition by 1 May 1850, the U. S. Congress authorized the president to accept Mr. Grinnells offer. In accordance with the wishes of both Congress and Mr. Grinnell, both ships were manned by volunteers from the U.S. Navy.” (Destroyed in the Arctic) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Rescue_(1850) Creator: James Hamilton Seneca Falls Historical Society “The RESCUE in Her Arctic Dry Dock”USS RESCUE: owned by Henry Grinnell & given to the U. S. Navy 1850-1851 http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/hamilton_james.html http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=9888 30
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELL Dr. Kane’s “The ‘Rescue’ nipped in Melville Bay, August 1850” “Drawn by J. Hamilton from a Sketch by Dr. E.K. Kane, U.S.N.” THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 31
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELL Dr. Kane’s “Grounded Berg near Cape York” “Drawn by J. Hamilton from a Sketch by Dr. E.K. Kane, U.S.N.” THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 32
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELL Dr. Kane’s “Entering Lancaster Sound” The USS ADVANCE and the USS RESCUE Drawn by J. Hamilton after a sketch by Dr. E .K. Kane, USN THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 33
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELLJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kane Dr. Kane’s “ICE-BERG IN MOTION, JULY 29, 1850: Melville Bay” THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 34
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELLJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kane Dr. Kane’s “ARCTIC GLACIER, MELVILLE BAY” The USS ADVANCE and the USS RESCUE THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 35
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELLJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, U.S.N. Dr. Kane’s “Beechy Island, Franklin’s first Winter Quarters” http://www.ric.edu/faculty/rpotter/gravesimage.html http://www.yachtfiona.com/northwestpassage2009/newsletter1.html 36
  • U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1850-51: Edwin J. De Haven, Commander Official U. S. Navy Expedition funded by Henry Grinnell, the “author/advocate/sponsor”. HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/FIRST_GRINNELL_EXPEDITION HTTP://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/HENRY_GRINNELLJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kane Dr. Kane’s “FISKENAES FROM THE GOVERNOR’S HOUSE” SOUTH GREENLAND THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. 37
  • THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N.Grinnell, Minturn & Co. ran ships from New York to Liverpool and London and had offices in those cities. Henry and his brothers frequently traveled toEngland on business, and Henry’s son Cornelius lived there. Capt. Cornelius had spent his younger years in the merchant service on the North Atlanticrun and had visited England and France on business. This long association with England might be why Henry took such an interest in the Lost FranklinExpedition and Arctic exploration. Since Henry was a very private person who avoided speaking to reporters and attending functions honoring him, hisinterest does not seem to have been driven by personal aggrandizement. Regardless of his motivation, Henry Grinnell had the experience, knowledge,connections, wealth, and generosity to be the leading sponsor/patron of U. S. Arctic Exploration for twenty years. The first Grinnell Expedition left theBrooklyn Navy Yard on May 22, 1850. http://archive.org/details/usgrinnellexped00kanegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Grinnell_Expedition 38
  • THE U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN: by Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., U.S.N. Arctic Explorations, Vol. I http://archive.org/details/usgrinnellexped00kanegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Grinnell_Expedition by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 Both Lieutenant De Haven, commander of the first Grinnell Expedition, and Dr. Kane, commander of the second Grinnell Expedition, were officers in the U. S. Navy. The two Grinnell Expeditions were officially supported by Congress and included a contingent of U. S. Navy personnel. Undoubtedly, this was the result of lobbying by Henry and his brothers Moses and Joseph, who were both U. S. Congressmen. Moses was a New York Congressman from 1839-1841 and Joseph a New Bedford Congressman from 1843-1851. 39
  • USS DE HAVEN (DD727)“Navy Photo 2128-47, broadside view of USS De Haven (DD 727) off Mare Island on 5 Nov 1947. Shewas in overhaul at the yard from 10 Sep to 18 Nov 1947.” Image from the USS DeHaven Association.”http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/0572726.jpg http://destroyerhistory.org/fletcherclass/ns_dehaven/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_De_Haven 40
  • Edwin Jesse De Haven Commander U. S. GRINNELL EXPEDITION“Edwin Jesse DeHaven, born in 1819 in Pennsylvania wasappointed Acting Midshipman at the age of 10 and PassedMidshipman 5 years later. He served in Vincennes, flagship ofthe Wilkes Exploring Expedition in its historic cruise of 1838to 1842 to the Antarctic and among the Pacific Islands. DeHaven served in the Mexican War, assisting in the capture ofthe Mexican schooner Creole. In command of the GrinnellExpedition in 1850, he led the search for Sir John Franklinlost in the Arctic. Only traces of the party were found, but DeHaven discovered and named Grinnell Land, and wascommended for the valuable scientific data he collectedconcerning the winds and currents of the ocean. He served inthe Coast Survey Service until placed on the retired list inFebruary 1862. He died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1 May 1865. Nimitz Library United States Naval Academy http://www.usna.edu/Library/sca/findingaids/dehaven/index.html 41
  • Arctic Explorations, Vol. I: by Elisha K. Kane, MD, 1856http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kane 42
  • Dr. Kane promoted to Commander SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION Assist. Surgeon Elisha Kent Kane, USN U. S. Grinnell Expedition, 1850-1852 Commander Elisha Kent Kane, M.D. Second Grinnell Expedition, 1853-1855 http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-k/ek-kane.htmU.S. Naval Academy Museum Collection, Annapolis 43
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION “Kane expedition” funded by Henry Grinnell 1853-1855 Including the mythical “Open Polar Sea” and Kane’s discovery of the Great Humboldt Glacier Humboldt GlacierArctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati02kanegoog 44
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCreator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://www.upenn.edu/gazette/0308/PG0308_feature1.pdf Commander Kane’s “CROSSING THE ICE BELT AT COFFEE GORGE” Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 92+ 45
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnellhttp://ia600700.us.archive.org/27/items/arcticexploratio02kane/arcticexploratio02kane.pdf http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.3/ Expedition Commander Kane’s “The look-out from Cape George Russell” Engraving proof courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, England (slide 124). Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 102+ 46
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane Commander Kane’s “MIDNIGHT IN SEPTEMBER” USS ADVANCE USS ADVANCE owned by Henry Grinnell & loaned to the U. S. Navy 1850-1854. Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 140+ 47
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnellhttp://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.4/ James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane Commander Kane’s “THE PACK OFF SYLVIA HEADLANDS” (USS ADVANCE) Henry Grinnell’s mother and daughter were named Sylvia. Engraving proof courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (slide 124). Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 180+ 48
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellJames Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.6/ Commander Kane’s “THE OPEN WATER FROM CAPE JEFFERSON” [Open Polar Sea] Engraving proof courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (slide 124). Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 306+ 49
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell Commander Kane’s “BEAR HUNT” Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 336+ 50
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell Commander Kane’s “LIFE IN THE BRIG, SECOND WINTER” Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 442+ http://www.upenn.edu/gazette/0308/PG0308_feature1.pdf 51
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellArctic Exploration, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati02kanegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition “The Great Glacier of Humboldt” 52
  • Photographer: Matthew Brady Library of Congress: LC-USZ62-110168 http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati06kanegoog Arctic Explorations, Vol. II: by Elisha K. Kane, U.S.N., 1856 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition 53
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCreator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.7/ Commander Kane’s Kane’s “ICEBERGS NEAR KOSOAK” Engraving proof courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (slide 124). Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 56 54
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCreator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://www.upenn.edu/gazette/0308/PG0308_feature1.pdf (Elisha Kent Kane) Commander Kane discovers the “Great Glacier of Humboldt” Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 152+ 55
  • Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati06kanegoog 56
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell The NBWM has a copy of this volume with notes by William Bradford regarding Kane’s descriptions & illustrations (slide 125).Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati06kanegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition 57
  • from back of book Prof. Agassiz offers a “scientific review” of Dr. Kane’s Arctic ExplorationsTo most scientists, the discovery of the Humboldt Glacier (Great Glacier) was far more significant than discovering the remains of theFranklin Expedition. The Humboldt Glacier confirmed Agassiz’s theories of the ice age and glaciation. Dr. Kane studied geology and civilengineering at the University of Virginia under William Barton Rodgers (1st president of MIT) before he graduated the University ofPennsylvania medical school. Unfortunately, Kane was never given the credit he deserved for the Humboldt Glacier discovery. Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati06kanegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition 58
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell Left: Kane’s “TENNYSON’S MONUMENT” Arctic Explorations, Vol. I, pg. 224 Proofs courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute (slide 124). http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.5/ http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.1/Creator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane 59
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCommander Kane’s “THE ESCAPE OFF WEARY MEN’S NEST” Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 60
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell Commander Kane’s “The Broken Floes Nearing Pikantlik” Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 236 61
  • http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/pga.04114/“Second Grinnell Expedition” at the Library of Congress Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-pga-04114 (digital file from original print) LC-USZ62-40359 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA 62
  • Dr. Kane at the New York Historical SocietyArtist: Peter Reniers, 1857 New York Historical Society Artist: Thomas Hicks, 1858 New York Historical Society Elisha Kent Kane, M. D., U.S.N. (1820-1857) “Dr. Kane, famous Arctic explorer, was born in Philadelphia to John Kintzing Kane and Jane Duval (Leiper) Kane. His world travels began with his assignments to medical missions in China and in Africa. He served in the Mexican War in which he was wounded and contracted typhus, but by 1850 he had returned to duty with an expedition sent to the Arctic to search for a missing British explorer. The story of this journey is told in The U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin (1853).” http://www.nyhistory.org/node/44187 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklins_lost_expedition http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=3998 63
  • http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9D07E5D81438E334BC4153DFB1668388649FDE http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9A04E0DF1238EE3BBC4051DFBF66838F649FDE 64
  • “Henry Grinnell… father of the Kane expedition.” Daniel Ricketson “The Second Grinnell Expedition” in search of Franklin was popularly known as the Kane expedition. The History of New Bedford, Daniel Ricketson, 1858, pg. 141 ***************************************************************************************************** The Lost Franklin Expedition Library and Archives Canada http://kenmcgoogan.blogspot.com/p/home.htmlSIR JOHN FRANKLINWaterloo Place, London http://www.martechpolar.com/Lost%20Expedition/Lost%20Expedition.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklins_lost_expedition 65
  • The Illustrated London News, December 27, 1856 Refitted HMS RESOLUTE Returns to England in 1856 In 1856, Henry Grinnell was instrumental in having the recently salvaged HMS RESOLUTE restored at the expense of the United States government, and returned to Great Britain as a goodwill gesture.” [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell] This chapter is primarily about Henry Grinnell and how he made a fortune in the his family’s shipping firm and attained a world-renowned reputation in Arctic exploration. 66
  • “a large silver vase which British Government presented to Mr. Henry Grinnell [in 1855-56]” Given after the HMS RESOLUTE was returned to England. NBWM Collection 67
  • Philanthropist Henry Grinnell Lady Franklin’s Revenge, by Ken McGoogan, p. 349Arctic scholar Ken McGoogan wrote that Henry Grinnell hadspent over $5 million searching for Franklin by 1856. Afterbeing forced by financial reversals to curtail his expendituresand stop donating ships, Henry was the treasurer for the HayesExpedition and sponsor/treasurer of the three Hall expeditions. http://www.harpercollins.ca/author/sites/kenmcgoogan/rttps.html Henry Grinnell U. S Naval Lyceum Honorary Member April 1, 1854 Henry http://www.usna.edu/Museum/history.htm This honorary Lyceum membership was a high honor that the U. S. Navy bestowed on civilians in 1854. Today, this Lyceum is housed at the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis. NBWM Research Library 68
  • http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9B01E4D71039E134BC4B53DFB766838C649FDE 69
  • Henry Grinnell Founder & President American Geographical and Statistical SocietyAccording to an article about his funeral in The New York Times (July 4, 1874), Henry “…had been for many years President,Vice President, and member of the Executive Committee of the American Geographical Society.” As can be seen above, hewas a vice president in 1857; and his brother Moses and sons Cornelius & William were also members at that time. Moses wasalso a contributor to several Arctic expeditions. Much more on American Geographical Society on slides 745+. Michigan Historical Reprint Series, Univ. of Michigan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Grinnell 70
  • Additional Grinnell Expedition Art at the University of Cambridge, England “…pencil sketches and one watercolour of Arctic scenes. They may be by E. K. Kane during one of the Grinnell Franklin Search expeditions. Courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute (slide 124) http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.9.1// http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.9.3/“CAPE GRINNELL” 71
  • “THE DEATH OF DR. KANE” Creator: Mathew Brady, National Archives and Records Administration http://www.ric.edu/faculty/rpotter/kanedeath.htmlBelow: New York Times Articles on the Grinnell Expeditionshttp://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9805E7D8153DE334BC4E52DFB667838E649FDE&scp=2&sq=grinnell+exedition&pst=phttp://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9E03E2DD153EE13AA15756C0A9679D946092D7CFhttp://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9B01E4D71039E134BC4B53DFB766838C649FDE 72
  • Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, pg. 299“The death of ‘Dr. Kane of the Arctic Seas’ caused perhaps a greater publicoutpouring of grief than that of any other figure between Washington and Lincoln.After his death in Havana, where he had gone in a fruitless effort to recover his health,Dr. Kanes remains were transported by boat to the mainland, where they progressedby steam-train and boat throughout the heart of the United States, before arriving inPhiladelphia for the final obsequies. At every train station and dock where his casketpassed, it was met by crowds of civic dignitaries, wearing black as well as speciallymade badges and armbands. Pictures of Dr. Kane, draped with black crepe, appearedin every store-window, and flags flew at half-mast from town halls and statehouses.” (quotation from Prof. Russell A. Potter) http://www.ric.edu/faculty/rpotter/kanedeath.html The Ice Finders, by Edmund B. Bolles, pages 210 & 211 http://ebbolles.com/IceFinders/Reviews.html 73
  • Creator” De Witt Clinton Baxter http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/hh/17/hh17g.htm http://www.librarycompany.org/laurelhill/image/10-16.jpg“The Dead Watch” Remains of Dr. Kane Lying in State, Independence Hall, Philadelphia 74
  • USS Kane (Destroyer # 235), 1920-1946“USS Kane was named in honor of Assistant Surgeon Elisha Kent Kane USN, (1820-1857), who gained fame as an Arctic explorer during the 1850s.” DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD -- U.S. NAVY SHIPS http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-k/dd235.htm http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-k/ek-kane.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Kane_(DD-235) 75
  • USNS Elisha Kent Kane (T-AGS-27) Genoa, Italy, 27 May 1987“The second Kane (T-AGS-27) was launched 20 November 1965 by the Christy Corp., Sturgeon Bay, Wis. assigned to MSTS; and placed in service 26 May 1967 for scientific operations under the Atlantic.” http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/10/09102703.jpg 76
  • http://www.usstampgallery.com/view.php?id=8393e8e13cf2a84516f7146cc2f58dbc8f771a3bDr. Kane graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1842. On September 14, 1843, he became Assistant Surgeon in theNavy. He served in the China Commercial Treaty mission under Caleb Cushing, in the Africa Squadron, and in the United States Marin Corpsduring the Mexican American War. Kane was appointed senior medical officer of the U.S. Grinnell Expedition of 1850-1851 under thecommand of Lieutenant Edwin de Haven, which searched unsuccessfully for the lost expedition of Sir John Frankin. The crew discoveredFranklin’s first winter camp [and returned to New York in 1851]. Kane then organized and headed the Second Grinnell Expedition which sailedfrom New York on May 31, 1853… Dr. Kane received medals from Congress, the Royal Geographic Society, and the Societe de Geographie…” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisha_Kent_Kane 77
  • Brothers Henry & Moses: Backers of 1860 Hayes Expedition Henry was first president of The Geographical and Statistical Society and contributor to the Hayes Expedition. Dr. Isaac Hayes Photo: J. W. Black NBWM #1985.24 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Israel_HayesDr. Hayes began his Arctic career on the Second Grinnell Expedition. “Undeterred by the extreme hardships he had endured as ships surgeon on ElishaKent Kanes Second Grinnell Expedition in 1853-55, Dr. Isaac Israel Hayes could not resist the lure of further Arctic exploration. He was a firm believer inthe Open Polar Sea. Following his return from the second Grinnell expedition, Hayes had raised money by lecturing and succeeded in finding a number ofvolunteers for his proposed expedition to the Open Polar Sea. In 1860, he took his tiny schooner, the UNITED STATES, to the north… He wrote in hisjournal ‘All the evidence showed that I stood upon the shores of the Open Polar Sea’. He convinced himself without definite proof that this was indeed thecase. Not only was Hayes subsequently proven wrong, but it was also learned that many of his measurements and calculations were erroneous. Some evenaccused him of falsifying his data. His land trip had covered 1300 miles, but he had achieved essentially nothing.” by Dr. Ralph A. Meyerson.http://www.ekkane.org/Biographies/BioHayes.htm Reference: http://www.amergeog.org/archives/1851.htm http://www.nytimes.com/1860/03/23/news/new-arctic-expedition-dr-haryes-proposed-exploration-polar-sea-meeting.html?scp=70&sq=grinnell%20arctic&st=p&pagewante 78
  • Henry Grinnell: Hayes Expedition treasurer and principal subscriber. 79
  • Henry Grinnell “principal subscriber” 1860 Hayes Expeditionhttp://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9403E2DE163DE533A2575BC1A9649D94609FD7CF 80
  • Grinnell Brothers: Partners & Friends Moses Grinnell to Abraham Lincoln http://www.nytimes.com/1860/03/20/news/a-new-york-merchant.htm (Partial Article) The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=mal&fileName=mal1/309/3099700/malpage.db&recNum=0 81
  • Library of Congress, Abraham Lincoln, and Moses H. Grinnell Lincoln at Moses Grinnell’s Home “When President Lincoln came to Washington, he was invited to, and did, breakfast with Moses at his house in New York.” http://www.mrlincolnandnewyork.org/inside.asp?ID=46&subjectID=3 Moses, Henry, and Joseph Grinnell were Republicans and strong supporters of Lincoln. The Library of Congress has 38 items regarding Moses, 72 regarding Joseph, and 95 regarding Henry. It also has 6 items related to their niece, Cornelia Grinnell Willis, who paid for the freedom of Abolitionist Harriet Jacobs (slides 168-172, 483-493, & 671+). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnellhttp://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/h?ammem/scsmbib:@field(DOCID+@lit(scsm000609)) 82
  • November 5, 1864 http://www.nytimes.com/1864/11/05/news/mass-meeting-merchants -bankers-monied-men-city-declare-for-lincoln-great.htmlCongressman Moses H. Grinnell (NY) was the fifth son of Capt. Cornelius andSylvia Grinnell, and he was born in New Bedford on March 23, 1803 (slide508). He was president of Grinnell, Minturn & Co. for most of his career anddeveloped it into a leading world-wide shipping firm. Even though hepermanently moved to New York in 1825, he owned a pew at the New BedfordUnitarian Church and a home in New Bedford. One source states that Moseshelped fund the Grinnell Arctic Expeditions, and Joseph probably helped, too. The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 250 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 83
  • Article to Right Capt. C. F. Hall to Henry Grinnell, 1860 (Partial Article)http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=F20D17FC3E54157493C3AA1789D95F4C8685F9 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Francis_Hall 84
  • “Donations to the Hall Franklin Expedition 1860” Henry Grinnell Treasurer/Sponsor Hall Expeditions 1860-1871 Henry Grinnell Letters 1860-1871 G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport “The collection is limited to an 11 year period, primarily to the years 1860-1871 and the Charles F. Hall polar expedition. Included are letters to Grinnell from C. F. Hall in New London, Connecticut, and Washington, D.C., regarding Arctic exploration and Halls work in obtaining a Congressional appropriation for an expedition. Included also is a list of donations to the Hall Franklin expedition of 1860.” Other documents state that Moses Grinnell was a donor to Capt. Hall, too. Third on the list, Cyrus Field, had a mansion in Irvington, N.Y. along with Moses, Albert Bierstadt, Washington Irving, Jay Gould, and other notables (slides 209+). Field was a financier and one of the founders of the American Telegraph Co. (AT&T, today). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrus_West_Field “Halls motives for his first voyage—Arctic Study—Limited resources— Reasons for believing that some of Franklins men still lived… Generous aid by Mr. Grinnell” American Explorations in the Ice Zones. by Prof. J. E. Nourse, 1884, pg. 8 http://www.archive.org/details/americanexplorat00nourialahttp://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/coll/coll008.cfm 85
  • Capt. Hall to Henry Grinnell on North Pole Expedition: Feb. 2, 1870 Re: Meeting with President Grant at White House Henry Grinnell Letters 1860-1871: G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=1&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=2http:// library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=2&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=2 http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=3&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=2 86
  • Capt. Hall to Henry Grinnell on North Pole Expedition: July 6, 1870 Henry Grinnell Letters 1860-1871: G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=2&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=3 http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=3&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=3 87
  • Capt. C. F. Hall to Henry Grinnell on North Pole Expedition: Nov. 9, 1870 Re: Meeting with President Grant at Executive Mansion Dinner with Gen. J. H. Martindale & David Field in N.Y. Henry Grinnell Letters 1860-1871: G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=19&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=3 http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/CPageImage.cfm?PageNum=20&BibID=34256&Box=1&Folder=3 88
  • Capt. Charles F. Hall & Henry Grinnell “Charles Francis Hall, apparently inspired by Kanes adventures, became convinced that some of Franklins men might still be alive. Even McClintocks news, brought home in 1859, did not dissuade him. Remarkably, he too found a friend in Henry Grinnell, and through him secured passage on a northbound whaling ship in 1860.” by Prof. Russell Potterhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Francis_Hall Arctic Researches and Life Among the Esquimaux by Capt. C. F. Hall, pg. xviii 89
  • Grinnell Glacier Frobisher Bay, Canada(Not Grinnell Glacier, Montana, whichwas named after George Bird Grinnell.) Arctic Researches and Life Among the Esquimaux by C. F. Hall, pg. 118 90
  • “Mr. Grinnell’s Memorial supported by Clay, Seward, and Pearce in the Senate” “Grinnell and De Haven Expedition of C. F. Hall, 1860-1862 Generous Aid by Mr. Grinnell” American Explorations in The Ice Zones by J. E. Nourse, p. 8 91
  • “Henry Grinnell’s Memorial” (copy of Henry’s Memorial on slide 95)American Explorations in The Ice Zones by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N. http://www.archive.org/details/americanexplorat00nouriala 92
  • Henry Clay presents Henry Grinnell’s Memorial to CongressAmerican Explorations in The Ice Zones by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N. http://www.archive.org/details/americanexplorat00nouriala 93
  • Memorial of Henry Grinnell, presented by Henry Clay, 1852NBWM #B83-4, Folder 3 94
  • Second Arctic Expedition made by Capt. Charles F. Hall, 1864-1869 Henry Grinnell: Hall’s Patron, Advocate, & Treasurerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Francis_Hall SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] 95
  • Second Arctic Expedition Made by Capt. Charles F. Hall, 1864-1869 Henry Grinnell: Hall’s Patron, Advocate, & Treasurer SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] 96
  • Lady Franklin Letter to Henry Grinnell: Oct. 30, 1869SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/franklin-lady-jane-2065 97
  • Lady Franklin Letter to Henry Grinnell: Oct. 30, 1869SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Franklin 98
  • Capt. C. F. Hall to Henry Grinnell: December 14, 1869 Benefits derived from Arctic Exploration by Capt. S. Osborne to Royal Geographic Society SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, pg. xxxvi 99
  • Capt. Osborne to Royal Geographic Society (cont.) Henry Grinnell to American Geographical Society: “…extension of commerce and trade which have flowed from Arctic researches…” including several new whale fisheries. SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 More on Henry & American Geographical Society @ slide 745+ 100
  • Capt. C. F. Hall returns to New Bedford aboard the ANSELL GIBBS: September 26, 1869 SECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] 101
  • Capt. C. F. Hall telegraphs Henry Grinnell from New Bedford: September 26, 1869 Capt. Charles F. HallSECOND ARCTIC EXPEDITION MADE BY CHARLES F. HALL by Prof. J. E. Nourse, U.S.N., 1879 [Internet Archives] http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=5018 102
  • pg. 25 http://archive.org/details/cu31924029881012 “Mr. Henry Grinnell, the well-known philanthropist” http://archive.org/details/cu31924029881012 pg. 627 http://archive.org/details/cu31924029881012http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=5018 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Francis_Hall 103
  • U.S.S. Polaris Captain C. F. Hall, Commander Henry Grinnell was Hall’s Patron & TreasurerNarrative of the North Polar Expedition by Rear-Admiral C. H. Davis, U.S.N., 1876 104
  • Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto http://images.rom.on.ca/public/index.php?function=image&action=detail&sid=&ccid= “The POLARIS, Far North” by William Bradford, 1882 Under command of Capt. C. F. Hall, “The USS POLARIS sailed from New York in 1871 in search of the North Pole. Stuck in ice in Smith Sound in October 1872, 19 crew members and Inuit guides abandoned ship, the remaining 14 following suit later.” Bradford’s above 1882 rendition of the POLARIS is a copy of the engraving in Narrative of the North Polar Expedition by Rear-Admiral C. H. Davis, U.S.N., 1876 (previous slide). Henry Grinnell was Capt. Hall’s patron/backer beginning in 1860, and Henry advocated for Hall to get this ship. 105
  • Mystic Seaport #1939.1244 http://www.mysticseaport.org/imagestorage/m113/m113229-r.jpgBark GEORGE HENRY of New London, ConnecticutDate: May 28, 1860 (date depicted). Description: Engraving of bark GEORGE HENRY (bu. 1841, Waldoboro, ME; lost in Hudson Bay1863; Capt. James M. Buddington, 1855; Sidney O. Budington in 1860). Signed "OSBON". "THE BARK "GEORGE HENRY," CAPTAINSIDNEY O. BUDDINGTON[sic], OF NEW LONDON, WHICH STARTED FOR THE ARCTIC REGIONS ON TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1860.” 106
  • Capt. James M. Buddington of the whaler GEORGE HENRY found the HMS RESOLUTEand Capt. Sydney O. Buddington took Capt. C. F. Hall to the Arctic in the GEORGE HENRY Repository: G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport Creator: Buddington family Title: Buddington Family Collection Dates: 1706-1986 (bulk 1830-1863) http://library.mysticseaport.org/manuscripts/coll/coll257.cfm#head38545944 107
  • “Farewell Demonstration to Capt. Hall and His Comrades by the Geographical Society”“At the close of Capt. Hall’s remarks, Hon. Henry Grinnell presented him with a small American flag to take with him. Mr. Grinnell announcedthat the flag was a noted one. It was first used by Wilkes in Arctic exploration in 1838, and in 1850 Lieut. Walker carried it with him on his tripto the Antarctic Pole. It was also used by Lieut. DeHaven and by Dr. Kane in their searches for Sir John Franklin and afterward by Dr. Hayes.” http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F50B1EF93C5D117B93C5AB178DD85F458784F9 108
  • Commander George W. Delong & Henry Grinnell Retirement of the “FATHER OF AMERICAN ARCTIC DISCOVERY”*Voyage of the Jeannette edited by Emma DeLong, 1883 Voyage of the Jeannette edited by Emma DeLong, pg. 42 Voyage of the Jeannette edited by Emma DeLong, pg. 43 “From 1850 to 1870, Henry was a tireless advocate for Arctic exploration.” After retiring from Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in the early 1850’s, he spent most of his fortune searching for the lost Franklin Expedition and advancing Arctic science. *Capt. C. F. Hall in Geography in the Making: The American Geographical Society 1851-1951: by John K. Wright, 1952, pg. 57 (slide 753) 109
  • http://www.nunavutparks.com/english/parks-special-places/sylvia-grinnell-territorial-park/overview.aspx“American explorer Charles Halls 1861 journey with Inuit brought him in the vicinity ofthe park. Hall was the first to record that Frobishers Strait was actually a bay. Hallnamed a number of features in the upper bay after his financial backers. Among the placenames attributed by Hall is the Sylvia Grinnell River. Sylvia Grinnell was the name of thedaughter of C.F. Halls friend and benefactor, Henry Grinnell.” Sylvia moved to Englandand was one of the signees of William Bradford’s signature book (slide 146). 110
  • Henry Grinnell Obituary The New York Times July 2, 1874Henry was a member of Fish & Grinnell and Grinnell,Minturn & Co. from 1819 to 1850. In case the clippingon the right is illegible, Henry’s obituary states:“Throughout his whole career Henry Grinnell has neverlost sight of the sea – to use an Irish expression.Indeed, his name is more intimately connected withArctic explorations than with his daily avocations as ashipping merchant. That a large tract of the Arcticregions is called ‘Grinnell Land’ is sufficient testimonyto his liberality and enterprise in this direction. On the22nd May 1850 and again in 1854, Mr. Grinnell, withthe sanction of Congress, fitted out, at his own expense,and dispatched the vessels ADVANCE and RESCUE insearch of Sir John Franklin. Dr. Kane accompanied theexpeditions. Though wanting in success in theirprimary objects, the expeditions made severalgeographical discoveries of great importance, especiallythe open polar sea free from ice, and abounding inanimal life, lying in longitude 76 degrees west andrunning as far north as 82 30’ latitude… Mr. Grinnellwas not only an intimate friend of Henry Clay, but alsoof Daniel Webster…” Henry was brother & partner of Cornelius, Jr., Joseph, & Moses http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9504EFDB1139EF34BC4A53DFB166838F669FDE&scp=3&sq=henry+grinnell&st=p 111
  • http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9400EEDB1139EF34BC4B53DFB166838F669FDEhttp://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9400EEDB1139EF34BC4B53DFB166838F669FDE&scp=5&sq=grinnell+henry&st=p 112
  • Henry Grinnell 1799-1874NBWM Research Library NBWM Archives Moses to nephew Robert: May 29, 1874 Henry interred at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn 113
  • Henry’s son, Major Robert Minturn Grinnell, interred at Nice, France The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919Henry Grinnell and his brothers travelled extensively in Europe and had offices in London &Liverpool. Four of Henry’s nine children moved to Europe. Sarah and Robert lived in France.Sylvia and William lived in Britain. Major Robert Minturn Grinnell is buried in the British The Howland Heirs #346 and slide 146 http://www.whoislog.info/profile/henry-walton-grinnell.htmlCemetery in Nice, France. Documents from NBWM Research Library http://www.pdavis.nl/ShowBiog.php?id=1608 114
  • Henry Grinnell “extreme aversion to publicity” “Royal Geographic Certificate awarded to Henry Grinnell, Esq. of New York, making him a Foreign Honorary Member, 1852” Gift of Mary M. Grinnell NBWM #1987.10 Image ComingDictionary of American Biography: Vol. 8, pg. 2 (slide 763) http://ia700806.us.archive.org/11/items/dictionaryofamer08ilamer/dictionaryofamer08ilamer.pdf 115
  • Charles Dickens on Henry Grinnell Lady Franklin’s Revenge by Ken McGoogan No Survivors! Franklin Expedition Annihilated Sir John Franklin Graves of the three sailors from the Franklin Westminster Abbey Expedition, Beechey Is, Nunavut, Canada. (Replica Graves)http://www.martechpolar.com/Lost%20Expedition/Lost%20Expedition.htm http://www.yachtfiona.com/northwestpassage2009/newsletter1.html 116
  • Henry David Thoreau: “Does Mr. Grinnell know where he himself is?” http://ia600400.us.archive.org/32/items/thoreauswalden00thor/thoreauswalden00thor.pdf 117
  • Henry Grinnell & Henry David Thoreau by Prof. Russell A. PotterArctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875: by Russell A. Potter, 2007, pp. 118-119 http://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/POTARC.htmlThoreau: “Does Mr. Grinnell know where he himself is?” 118
  • Henry Grinnell was posthumously honored by Queen Victoria for his 20+ years of service in the Arctic with a desk made from the HMS RESOLUTE. RESOLUTE by Martin W. Sandler, 2006, pg. 218 Above: Henry Grinnell & Charles Dickens From 1850 to 1870, Henry Grinnell sponsored all the major American Expeditions. After Henry’s death, Queen Victoria honored him for his “twenty years of service” with this desk. If he had been born a British subject like his father, he would likely have been knighted afterRight: Henry Grinnell & the second U. S. Grinnell Expedition returned in 1855. Capt. Cornelius was born in 1758,Lords of the Admiralty when America was still ruled by England. The New York Times Oct. 4, 1879 119
  • The Grinnell Desk NBWM # 1983.58.1 Print given by Mary Grinnell Henry Grinnell & The Grinnell DeskFull title of: “England and America The Visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria to the Arctic Ship Resolute” The Bulletin from Johnny Cake Hill;New Bedford Whaling Museum, Winter/Spring 2009, pgs. 17& 18 Henry Grinnell was born in New Bedford on Feb. 18, 1799. Today, Henry has become a forgotten man in the city of his birth and was merely referred to as “a wealthy business man with New Bedford ties” in the above article. This chapter has shown that he had an international reputation in business and Arctic exploration in the mid 1800’s. It is hoped that this “digital initiative” will restore his rightful place in U.S history. 120
  • Chapter II. William Bradford, Albert Bierstadt, & the GrinnellsNew Bedford Whaling Museum #B81-24.98 https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/204364/ “Between the Iceberg and Field Ice” by William Bradford, 1869 121
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Bradford_(painter) Ref: “Bradford-Hayes Exploring Expedition” (slide 143) http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00615FF395F137B93C3A91782D85F4D8684F9http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00C13FF385E1A7493C4AB178ED85F4D8684F9 122
  • Bradford, Kane, & Grinnell Expeditions Arctic Regions by William Bradford, pg. viiEven though they were of different generations, William Bradford & Henry Grinnell had several similarities aside from beingtwo of the most successful men to come out of Old Dartmouth. They were both bitten hard by the “Arctic Bug” of the 1800’s;and they both lived in Manhattan, developed ties with British Royalty, and were honored by Queen Victoria. Henry was thefounding president of the American Geographical Society (slides 745+); and Wm. Bradford’s art expedition was affiliated withthat society. In fact, Wm. Bradford gave a lecture to the society that was published in their “1885 Bulletin No.2”. 123
  • Bradford in The New York Times and the “Scott Polar Research Institute Review 2008” Published: May 26, 1869 Copyright © The New York Times “A further acquisition is a group of letters, all addressed to William Bradford, relating to nineteenth century Arctic Exploration. Correspondents include John http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res= Rae, Lady Franklin, Charles Hall and George Nares.” by Naomi Boneham, pg. 19 F00C13FF385E1A7493C4AB178ED85F4D8684F9 124
  • William Bradford and Elisha Kent Kane The below note is in William Bradford’s copy of Kane’s Arctic Explorations, Vol. I: “good subject for rough water with vessel, cliffs in shadow with ice foot running out with vessel in ice with sea breaking on edge of ice”Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 70+ NBWM Research Library “PARTING HAWSERS OFF GODSEND LEDGE” by James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition 125
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCreator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane http://archive.org/details/arcticexplorati06kanegoog Commander Kane’s “KASARSOAK, SANDERSON’S HOPE, UPERNAVIK” Arctic Explorations, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 294+ 126
  • Arctic Regions by William Bradford Nearly identical to preceding slide from Kane’s Arctic Explorations Plate Number: 68 “View of Upernavik, the most northern settlement on the globe.The snow-clad summit of Kresarsoak seen in the distance.” (Dunmore and Critcherson, 1869) http://whalingmuseum-arcticvisions.org/chasing-the-light-2/ 127
  • Creator: Bradford, William --Dunmore & Chritcherson NBWM #2000.100.1893.13 “Fronticepiece of Bradford’s ‘Arctic Regions” 128
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum Collection https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/204363/ “Sermitsiaq Glacier with figure from Arctic Regions” by William Bradford, 1869 Ref: “Bradford-Hayes Exploring Expedition” http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00615FF395F137B93C3A91782D85F4D8684F9 129
  • NBWM #B81-24.62 “Looking Down the Karsut Fjord”“Consisting of 76 elephant folio-sized pages, Arctic Regions contains 141 albumen photographs, handtipped with the text. Under the patronage of Queen Victoria, this elaborately produced volume consistsof William Bradfords narrative account of his voyage on the PANTHER in 1869.” (NBWM records) 130
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #00.127.25 PANTHER in Ice Eight men with dead polar bears in foreground. Melville Bay, August 10, 1869. Hunting by steam, the party killing/six polar bears in one day.The stream of black soot & smoke in Bradford’s most famous works was the result of a coal-fed steam engine. As withNew Bedford factory smokestacks, this marked the beginning of man’s wholesale destruction of the environment. Itwas the beginning of global warming and the end of the pristine, pure Arctic that Bradford captured in his paintings. 131
  • NBWM #00.127.17 “Photograph of William Bradford sitting on a rock… at Arsut Fiord, Greenland” 132
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #B-20 “Auxiliary bark PANTHER in the ice under steam” 133
  • Creator: Bradford, William --Dunmore & Chritcherson NBWM #2000.100.1893.3 “PANTHER in ice” 134
  • Creator: Bradford, William --Dunmore & Chritcherson NBWM #2000.100.1893.49 “Vessels BEAR and THETIS” 135
  • Creator: Bradford, William --Dunmore & Chritcherson NBWM #B81-24.103_MSTR “Farthest Point Reached” “Number 103 from Bradfords Arctic Regions.” 136
  • “The steamer taking soundings… Capt. Bartlett finding water 500 feet.” Ref: “Bradford-Hayes Exploring Expedition” http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00615FF395F137B93C3A91782D85F4D8684F9 137
  • Creator: Bradford, William --Dunmore & Chritcherson NBWM #2000.100.1893.30 “Iviktut, with Kunak Mountain in the distance.” “Number 50 from Bradfords Arctic Regions.” 138
  • SECOND GRINNELL EXPEDITION, 1852-1855 Commanded by Dr. Kane and funded by Henry Grinnell, “author/advocate/sponsor” & CEO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Grinnell_Expedition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_GrinnellCreator: James Hamilton from a sketch by Dr. Kane Arctic Explorations, Vol. I by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856, pg. 76 Commander Kane’s “THE NIP OFF CAPE CORNELIUS GRINNELL, FORCE BAY” Cape Cornelius Grinnell was named after Henry’s father, Captain Cornelius Grinnell who died on April 19, 1850 (slide 501) just before the first Grinnell Expedition left New York on May 22, 1850. Since Henry had a brother and a son named Cornelius, it is possible that Cape Cornelius Grinnell was also named after them. Engraving proof courtesy of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, England (slide 124). http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum/catalogue/article/y57.8.2/ 139
  • NBWM #2009.9.19 Taken from: Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition, Vol. II by Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, 1856 Bradford’s colorized lantern slide of Kane’s “THE NIP OFF CAPE CORNELIUS GRINNELL…” “Lantern slide owned and possibly taken by William Bradford”, NBWM records. 140
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #00.127.9 Bradford painting based on Kane’s “THE NIP OFF CAPE CORNELIUS GRINNELL…” “Ship [USS ADVANCE ] in the ice in center middle ground, in front of a large iceberg…” Much more on Capt. Cornelius & Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. (Henry’s father & brother) in Chapter V (slide 404). 141
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #00.127.7 2nd Bradford painting based on Kane’s “THE NIP OFF CAPE CORNELIUS GRINNELL…” “Photo of a painting of two large vessels in ice…” Ship in distance is identical to Kane’s drawing (slide 139). The below notes are also in Bradford’s copy of Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition, Vol. II by Dr. Kane. Pg. 75. Shored Up (small drawing) – "another subject with vessel in the ice with rough water.” Pg. 79. Tracking Along the Ice Belt (small drawing) – "picture subject for composition for tracking the vessel”. 142
  • “Bradford-Hayes Exploring Expedition” The New York Times Sept. 1, 1869 http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res= F00615FF395F137B93C3A91782D85F4D8684F9 143
  • Newfoundland Fishing Schooners Square Island Harbor LabradorPhoto is not from Bradford-Hayes Expedition.Before going to Greenland,Bradford spent fivesummers drawing & painting up to Labrador. Creators: Pierce, William H. --Bradford, William NBWM #2000.100.26 144
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #1989.50 “ship from port bow under full sail” 145
  • William Bradford’s Signature Book from England Sylvia Grinnell Henry’s Daughter Granddaughter of Capt. Cornelius NBWM Archives Sylvia Grinnell Park, slide 110 146
  • William Bradford’s Signature Book from England NBWM ArchivesDuke Lord Dufferin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Hamilton-Temple- Blackwood,_1st_Marquess_of_Dufferin_and_Ava Explorer Frank L. McClintock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Leopold_McClintock British Explorer John Rae, M.D. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rae_(explorer) 147
  • William Bradford’s Signature Book NBWM Archives Lady Jane Franklinhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Franklin 148
  • William Bradford’s Signature Book NBWM ArchivesExplorer Isaac Israel Hayes, M.D. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Israel_Hayes J. Carson Brevoort American Geographic Societyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Carson_Brevoort Richard Kimball writer for Bradford 149
  • RICHARD C. KUGLER“The Ice Dwellers Watching the Invaders” by William Bradford Gift of William F. Havemeyer, 1910 William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/william-bradford-sailing-ships-amp-artic-seas.html 150
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1972.33 Purchased with funds donated by Andrew G. Hobbs “Sealers Crushed by Icebergs” by William Bradford, 1866 In William Bradford: Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas, NBWM Director Emeritus Richard Kluger wrote: “Returning from Labrador [fall, 1865], Bradford resumed work on his large painting [Sealers]. Toward the end of January 1866, a journalist from Philadelphia called at the Tenth Street Building and found the work ‘on the scaffold in a condition of forwardness.’... Then walking through the side door into Bierstadt’s studio, he confronted Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mount Rosalie, ‘as big as the side of a house,’ also nearing completion…” William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 121 151
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #2001.100.4449 “Caught in the Ice Floes” by William Bradford, 1867 “This is a scene of several sealing brigs caught in the ice off the Labrador coast. In the far background, left, a ship is being burned to eliminate it as a future hazard to navigation. Crew members are seen dragging small boats over the pack ice to an open lead of water in the foreground. The dismasted brig on the far right is being abandoned, with a makeshift tent set up on the ice.” (NBWM records) 152
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #2001.100.4324 “Caught Among the Icebergs After a Storm” by William Bradford, c. 1880 153
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #2001.100.4441 “The PANTHER - Trapped in Ice in Melville Bay” by William Bradford, 1883 Ref: “Bradford-Hayes Exploring Expedition” http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00615FF395F137B93C3A91782D85F4D8684F9 154
  • “The PANTHER in Melville Bay” by William Bradford, 1873 The Royal Collection © 2002. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II“The steamer Panther, specially built for Arctic navigation, was commanded by Captain John Bartlett. The expedition, solely for the purposes of art,left St John’s, Newfoundland, on 3 July 1869 flying the U.S. flag, and returned on 3 October. Melville Bay is a coastline of nearly 250 miles fromWilcox Point to Cape York on the north-west coast of Greenland. Bradford sketched the midnight sun and the amazing scenery along the coast. Thekinds of hazards the expedition faced are recorded in the painting. The artist noted that the picture depicted a moment ‘when the steamer came near tobeing lost by being forced on the Icebergs by pressure of the field of ice…’ The painting was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1875.” http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/401327/the-panther-in-melville-bay 155
  • Artist: William Bradford NBWM #1957.6.1 Etching based on "The PANTHER in Melville Bay” “This etching is based, somewhat loosely, on Bradfords painting of ‘The PANTHER in Melville Bay’, which he painted for Queen Victoria, which is reproduced in fig. 21 in R.C. Kuglers essay in the 2003 Bradford Exhibition catalogue.” (NBWM records) 156
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1981.55 “View of the Sermitsialik Glacier” by William Bradford, 1873 “The steam bark PANTHER is at the far right. The glacier is coming to the waters edge under a dark and cloudy sky forming in the background. The location is South Greenland. Painted for the Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria.” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 137 157
  • Artist: William Bradford NBWM #1991.4 “Icebound” 158
  • NBWM #00.127.10 Painting in Glenbow Museum , Calgary, Canada Wm. Bradford’s photo of his “The POLARIS in Winter Quarters in Thank God Harbor”, 1875"In 1875, William Bradford completed a 6 x 10-foot painting, now in the Glenbow Museum, depicting an ill-fated attempt to reach the hitherto unvisited North Pole.By an act of Congress, fifty-thousand dollars was allocated for the purpose, along with a steam-powered vessel, the Polaris, made available by the U.S. Navy. Agroup of scientists was also assembled to establish the exact location of the Pole. On September 31, 1871, the vessel sailed to northern Greenland and set up a basefor the scientific party at Thank God Harbor. From the start, the expedition was troubled as rival factions engaged, presumably over the conduct of the shipscommander, Charles Francis Hall, who died from arsenic poison shortly after the base was established. With his death, the remainder of the crew and the scientificparty abandoned the purpose of the voyage and departed from the Arctic without completing its mission.” Quotation attributed to Richard Kugler by artfact.com. 159
  • William Bradford & USS POLARISWilliam Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum 160
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1968.59 Purchased with funds donated by W. Myron Owen “Seiners on the Coast of Labrador” by William Bradford, c. 1871 William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 123 161
  • NBWM #2000.100.3425 “William Bradfords studio (Union Wharf, Fairhaven)” “left to right: Mrs. DeLong, unidentified, William Bradford, Miss Mary E. Bradford,Sylvie DeLong (seated on floor), Mrs. William Bradford, Edward Hacher of Lynn and his wife.” (NBWM records) William Bradford made six “art expeditions” to Labrador and one to Greenland. He was born in Fairhaven and grew up around New Bedford Harbor. Note the polar bear rugs in photo. 162
  • NBWM #1987.26.40William Bradford’s Home on New Bedford Harbor 16 Fort Street, Fairhaven 163
  • NBWM #2000.100.1746William Bradford’s Fort St. House Interior Note: Polar Bear Rugs 164
  • William Bradford’s Studio FairhavenWilliam Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by R. C. Kugler, p. 7 165
  • Creator: James E. Reynolds NBWM #1979.52.3 Location of Wm. Bradford’s first studio, Fairhaven 166
  • Abraham Lincoln, William Bradford, Joseph Grinnell, & John Greenleaf Whittier Grinnell Lincoln http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell Whittier William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum 167
  • Congressman Joseph Grinnell to Abraham Lincoln Tuesday, October 25, 1864 Regarding: Mrs. William (Mary) Bradford The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress It is believed that Congressmen Joseph & Moses wrote letters to politicians in support of Henry’s Arctic expeditions. Unfortunately, very few of the Grinnell brothers’ letters have survived. Joseph was an older brother of Henry & Moses. He is known to have had a significant art collection (slides 477 & 485), and he undoubtedly knew both William Bradford & Albert Bierstadt. Since Joseph had retired from politics in 1851, 13 years before he wrote this letter to Lincoln, he did not assist Mary Bradford as a political duty or favor. In 1864, Joseph was 75 years old and simultaneously functioning as president of the Wamsutta Mills, president of the New Bedford & Taunton Railroad, and president of the First National Bank (slide 500). Joseph Grinnell 1788-1885 President: Fish, Grinnell & Co. President: Marine Bank and First National Bank President: New Bedford & Taunton Railroad President: Wamsutta Mills, 1847-1885 Member: Grinnell, Minturn & Co. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell Abraham Lincoln stayed at Joseph’s County St. mansion on Sept. 14, 1848 (The Daily Mercury). Joseph was the 2nd son of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia. http://www.abrahamlincolnsclassroom.org/Library/newsletter.asp?ID=54&CRLI=134http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=mal&fileName=mal1/375/3759800/malpage.db&recNum=0 168
  • Poet-Abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier to William BradfordNew Bedford Whaling Museum Archives 169
  • John Greenleaf Whittier, Joseph Grinnell, & William Bradford The below quotations are from Old-Time Fairhaven by Charles A. Harris, 1947, pgs. 225 & 172. “In 1870, there was formed… an organization called the Fairhaven Union Association for Christian Work, and at its first meeting, Mr. Bradford gave stereopticon lecture gratis, and soon became its president.” “The first regular meeting of the Fairhaven UnionAbove: New Bedford Republican Standard, July 7, 1870 Association for Christian Work was held last evening (Thursday, July 7, 1870) in Phoenix Hall.” It seems highly likely that Whittier was visiting Joseph Grinnell on this date in order to see their mutual friend Bradford’s stereopticon lecture. Much more on Joseph at slides 473, etc. His mansion is at slides 460, etc. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Greenleaf_Whittier “John Greenleaf Whittier (December 17, 1807 – September 7, 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and ardent advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States… In 1833, Whittier published the antislavery pamphlet Justice and Expediency,[7] and from there dedicated the next twenty years of his life to the abolitionist cause. The controversial pamphlet destroyed all of his political hopes—as his demand for immediate emancipation alienated both northern businessmen and southern slaveholders—but it also sealed his commitment to a cause that he deemed morally correct and socially necessary. He was a founding member of the American Anti- Slavery Society and signed the Anti-Slavery Declaration of 1833, which he often considered the most significant action of his life… From 1838 to 1840, he was editor of The Pennsylvania Freeman in Philadelphia, one of the leading antislavery papers in the North… Whittier produced two collections of antislavery poetry: Poems Written during the Progress of the Abolition Question in the United States, between 1830 and 1838 and Voices of Freedom (1846)…” 170
  • Harriet Jacobs Abolitionists Harriet Jacobs and Cornelia Grinnell Cornelia lost her parents and was adopted by her uncle Joseph GrinnellCornelia was born on March 19, 1825. Her father, Cornelius Grinnell, Jr., was a founding partner of Post, Grinnell, & Minturn in New York, aMassachusetts State Representative, ship owner/agent, and light house builder. Her mother was the former Eliza Tallman Russell, and Corneliawas the youngest of ten children. Nine of the children were living when their mother died on Jan. 9, 1827. On Oct. 9, 1828, Cornelius,Jr. married his wifes sister, Mary Russell. On Dec. 11, 1830 Cornelius, Jr. took his own life; and Cornelia became an orphan when she was onlyfive years old. Shortly after Cornelius, Jr.’s tragic death, Cornelias uncle Joseph and his wife took her on an tour of Europe while they built amansion next door to Cornelias home (corner of County and Hawthorn Streets). Joseph adopted her after her stepmother died in 1838. In 1846,Cornelia married the famous writer, N.P. Willis. Harriet Jacobs, a former slave, worked as a nanny for the Willis family; and she wrote herfamous work, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, while living with Cornelia. In 1852, Cornelia purchased Harriet’s freedom. Due to N.P.Willis’s pro-slavery sympathies, Harriet was afraid to discuss her writing with Cornelia. For the rest of her life Harriet had a close relationshipwith Cornelia and her children, and it has been reported that Cornelia and her daughter Edith lived in Harriet’s boarding house in Cambridgeafter Uncle Joe died in 1885. The bond between Cornelia and Uncle Joe was so strong that Cornelia and Edith are buried next to him and hiswives in Oak Grove Cemetery (slide 502) instead of being buried with Cornelia’s husband, who was buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery,Cambridge. Harriet was also buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, which is one of the most famous cemeteries in the country.The above photos are from: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, edited by Jean Fagin Yellin. http://www.harrietjacobs.org/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 171
  • Cornelia’s Letters in the Library of CongressCornelias contribution to the Abolitionist Movement was described by J. F. Yellin: “In 1850, Congresspassed a Fugitive Slave Law ruling that all citizens, including those in northern states where slavery hadbeen abolished, were subject to punishment if they aided fugitives… [Harriet] met Nathaniel ParkerWillis’s new wife, Cornelia Grinnell Willis, and was employed to care for her newborn baby… To free her,and reassure her about her children’s freedom, Mrs. Willis arranged for the American Colonization Societyto act as an intermediary and early in 1852 bought Jacobs freedom… This transaction, effected with theaid of Rev. John B. Pinney of the New York Colonization Society, is explained in a letter from CorneliaGrinnell Willis to Elizabeth Davis Bliss Bancroft [May 3, 1852], Bancroft-Bliss Family Papers, LibraryCongress.” Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, edited by J. F. Yellin, p. 291 Cornelia Grinnell Statue by Horatio Greenough “Mr. [Joseph] Grinnell was in Florence in the spring of 1830 and there employed Horatio Greenough, the sculptor, to make him a statue of his niece, then a child of five years.” (New-Bedford Mercury, slide 493) “Horatio Greenough (September 6, 1805 – December 18, 1852) was an American sculptor best known for his United States government commissions The Rescue (1837-1850) and George Washington (1840). [He was the first artist to receive a commission from Congress] His sculptures reflected truth and reality, but also ancient classical aesthetic ideals… Many of Horatio’s works were done in Florence, Italy where he spent most of his professional life... Some of his other sculptures include: James Fenimore Cooper (1831), Castor and Pollux (1847, Marquis de Lafayette (1831-1832)… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Greenough The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 253 NBWM #1979.43 172
  • Horatio Greenough at the Smithsonian and the Boston Athenaeum Boston Athenaeum Smithsonian Institution Press Horatio Greenough at the MFA (slide 489)Eleven of Horatio’s sculptures are in the Museum of Fine Artshttp://www.mfa.org/search/collections?keyword=horatio+greenough&objecttype=77 Greenough’s Venus Victrix http://www.smithsonianlegacies.si.edu/objectdescription.cfm?ID=66 http://www.bostonathenaeum.org/ 173
  • Collection of the Edgartown Yacht Club http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/articles/article.cfm?request=436 “New York Yacht Club Regatta off New Bedford” by William Bradford, 1856 174
  • “The New York Yacht Club Regatta” Bradford & Grinnell BrothersAbove description is of preceding painting. The New Bedford Yacht Club: by Llewellyn Howland III, 2002 175
  • “Stowing Sails off Fairhaven” by William Bradford (Schooner MOSES H. GRINNELL) Above comments are about “New York Yacht Club Regatta off Clark’s Point”, 1856 (slide 174).Author: Richard C. Kugler http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/articles/article.cfm?request=436 176
  • Schooner MOSES H. GRINNELL Subject of Bradford’s “Stowing Sails off Fairhaven” Schooner MOSES H. GRINNELL Designed by George Steers, 1850In 1856, Moses Grinnell purchased the schooner yacht HAZE, which had been designed by George Steers in 1853.He sailed it to New Bedford that summer for the New York Yacht Club Annual Cruise (slides 516+).http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell The Search For Speed Under Sail 1700-1855: by Howard I. Chapelle 177
  • Cornelius Grinnell, Sr.CorneliusGrinnell Glacial Boulder Riverside Cemetery, Fairhaven William Bradford Grave with Whittier Quotation It is believed that the Cornelius Grinnell, Sr. buried to the right of Bradford was one of several Grinnells named after Capt. Cornelius. He was born in Little Compton and was Henry’s cousin. They were both born in 1799. To further complicate matters, this Cornelius had a son named Cornelius (slide 261), and Henry also had a brother & son named Cornelius. 178
  • Riverside Cemetery, Fairhaven Glacial Boulder Gift of Admiral Robert Peary Placed in the ground to the right of Bradford’s grave marker. 179
  • Congressman Joseph Grinnell, Abraham Lincoln, & John Quincy Adamshttp://archive.org/details/historyofnewbedf01peas Both Abraham Lincoln and President John Quincy Adams stayed at Joseph Grinnell’s home. 180
  • Joseph Grinnell, Abraham Lincoln, & John Quincy Adams http://archive.org/details/historyofnewbedf01peasMore on Joseph Grinnell and John Quincy Adams at slide 476 (includes Capt. Cornelius). 181
  • Congressman Joseph Grinnell: Wamsutta Mills President 1847-1885More on Joseph and Wamsutta Mills at slide 494. http://archive.org/details/historyofnewbedf01peas 182
  • Joseph Grinnell: President of the Marine Bank (First National Bank of N. B.) More on Joseph and banking at slide 434+. http://archive.org/details/historyofnewbedf01peas 183
  • Photo: Millicent Library ML 0286 http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinnerpub/3308880267/ William Bradford Double House Center Street, Fairhaven, c. 1890 The Bradford’s owned the far half of this double house. These houses were destroyed when the Town Hall was built in 1892, and this photo was taken when William Bradford’s side of the house was being dismantled (?). Fairhaven was a part of New Bedford until 1812, and Henry Huttleston Rogers tore down several homes to make way for the grand institutional buildings he donated. 184
  • Photo: Millicent Library ML 0284 http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinnerpub/3309708876/ Center St., Fairhaven, Bradford Double House To the right is the double house that Wm. Bradford. To the far left was the home of Capt. Joshua Grinnell. Dr. Atwood’s house in the middle was also destroyed to make way for the new town hall. 185
  • Capt. Joshua Bradford’s Home Map of Fairhaven, 1871 Grinnell Home Demolished to makeBradford’s Studio way for town hall.Location of Brass Plaque F. W. Beers, New York Houses demolished for Millicent Library http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/7972/Rotate/Fair+Haven+Town/Bristol+County+1871/Massachusetts/ 186
  • Bradford & Bierstadt: Grew up in Old Dartmouth & became friends & colleagues. Left: Bradford visited Beirstadt at Malkasten Irvington on Hudson, where Moses Grinnell also lived. William Bradford, 1878 Creator: Bradley & Rulofson, NBWM #00.127.27William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by R. C. Kugler 187
  • http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/archives/image/4084/image http://user.xmission.com/~emailbox/glenda/bierstadt/malkasten.html Bierstadt’s Malkasten. Irvington on Hudson“The base dimensions of the house were 100 feet by 75 feet. Within was a studio 30 feet wide by 30 feet high with 20-foot-tall sliding glass windowsoutside and 20-foot-tall sliding doors inside that opened to a library/music room. When opened, the two rooms became one that was 70 feet long, agood size space to view his canvases of up to fifteen feet by nine feet.” Moses Grinnell’s estate was between Malkasten and the Hudson River. http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/rob/?p=606 188
  • Chas. Bierstadt, photographer http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/archives/set/70/bierstadt_collection_1863-1957. Bierstadt’s Studio & Library at Malkasten, Irvington, NYMoses was a neighbor of Albert Bierstadt; and Henry & Joseph must have often visited their brother, nieces, and nephew along theHudson River. Henry & Moses Grinnell, William Bradford, and Albert Bierstadt had common Old Dartmouth Roots; and Bierstadt andBradford had adjacent studios in Manhattan where Grinnell, Minturn offices and wharf were located (slides 507+). Thus, it is highlylikely that the Grinnell family knew Albert Bierstadt and William Bradford and visited the above studio when they were in Irvington. 189
  • Photo: New York Public Library. Taken long after the artists died. Bradford & Bierstadt Tenth Street Studios The artist-friends from Old Dartmouth had adjacent studios in this building, with a connecting door.“Thomas Bailey Aldrich wrote in 1866: … on the ground floor are the studios of Whittredge, Bradford, Dana, Beard, Thompson the sculptor, Le Clear,Guy, and Bierstadt. The second floor is occupied by Church, McEntee, Leutze, Hays, Hart, and Gignoux. Mr. Tuckerman, the author, has a pleasant studyand library on this floor. On the third story are Gifford, Hubbard, Suydam, Shattuck, Thorndike, Haseltine, de Haas, Brown, Casilear, and Martin.” Text: http://helenadekaygilder.org/10th/index.htm 190
  • Tenth Street Studio of Albert Bierstadt & William Merritt Chase Photo when occupied by Chase, c. 1880“William Merritt Chase (who took over Bierstadt’s studio…” from Albert Bierstadt: Painter of the American West by Gordon Hendricks pg. 93.“Richard Morris Hunt was the architect that designed the building. (He was William Morris Hunts brother, the artist and teacher in Boston…This studio building was the center of the art world in New York City for many years. Winslow Homer, John La Farge, William Merritt Chase,Frederic Church [William Bradford, Albert Bierstadt, Mark Twain]… and over 150 other artists were tenants at one time or another.”Photo: Archives of American Art Text: http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/images/detail/william-merritt-chases-10th-street-studio-new-york-ny-5392 191
  • "Reception at the Tenth Street Studios”from "Frank Leslies Illustrated Newspaper” 1869 http://helenadekaygilder.org/10th/index.htm 192
  • “Sailboats on the Hudson at Irvington” by Albert Bierstadt, 1889Moses Grinnell owned 38 acres between Bierstadt’s Malkasten and the river, including the waterfront (slides 210-214). This view is near thetwo Victorian mansions that Moses built. He purchased this property in 1850, which was the first year of the U. S. Grinnell Expedition,Henry’s first expedition. 1850 was also the year that Capt. Cornelius died, and it seems likely that the will of this old sea captain, ship owner,and banker provided some of the funds for these large expenditures. That his sons could finance arctic expeditions and purchase 38 acres onthe Hudson River was only part of patriot Cornelius Grinnell’s legacy to his family and country. Irving Grinnell, Moses’s son, had an estate onthe Hudson near Poughkeepsie called Netherwood (slide 548+). It was also destroyed, and the land is now part of Bowdoin Park. Private Collection http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bierstadt_Albert_Sailboats_on_the_Hudson_at_Irvington.jpg 193
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1904.63 “Bartholomew Gosnold at Cuttyhunk” by Albert Bierstadt, 1858 Albert Bierstadt grew up in New Bedford, and most boats passing in and out of New Bedford Harbor sail by the little island of Cuttyhunk. https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/201742 194
  • “Sunset Light, Wind River Range of the Rocky Mountains” by Albert Bierstadt, 1861 (39” X 60”) New Bedford Free Public Library 195
  • “Rocky Mountains in the Selkirk Range, near the Canadian Border, Mount Sir Donald” by Albert Bierstadt New Bedford Free Public Library (83.5 × 57.5 in.) Bierstadt Bros: NBWM #1986.34.2 Albert Bierstadt 196
  • “Sunset near the Platte River or Salt Lick at Sunset Glow” by Albert Bierstadt: New Bedford Free Public Library (39 × 60 in.) 197
  • Photographer: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.159 Bierstadt Family Home, New Bedford Acushnet Avenue & Mill Street (DEMOLISHED) 198
  • NBWM #1986.34.3NBWM #1986.34.1 NBWM #1986.34.4 “Sunlight and Shade” Sketch by Albert Bierstadt, 1862 Gift of Miss Mary M. Grinnell 199
  • Albert Bierstadt’s New Bedford Studio Portrait of Albert Bierstadt NBWM #2000.100.2603William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 NBWM, p. 11 200
  • Albert Bierstadt Charles Bierstadt Photo: D. J. Pimentel Albert Bierstadt Family, New Bedford Rural Cemetery Front row: Charles Bierstadt; Henry & wife Christina; Eliza Bierstadt; Albert Bierstadt.“Albert Bierstadt created grandiose, dramatic scenes of the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevadas that lured many people to visit those sites. Bierstadt was born inSolingen, near Dusseldorf, Germany [1830], and sailed as a baby with his family who settled in New Bedford, Massachusetts… In 1853, he returned to Dusseldorf wherehe studied at the Royal Academy with landscape painters Andreas Aschenbach and Karl Friedman Lessing… In 1857, he returned to the United States and painted theWhite Mountains of New Hampshire, and in 1858, exhibited for the first time at the National Academy of Design in New York… In January 1859, he heard a lecture inNew Bedford on the American West by Bayard Taylor… and this exposure stirred an interest that played a large part in his future career. Meanwhile, he had settled intoNew York City where he lived and occupied a studio in the Tenth Street Building, which had 25 studio spaces and became well known for its prestigious occupants…” http://www.askart.com/AskART/artists/biography.aspx?searchtype=BIO&artist=6467 201
  • Grinnell Mansion (Delmonico’s) Fifth AvenueIn the late 1850’s, Moses retired from 30+years as president of Fish, Grinnell & Co.and Grinnell, Minturn & Co. He sold hismansion on Fifth Ave. to Delmonico’s andmoved to his country estate in Irvington-on-Hudson (slides 209+). The following isfrom Delmonico’s web site:East 14th Street - Six years after openingthe Chambers Street restaurant, Lorenzomoved again further uptown to UnionSquare. On April 9, 1862, Lorenzo openeda converted mansion at Fifth Avenue andEast 14th Street into the most luxuriousrestaurant that had ever existed in NewYork. The entrance was No. 1 East 14thStreet, one block west of Union Square.The reviews were outstanding. Wrote aTribune representative: "As New Yorkspreads herself, so must the House ofDelmonico dilate. Before Fifth Avenue wasbuilt, there was the downtown Delmonico;when it was achieved, there were theChambers Street and BroadwayDelmonico’s; and now that Central Park isundertaken, precedent to a line of noblemansions to its walls, Delmonico hasspread up to the corner of Fifth Avenue andFourteenth Street…http://www.delmonicosny.com/about,77,26,Delmonicos_History.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 202
  • Moses Grinnell Mansion, 14th St. & Fifth Ave., c. 1865http://collections.mcny.org/C.aspx?VP3=SearchResult_VPage&VBID=24UP1GULSGHJ&SMLS=1&RW=1824&RH=936 Museum of the City of New York 203
  • Moses Grinnell’s 5th Ave. mansion under the ownership of Delmonico’s.“New York City : 12th annual dinner of the Dartmouth College Alumni Association of New York, at Delmonicos, Wednesday evening, January 19th.” [1876] New York Public Library Digital Gallery: Image ID: 809549 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 204
  • Lady Franklin visited Henry Grinnell at his home on Bond Street, Manhattan. Lady Franklin’s Revenge by Ken McGoogan, p. 397 The Grinnell brothers knew Abraham Lincoln & General Grant; and they all made large contributions to the Union Cause. Henry was the more conservative brother; but he was not a Southern sympathizer in any way, as the above seems to state. Like most Brits, Lady Franklin was anti-slavery, Albert Gallatin’s Residence, Bond Street too. (Treasury Secretary & NYU Founder)Bond Street, 1830’s Henry’s home was similar. “The architecture on Bond drew the attention of the 1833 guidebook New York as It Is, which claimed the mansions on Bond “may vie, for beauty and taste, with European palaces.” Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, politician, diplomat, congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. In 1831, he founded... New York University.” http://mediahistoryny.wordpress.com/bond-street/ & WikipediaAccording to Sturgis S. Dunham (below), Bond St. was far from a fashionable address when Lady Franklin visited Henry. Since Henry spentmost of his fortune on Arctic exploration, he could not afford to move to a 38-acre estate on the Hudson like his brother Moses (slides 209+). http://thehistorybox.com/ny_city/nycity_historical_bond_st_pt_1__article00344.htm 205
  • Hetty Green was married at Henry’s home on July 11, 1867 Hetty Green was a great granddaughter of Henry’s grandfather, Gideon Howland (Sr.) of Round Hill. Hetty Married at Henry’sN.Y. Home The Witch of Wall Street by Sparkes & Moore 206
  • Hetty Green & Henry Grinnell Henry’sNY Home & Hetty Green The Witch of Wall Street by Sparkes & Moore 207
  • Hetty Green The New York Times July 4, 1916 Her [Hetty Green’s] father was a successful merchant and ship owner in the days when it meant more to own ships hailing from New Bedford than it does now… He became through marriage a partner in the firm of I. Howland, Jr., & Co. Coming to New York in 1850 he became associated with William T. Coleman & Co, shipping merchants… When he died in 1865 he left a fortune of $9,000,000, which Hetty Green, his only child, inherited… She had had frequent trips to New York, and she came here finally to stay when she was 29 years old, in 1863, joining her father at his home here. She was chaperoned by the Grinnell family, with whom she was connected on her mother’s side, a fact which meant much in those days and gave her entry in exclusive circles [including the top echelons of Wall Street]… (Partial Article) Shortly after her father’s death, her aunt, Miss[Sylvia Ann] Howland, died. This aunt left a fortune amounting to $4,000,000… In this second suit Hetty Robinson alleged that her aunt, being on bad terms with her father, and not wishing him to get any of the Howland money, requested her to make a will excluding her father from any share in her estate, and agreed to make a similar will which would leave the aunt’s fortune to the niece.http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9C0DE4DD103DE333A25757C0A9619C946796D6CF&scp=20&sq=hetty+green&st=p 208
  • Moses Grinnell retired to Irvington, NY & was a neighbor of Albert Bierstadt & Washington Irving.http://www.museumofwashingtonirving.com/ Creator: Frederick Langenheim, 1856 New York Public Library #1531122 Washington Irving’s Sunnyside Moses Grinnell’s Wolferts Dell, 1856 “Washington Irving designed Sunnyside and its grounds “One of the first merchants to build here around 1850 was Moses Hicks himself, collaborating with his neighbor, the artist George Grinnell, a one-time United States representative, real estate developer, Harvey. "It is a beautiful spot," Irving wrote, "capable of being merchant, and financier. His high society connections extended beyond made a little paradise." Beginning in 1835, he expanded a small business; in 1836 Grinnell married Julia Irving, niece of the famous author cottage in stages, combining his sentimental interests in the Washington Irving. It was immediately north of Irvings "Sunnyside" that architecture of colonial New York and buildings he knew in Grinnell settled in the early 1850s. For himself, he built a mansion known Scotland and Spain. The house became a three-dimensional as "Wolferts Dell”; about the same time or shortly thereafter, he built a autobiography. The grounds reflect Washington Irvings second mansion, similar in appearance to his own, on the northern portion romantic view of art, nature, and history.” of his 38-acre estate. In the 1850s, Grinnells niece, Mary Russell Grinnell, resided in the northerly mansion with her husband Henry Holdredge.” http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/yasinsac/spratt/spratt.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 209
  • Bierstadt built Malkasten adjacent to Moses Grinnell’s Wolferts Dell. Albert Bierstadt Malkasten Artist Albert Beirstadt’s Estate Built 1864, Destroyed 1882 (slides 187+) Moses H. Grinnell’s niece Wolferts Dell M. H. Grinnell Moses Grinnell’s Estate (Built 1850, Destroyed) M. H. Grinnell Sunnyside Washington Irving’s Estate Hudson River (Open to Public) Washington Irving Plate 26: Hastings upon Hudson - Dobbs Ferry – Irvington, 1868 Creator: Beers, F. W., New York Public Library ID: 1516818 1861 Map by F. W. Beers“Malkasten’s architect was the English-born Jacob Wrey Mould… With Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted, Mould designed some of Central Park’smost-cherished features including Belevedere Castle and Bethesda Terrace. With Vaux, Mould also designed the original buildings of the American Museumof Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Also in connection with the Malkasten, or the neighborhood in which it was built, Mould was broughtto New York to design the All Souls Church [Unitarian] by a fellow named Moses Hicks Grinnell. Grinnell owned an estate near Malkasten…”http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/rob/?p=606Moses was a member of the All Souls Church, and his funeral was held there. He was a Commissioner of Central Park 1860-1869.http://www.nycgovparks.org/about/history/commissionersAfter her parents died, Joseph adopted Cornelia Grinnell, youngest child of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. She married N. P. Willis and they had an estate at Cornwall-on-Hudson called Idlewild (slide 491). It was also designed by Calvert Vaux, and it was about 20 miles from Irvington. http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/2593/Greenburgh+Town/New+York+and+its+Vicinity+1867/New+York/ 210
  • Moses Grinnell’s 1850 Estate Wolferts Dell, Irvington, N.Y. Photo c. 1932 “The columned porch was likely added to the house by theHopkinses or the owners just before them. It was fashionable at this time to remodel the older dark Victorian homes thenseen as out of taste. Large columned porches became a trendy ideal on some of the old Hudson River homes in this area.” http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/yasinsac/spratt/spratt.html 1927 Ad: “22 Acres with 600 feet of Hudson River Shore Front” http://digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/ ryr&CISOPTR=372&CISOBOX=1&REC=2 Robert Yarnall Richie photograph collection, Southern Methodist University 211
  • Moses Grinnell’s Estate, Irvington, N.Y. c. 1932“The house [sans columns] was built around 1850 by Moses Grinnell for his niece, Mary Russell, and her husband…” http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/yasinsac/spratt/spratt.html http://digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/ryr&CISOPTR=362&CISOBOX=1&REC=1 212
  • Verusselle on Moses Grinnell’s Estate c. 1920 The exterior walls of the original Victorian mansion built by Moses were surrounded by neoclassical columns, and the result was named Verusselle. It is of interest to note that the Library of Congress lists the mansion that Moses originally built for his niece as merely the Lyndhurst… Cottage; and the grounds are now included in the Lyndhurst estate (slide 215). Lyndhurst was designed in 1838 by Alexander Jackson Davis; and in 1845 he designed a Gothic Cottage for William J. Rotch in New Bedford (slides 617+). Mr. Rotch lived about two blocks from Joseph Grinnell, and it was his grandfather who employed Cornelius Grinnell as a captain in the the 1790’s (slide 10). After being abandoned for many years, Verusselle was used in the TV series “Dark Shadows” in the 1960’s. Like Beirstadt’s Malkasten, it burned to the ground (1969). “The South End of Tarrytown, by virtue of its location 25 miles north of Manhattan, contained one of the greatest concentrations of estates along the Hudson River. Washington Irving, who penned The Legend of 1891 Map Sleepy Hollow and other famous tales, settled here inWolferts Dell was the original 1835… His neighborhood became quite crowded aftername of Moses Grinnell’s estate. Lyndhurst 1850, when the Hudson River Rail Road enabledThe vacant land is now included merchant millionaires to commute from home to Newin the Lyndhurst estate. York City in under an hour… by the 1880s many homes fell into disuse owing to high maintenance costs or Wolferts Dell because their owners chose newly fashionable locales Moses Grinnell Wolferts Dell Original Owner such as Newport, RI, for their summer retreats. ” http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org/yasinsac/spratt/spratt.html Moses Grinnell’s Estate Hudson (Moses died in 1877) River SunnysideWashington Irving’s Estate http://lyndhurst.org/history/virtual-tour/ 213
  • “…Lyndhurst, residence in Irvington, New York. Cottage entrance, view I." 1943 Oct. 9. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Gottscho-Schleisner Collection, Reproduction Number LC-G612-T-44125 DLC Verusselle on Moses Grinnell’s Estate, Irvington, NYEven though the Victorian mansion built by Moses Grinnell was dramatically remodeled, it still illustrates the financial success thatHenry, Moses, and Joseph attained from the solid foundation they had been given in New Bedford by the extended Grinnell &Howland family. Moses also maintained a second home in New Bedford, which he left to his nephew Lawrence. The businessacumen of the Grinnell-Howland family combined with the golden era of whaling produced three brothers/partners who worked andplayed on the world stage along with European royalty, robber barons like Jay Gould & “Hell Hound” Rogers, and artists like Wm.Bradford & Albert Bierstadt. Not exactly at the same level; but these Grinnell brothers were internationally known in their day. 214
  • Jay Gould’s Lyndhurst (open to public) Next door to the estates of Albert Bierstadt & Moses GrinnellIn one generation, the sons of a common New Bedford sailor became associated with robber barons and European royalty.Julia Grinnell, who was the only daughter of Moses & Julia Irving Grinnell, married George Bowdoin, who was a personal friend and partner of J. P. Morgan. George was a neighbor and close friend of Julia’s brother, Irving (slides 548+). http://lyndhurst.org/history/virtual-tour/ 215
  • Chapter III. Tall Ships, Bradford’s Fairhaven, & Henry H. RogersNBWM #2001.100.4508 “Bark ORIOLE of Fairhaven” by William Bradford 216
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #00.32 "Clarks Point Light, New Bedford” by William Bradford, 1854 217
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1987.31 “New Bedford Harbor at Sunset” by William Bradford, 1858 “The full-rigged ship under sail at left is the ship OTHELLO (based on the New Bedford Evening Standards account of 7/8/1858, describing the Bierstadt-Hopkins New Bedford Art Exhibition of 1858) belonging to T. and A. R. Nye.” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 99 218
  • NBWM #1980.43 “Ship TWILIGHT” by William Bradford, 1854 “The framed painting shows the ship TWILIGHT from the port side, full rigged, under full sail, and flying the Phillips house and American flags. The seas are rough and very blue with a puffy clouded sky. Dumpling Rock Lighthouse is at the right, and two men are in a small two-masted boat in the left foreground. The water and the small boat likely are by Bradfords mentor, Albert Van Beest.” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 93 219
  • NBWM #1975.18 “The Port of New Bedford from Crow Island” by William Bradford, 1854 “Also known as ‘New Bedford Harbor from Fairhaven’… As his observation point, Bradford used Crow Island, a short distance from the Fairhaven shore and just south of the New Bedford-Fairhaven Bridge. To the left is Fairhaven where at Union Wharf, a ship is hove down for a crew of shipwrights to replace her copper.” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 98 220
  • NBWM #1984.20 “Bark J. D. THOMPSON” by William Bradford, 1855 “This ship portrait is of the Bark J. D. THOMPSON at anchor in New Bedford Harbor…” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 94 221
  • NBWM #1946.20.1 “Whaleship NORTHERN LIGHT” by William Bradford, 1855 222
  • NBWM #1934.6.1 Bark VIGILANT by William Bradford “The bark VIGILANT is shown starboard view at anchor with sails furled. Fort Phoenix is at the left horizon while sloops, a schooner, two large vessels, and Palmers Island Light are on the right.” (NBWM records) 223
  • NBWM #1990.1.3 Whaleship SYREN QUEEN of Fairhaven by William Bradford Gift of Elizabeth D. Belshaw and Barbara D. Clemons William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 92 224
  • NBWM #1998.43 JIREH SWIFT by William Bradford Gift of Sally Swift in memory of Stephen Hathaway Swift “This ship portrait of the whaler JIREH SWIFT shows her at anchor in New Bedford harbor in September of 1853… Clarks Point Light is in the right background while Dumpling Rock is in the distance.” (NBWM records) William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas by Director Emeritus Richard C. Kugler, © 2003 New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 90 225
  • NBWM #2000.34 Ship YOUNG HECTOR by William Bradford “YOUNG HECTOR setting studding sails inbound off Dumpling Light with what is probably a pilot schooner astern.” (NBWM records) 226
  • NBWM #2005.20 “Hove to for a Pilot” by William Bradford “Homeward bound whale ship in Vineyard Sound with Gay Head lighthouse, Marthas Vineyard in the background.” 227
  • “Ship CHARLES W. MORGAN at a New Bedford Wharf” by Clifford Warren Ashley, 1925 New Bedford Whaling Museum #2001.100.4349The CHARLES W. MORGAN was owned byEdward Mott Robinson, the husband ofAbby Howland and father of Hetty Green. 228
  • NBWM #1923.36 “WANDERER Breaking Out Oil” by Clifford Warren Ashley 229
  • “Stripping the WANDERER” by Clifford Warren Ashley, 1923 New Bedford Whaling Museum #1977.23.1 WANDERER“Last whaling ship to sail from New Bedford. OnWanderers last voyage (1924), the vessel anchoredoff Marthas Vineyard to wait out an approachingstorm. During the night the anchor let go and theship was ultimately destroyed on the rocks.”http://www.mattapoisetthistoricalsociety.org/whalingships_history.htm 230
  • Artist: R. Swain Gifford, 1899 NBWM #2001.100.4656 “Port Clarence, Alaska” R. Swain Gifford was another Fairhaven artist. He worked in NY with Albert VanBeest who collaborated on several paintings with William Bradford. His daughter Rose married Russell Grinnell in 1900 (slide 540). Russell won the 1928 Bermuda Race and became president of Grinnell Sprinkler in Providence, which was founded by his father, Frederick (slides 3 & 526+). https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/201740/ 231
  • Artist: Lemuel D. Eldred, 1900 NBWM #1981.50.2 “Oxford Point, Fairhaven” “This view of Oxford Point at Fairhaven shows a low rocky beach in the right foreground. The smooth water leads to a cluster of buildings on the point of land to the right. A two-story white tower which was C. H. Giffords studio is seen above the roof lines.” (NBWM records) Lemuel Eldred was a protégé of William Bradford and painted in his studio on Union Wharf. Eldred purchased his master’s studio around the time of his death in 1892 and moved it to this part of Fairhaven. https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/201735/ 232
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #1936.60.25 “Off Fort Phoenix” by William Bradford Fairhaven was originally part of Dartmouth. It separated from New Bedford in 1812. 233
  • NBWM #1965.94.2 Fort Phoenix Beach One block from Bradford’s harbor-side home on Fort Street 234
  • New Bedford Whaling Museum #2003.36 “Wilburs Point, Sconticut Neck, Fairhaven” by William Bradford 235
  • “Funeral of Mr. Bradford” (cont.) Photographer: Joseph S. Martin NBWM #2000.100.85.364 Rogers School, Fairhaven Given by H. H. Rogers, friend of William Bradford “The floral tribute by Mr. Henry H. Rogers to the memory of his friend William Bradford…”Fairhaven Star from Millicent Library Archives 236
  • Photographer: Joseph S. Martin NBWM #2000.100.85.374 Fairhaven High School Gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers, friend of William Bradford Henry Huttleston Rogers donated several buildings to the Town of Fairhaven where he was born. He also donated the Commercial Bank Building in New Bedford to the Old Dartmouth Historical Society (slide 249) and the Center School in Mattapoisett (slide 246). 237
  • NBWM #2000.100.47 Henry Huttleson Rogers 1840-1909http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Huttleston_Rogers Photographer: Norman Fortier NBWM #2004.11.19541.1 Millicent Library, Fairhaven, gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers Henry Rogers was a close friend of Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), who visited him often in Fairhaven. Clemens spoke at the dedication of the Town Hall across the street from the library on Feb. 22, 1894. This hand-written speech now hangs on the library wall near Rogers’ desk from Standard Oil with the Mark Twain plaque and Bierstadt painting in the next slide. 238
  • Owned by Millicent Library http://www.millicentlibrary.org/msimon.htm “Martha Simon” by Albert Bierstadt“Martha Simon was the last of the Native Americans in Fairhaven. She was a Wampanoag…This painting is by Albert Bierstadt—a departure for him from the panoramic landscapes of theWest for which he is best known. He presented the painting to Henry Huttleston Rogers…”Mark Twain Plaque in Millicent LibraryHenry Huttleston Rogers: Portrait of a “Capitalist” by Earl J. Dias, pg. 44 239
  • NBWM Research Library Rogers’ Mansion across Fort St. from William Bradford’s Home Rogers and Bradford originally had older homes in the town center, and this mansion was built shortly after Bradford died. Like Bierstadt’s “Martha Simon”, at least one grand Bradford painting must have hung here or in Rogers’ New York mansion [research needed]. When he died on May 19, 1909, Rogers’ New York Times obituary stated the following: “Henry Huttleston Rogers, one of the foremost of the country’s captains of industry, and a notable figure for many years in financial and corporation development in this country, died suddenly at his home, 3 East Seventy- eighth Street… As to his fortune, the estimates of Wall Street men varied yesterday from $50,000,000 to $75,000,000.” (slide 262) 240
  • Creator: Bloomingdale, Harry NBWM #1981.33.15 Philanthropist Henry H. Rogers Summer Mansion “Rogers Mansion - built by Henry H. Rogers in 1895, featured 85 rooms and 18 bedrooms, it was torn down in 1915 at the request of Henrys son Harry.” Rogers’ best man was a Cornelius Grinnell (1839-1922) of Fairhaven, who was also Rogers’ brother-in-law (slide 263). In addition to being his best man, this Cornelius Grinnell worked at Standard Oil, NY with Rogers. 241
  • Unitarian Memorial Church Gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers (continued from previous slide) “’Hell Hound’ Rogers was the son of Rowland and Mary Eldridge (Huttleston) Rogers, both of early New England ancestry… He was born at Mattapoisett, Mass., but was brought up at Fairhaven, near by, where in boyhood he carried newspapers and delivered groceries. He later served for a time as a railroad brakeman and baggage-man. He was twenty-one when the newly discovered oil fields in Pennsylvania drew fortune seekers to that region. Rogers and a friend, Charles P. Ellis, went together to the Oil City district, each having about $600 in savings. They presently built a small refinery at a cost of $1,800, borrowing the additional funds necessary.” from the Dictionary of American Biography, 1935 http://www.millicentlibrary.org/hhr-dab.htmPhotographer: Joseph TirrellNBWM #2000.100.85.366 242
  • Fairhaven Town Hall Gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers “On a visit to his home town in 1862, Rogers was married to Abbie Palmer Gifford. In Pennsylvania he met several men destined to become leaders in the oil industry, among them Charles Pratt who in 1866 asked Rogers to become associated with him in his refinery business in Brooklyn. There Rogers devised the machinery by which naphtha was first successfully separated from the crude oil-an epochal invention for the industry (Current Literature, July 1909). A patent (No.120,-539) was granted on Oct. 31, 1871. When the Rockefellers organized the Standard Oil Company in 1874, they took over the Pratt business and with it Rogers, now recognized as both an expert oil man and an able executive with a genius for organization. He was made chairman of the manufacturing committee of the new corporation, a little later a trustee, and before 1890 he was vice-president. He conceived the idea of long pipe lines for transporting oil, and organized the National Transit Company, the first corporation with such an object.” from the Dictionary of American Biography, 1935 http://www.millicentlibrary.org/hhr-dab.htmPhotographer: Joseph S. Martin NBWM #2000.100.85.375 243
  • Unitarian Memorial Church Fairhaven Gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers Henry H. Rogers, Mark Twain, & Booker T. Washington “Known but to a very few, through Booker T. Washington, "Hell Hound Rogers" was a secret philanthropist, encouraging the Negro educator and aiding in his educational efforts for African Americans by deploying a new concept which came to be known as anonymous donor matching funds to contribute very large amounts of money in support of several teacher’s colleges (now Hampton University and Tuskegee University) and literally dozens of small schools in the South over the 15 year period of the Twain-Rogers friendship. Dr. Washington only revealed this situation in June 1909 just weeks after Rogers death as he made a pre-planned tour along the Virginian Railway, traveling in Rogers private rail car…to improve race relations and economic conditions for African Americans along the route of the new railway.” The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 10, page 122, U. of Illinois Press. http://en.wikipedia.org 244
  • Unitarian Memorial Church Harrop Center Gift of Henry Huttleston Rogers http://www.danamorris.net/Church/memorialchurchindex.html 245
  • Center School, Mattapoisett Gift of Henry Huttleston RogersRogers’ father was born in Mattapoisett, next to Fairhaven. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Huttleston_Rogers 246
  • Philanthropist Henry Huttleston Rogers & Helen Keller Dedicated to Henry H. Rogers by Helen Keller Millicent Library Collection 247
  • Helen Keller’s Inscription to Mrs. Rogers“In May 1896, at the home in New York City of editor- essayist Laurence Hutton, Rogers and Mark Twain first saw Helen Keller, thensixteen years old. Although she had been made blind and mute by illness as a young child, she had been reached by her teacher-companion, Anne Sullivan. When she was 20, Keller passed with distinction the entrance examination to Radcliffe College [Harvard].Twain praised “this marvelous child” and hoped that Helen would not be forced to retire from her studies because of poverty. He urgedthe Rogers to aid Keller and to solicit other Standard Oil chiefs to help her. The Rogers paid for her education at Radcliffe andarranged a monthly stipend. Keller dedicated her book, The World I Live In, To Henry H. Rogers, my Dear Friend of Many Years. Onthe fly leaf of Rogers copy, she wrote, To Mrs. Rogers: The best world I live in is the kindness of friends like you and Mr. Rogers.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Huttleston_Rogers#Helen_Keller.27s_education H. H. Rogers was by far the most successful industrialist and greatest philanthropist to come out of the Old Dartmouth area. 248
  • New Bedford Bank of Commerce (First Building of the Whaling Museum) Photographer: Charles S. Baylies NBWM #2000.100.48.5 (detail) Given by H. H. Rogers to the Old Dartmouth Historical Society, 1906The “Bedford Bank” was founded by Cornelius Grinnell, John Howland, Isaac Howland, Jr., etc. in 1803. Today, theWattles Family Gallery occupies the first floor. In the foyer are the above marble tablets to Henry Rogers and brass plaquesto Cornelius Grinnell, several Howlands, and others (slide 422). Upon entering the gallery, William Bradford’s famousSealers Crushed by Icebergs is facing the visitor (slide 152). Thus, the two most famous people to come out of Fairhaven,the robber baron and the artist, became friends & neighbors and are honored in the same geographical location. As will berelated, Cornelius Grinnell was an almost forgotten Dartmouth patriot and founder of an international shipping dynasty. 249
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell Revolutionary War Soldier, Ship Captain, and BankerCornelius was captured by the British and never promoted beyond private. After the war, he was captain of the ships REBECCA, BEDFORD,MARY, and others (?). He was an owner of sixteen New Bedford registered ships and a founder of Fish & Grinnell and Grinnell, Minturn & Co. The below plaque is in the bank building given by Henry Huttleston Rogers to the Old Dartmouth Historical Society (NBWM). Cornelius was a director of the Bedford Bank when it opened as the first bank in New Bedford in 1803. In Jan. 1804, he was a founding partner of Howland & Grinnell with his brother-in-law, Capt. William Howland; and he was a founding director of the Bedford Marine Insurance Co. in 1805. After closing its doors during the War of 1812, the Bedford Bank was re-opened as the Bedford Commercial bank in 1816; and Capt. Cornelius continued as a director from 1816 to 1831. His brother-in-law Capt. John H. Howland was also a director of the bank & the insurance company, and James Howland was a director of the Bedford Marine Ins. Co. Capt. Cornelius was an incorporator of the New Bedford Institution for Savings when it opened on Aug. 15, 1825. In Cuffee Muster Roll about the famous black Capt. Paul Cuffee, Professor Lamont Thomas stated: “The government of Massachusetts was desperately in need of money and they were taxing all the families in Dartmouth, Mass., a very poor community.” (PBS History Detectives, 2004 #10) This visual history should demonstrate how parts of Old Dartmouth was transformed into a very affluent community by the whaling industry during the lives of Cornelius and Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell. Plaque at Water St. entrance to Wattles Family Gallery, NBWM 250
  • Creator: Joseph S. Martin NBWM #2000.100.85.317 Rogers Building Exhibit, c. 1931“The history of the National Bank of Commerce is of peculiar interest. In 1803 the towns business had increased sufficiently to warrant the establishmentof a bank and the Bedford Bank was incorporated with a capital of $60,000… In 1812 the old charter had expired and as the country was at war withEngland, the state of the business was deemed too precarious for the institution to carry on its business transactions… Among the first directors were JohnHowland, Cornelius Crinnell, William Rotch, Jr., and Thomas Nye. There was no bank in New Bedford for an internal for four years, but in 1816 theBedford Commercial Bank was established with a capital of $100,000… Ricketson was elected as cashier at an annual salary of $599, and John AveryParker, Cornelius, Grinnell, Gideon Howland, George Howland, Seth Russell Jr., were chosen directors, with George Howland their president.” New Bedford, Massachusetts: Its History Industries, Institutions, and Attractions: by Pease, Hough, & Sawyer, 1889 251
  • NBWM #1988.6.401 Rogers Building, Whaling Artifact Gallery c. 1931“The old bank building was a quaint affair with subterranean vaults to defy would be burglars. George Howland was president until his death in 1851, when, EdwardMott Robinson was elected to the position. He served until 1860 when Thomas Nye, Jt. Succeeded him. Thomas S. Hathaway held the office from 1869 to 1878, andFrancis Hathaway held the office from 1878 on. The Bedford Commercial bank was organized as the National Bank of Commerce on December 19, 1864. By 1874 theircapital stock was one million dollars and they had a surplus of $200,000. Their imposing building was erected in 1883 and was constructed by brick and brownstone…” New Bedford, Massachusetts: Its History Industries, Institutions, and Attractions: by Pease, Hough, & Sawyer, 1889 252
  • Creator: Allen, James W. NBWM #1987.26.75.a William Bradford’s Home 16 Fort Street This view looks the same today.William Bradford Sailing Ships & Arctic Seas , R. C. Kugler, p. 42 253
  • Pearce Collection NBWM #2009.2.87 “Fairhaven, along the shore from the Fort” This is the tower on the Italianate Victorian house next to the Bradford’s. Fort Phoenix is out of the picture on the far right. 254
  • Rogers Bradford Roger’s Mansion & Bradford’s HomeWilliam’s wife lived here until she died in 1907, and his daughter lived here until she died in 1940. They were both named Mary. 255
  • Photo: Millicent LibraryWilliam Bradford’s Rogers’ Summer Estate, Fort Phoenix Fort St. Home http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Huttleston_Rogers 1888-1892 millicentlibrary.org/hhrogers.htm http://henryhrogers.blogspot.com/ 256
  • Future Site of Map of Fairhaven, 1895 Rogers’ Summer Estate Unitarian Memorial ChurchTown Hall Millicent Library Bradford’s Studio Mary Bradford’s Home Fort Phoenix Location of Brass Plaque William died in 1892 http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/8009/Fair+Haven/Bristol+County+1895/Massachusetts/ 257
  • Photographer: Unknown NBWM #1984.34.7 “Women in a Field with Fort Phoenix Beacon in Background” This photo was taken near William Bradford’s home. Henry Huttleston Roger’s daughter Clara gave Ft. Phoenix to the town. 258
  • Photographer: John S. Johnston Library of Congress LC-D4-62119 “KANAWHA, Glencove, N.Y.Y.C” Owned by H. H. Rogers: 200 ft., 471-ton“Rogers was a developer of coal and railroad properties in West Virginia along the Kanawha River… Manned by a crew of 39 people, Kanawha was often compared by the newspapers of the day to the North Star, the yacht of a member of the Vanderbilt family.” http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/det1994019038/PP/ 259
  • Photographer: Tirrell, Joseph NBWM #2000.100.85.359 KANAWHA Passing Fort Phoenix Clara Broughton, Henry Rogers’ daughter, donated Fort Phoenix to the town in 1926; and it is now a park. 260
  • On the Yacht KANAWHA Rogers and Mark Twain The black man in the photo was probably a pilot who had been brought aboard in Jamaica. Rogers’ letters show that Booker T. Washington went out on his yacht when he visited Fairhaven. Unfortunately, very few photos of Rogers have survived; and most of his personal records were destroyed. “Henry H. Rogers purchased the Kanawha, then the fastest steam yacht in American waters, from John P. Duncan in April 1901. White and gleaming, it became a familiar sight in Fairhaven harbor – 227 feet in length, with two engines, a high, sharp clipper bow, and a forward Twain deck notable for its lavish dining quarters. Rogers used the yacht for his frequent trips from New York to his 85-room Fairhaven mansion and for many cruises along the New England coast and in theRogers Caribbean – with Mark Twain…[frequently a guest].” A Pictorial History of Fairhaven, by Joseph D. Thomas & Marsha McCabe, Spinner Publications, http://spinnerpub.com/Spinner_Photos.html http://www.twainquotes.com/TwainRogersVA.html Mark Twain to Rogers, March 4, 1894: “You have served me and my family from ruin and humiliation. You have been to me the best friend a man ever had, and yet you have never by any word made me feel the weight of this deep obligation.” Following by Prof. Earl J. Dias in Henry Huttleston Rogers, Portrait of a Capitalist, 1974: “Unquestionably, the most famous friend in the long list of Rogers’ boon companions was Samuel L. Clemens… Rogers and Clemens enjoyed a companionship that extended over a period of sixteen years – from 1893 to Rogers’ death in 1909. A mass of correspondence between the two men is available in Mark Twains’s Correspondence with Henry Huttleston Rogers, edited by Lewis Leary and published in 1969 by the University of California Press.” Photo: Millicent Library MARK TWAIN Day by Day vol. III 1897-1904 261
  • Henry Huttleston Rogers’ NY Mansion No. 3 East 78th Street “Edmund Converse commissioned mansion architect C. P. H. Gilbert to design his new home... When construction was completed in 1900, Converse’s five-and-a-half story residence looked somewhat out of place on the mostly-undeveloped block. It would not be alone for long. Within the next few years the marble and limestone mansions would line the block, making it one of the most prestigious residential streets in the city. The Converse family was here only a few years before Henry Huttleston Rogers purchased the house.” http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/search?q=henry+huttleston+rogers res=9B02E3D8153EE733A25753C2A9639C946897D6CF 262
  • William BradfordGreenland Boulder http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091105/PUB01/911050375 Rogers Mausoleum Photo: New Bedford Standard-Times Bradford, Grinnell, & Rogers Riverside Cemetery, Fairhaven Left: H.H. Rogers & Cornelius Grinnell: Brothers-in-Law The above Cornelius Grinnell (1839-1922), buried to the right of William Bradford’s boulder, was a son of Cornelius, Sr. (1799-) and a grand nephew of Henry Grinnell. He married Sarah Gifford, who was a sister of Abbie Gifford (wife of Henry Huttleston Rogers). Henry Huttleston Rogers: Portrait of a “Capitalist” by Earl J. Dias, p. 52 263
  • Fort PhoenixPhoto: Millicent Library ML 0028 http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinnerpub/3346285691/ View from roof of Rogers’ Summer Mansion William Bradford’s home is the next one to the right after the Victorian tower (barely visible). Being an industrialist, Rogers thoroughly enjoyed his panoramic view of the mills and smokestacks. 264
  • Photo: Bierstadt Brothers NBWM #1940.21.3 “Fort Phoenix, Civil War Era” 265
  • Creator: Bradford, William NBWM #1990.23.11 “Shed left, open boat in foreground…” 266
  • NBWM #2006.36.58 “Kelly Marine, boatyard buildings, taken from street” 267
  • “Fishing schooner DELIA C. SMITH in dry dock at Fairhaven” NBWM #2008.31.17 268
  • Photographer: Willis, Henry P. NBWM #2000.100.440 “Schooners at Old South Wharf, Fairhaven” These are the wharfs and ships that William Bradford observed and worked around his entire life. 269
  • Creator: Ashley, Clifford W. NBWM #1974.3.1.181 Fairhaven Waterfront - SUNBEAM 270
  • Creator: Ashley, Clifford W. NBWM #1973.37.19.39 CHARLES W. MORGAN Union Wharf, Fairhaven, where Bradford had his studio. New Bedford in background. 271
  • Creator: Ashley, Clifford W. NBWM #1973.37.19.34 CHARLES W. MORGAN on Railway, Fairhaven Near where William Bradford had his studio on Union Wharf. 272
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN on the Ways Fairhaven Creator: Ashley, Clifford W. NBWM #1973.37.19.35The CHARLES W. MORGAN was a Howland ship; andone of the owners was Edward M. Robinson, thehusband of Abby Howland and father of Hetty Green. http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbein00emer 273
  • Creator: Ashley, Clifford W. NBWM #1973.37.19.35 CHARLES W. MORGAN on Marine Railway, Fairhaven 274
  • Creator: ONeil, John NBWM #2000.100.3795.2 “Steel schooner yacht hauled at Fairhaven” [SEA FOX ?] 275
  • NBWM #1992.39.82“Whaling bark WANDERER on the ways in Fairhaven” 276
  • NBWM #2006.36.58Kelly Marine, boatyard buildings, Fairhaven 277
  • Creator: Allen, James W. NBWM #2000.100.1217 SACHEM Giffords Railway in Fairhaven 278
  • NBWM #1979.52.82TAMERLANE 279
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #1979.52.15 JULDI MALLA II 280
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook (attributed) NBWM #2008.31.17 “Sailboat on the ways at Pierce & Kilburn Boatyard, Fairhaven” 281
  • Creator: Topham, R. R NBWM #2009.2.54 “Peter Johnsons boat, Fairhaven Ferry Slip” Railway terminal and train in background. 282
  • Schooner and Steamer ISLAND HOME off Fort Phoenix 283
  • Photographer: Henry P. Willis NBWM #2000.100.363.71 “Schooner Passing Through Draw” New Bedford – Fairhaven bridge: July 4, 1888 284
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.157 “CHARLES W. MORGAN, drying sail-Pier 3” New Bedford – Fairhaven Bridge in background. 285
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.304 “CHARLES W. MORGAN, Rigger at work on bowsprit & jib boom” New Bedford – Fairhaven Bridge in background. 286
  • NBWM #1988.6.145 “Acushnet River looking east from New Bedford towards Fairhaven” 287
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.804 CHARLES W. MORGAN and tug J. T. SHERMAN 288
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN“Drying sails at Wests Boathouse” Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.88 289
  • NBWM #2000.100.566 Bark CANTON “Bark CANTON, oldest whaler afloat. Built at Baltimore, 1835. Baltimore Packet for 8 years; ran between Baltimore, Maryland and Liverpool, England. Purchased by C.R. Tucker & Co. of New Bedford and fitted for whaling. Sailed as a whale ship July 29, 1845. CANTON seen here in New Bedford wharf with Fairhaven skyline visible across the harbor.” 290
  • NBWM #2000.100.500 Bark ALICE KNOWLES “Bark ALICE KNOWLES of New Bedford at foreground left… In background is the skyline of Fairhaven…” 291
  • Creator: Ashley, Edmund Davis NBWM #2000.100.3481 “Bark PLATINA just in” Bradford’s Fairhaven in Background 292
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.164 “WANDERER - drying sail - Pier 3” 293
  • MORNING STAR“Catboat ECLIPSE of Edgartown, Massachusetts sits in front ofbark MORNING STAR at left. Catboats WAIF and CORINNE atright at wharf. Fairhaven center can be seen across the harbor.” NBWM #1998.64.11 294
  • “WANDERER drying sail, stern view” Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #1991.42.20 CHARLES W. MORGAN was a Howland ship; and one of the owners was Edward M. Robinson, the husband of Abby Howland and father of Hetty Green. It will be visiting New Bedford in 2014 and is the subject of Chapter VIII, slide 621. 295
  • “WANDERER drying canvas” Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.713 296
  • NBWM #1983.42.73CHARLES W. MORGAN dressed as WANDERER “Down to the Sea in Ships” 297
  • Creator: Willis, Henry P. NBWM #2000.100.363.2 “View of New Bedford, foot of Middle Street” 298
  • Sailing DayCreator: Clifford W. Ashley NBWM #1974.3.1.15 Fairhaven in background. 299
  • Creator: Albert Cook Church NBWM #2000.100.86.158 “CHARLES W. MORGAN at anchor” 300
  • Creator: Albert Cook Church NBWM #2000.100.86.176 “WANDERER Passing Fort Phoenix” A gable end & several chimneys of Henry Huttleston’s mansion are barely visible over the stern. Fort Phoenix is to left of tug. 301
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.160 CHARLES W. MORGAN 302
  • •  Capt. Alexander Winsor House •  Captain of the FLYING CLOUD, 1854 •  10 William Street, Fairhaven, built 1835 Creator: J. E. Reed NBWM #1996.21.41 •  Alexander Winsor of Fairhaven Grinnell, Minturn & Co. purchased the record-breaking FLYING CLOUD while it was being built by Donald McKay in 1851 (Chapter VI, slide 504). Chapter V (slide 404) relates how Capt. Cornelius Grinnell & Cornelius, Jr. founded the companies that evolved into Fish, Grinnell & Co. and Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Alexander Winsor became captain of the FLYING CLOUD in 1854.Photos by Jay Grinnell http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Cloud_(clipper) 303
  • Chapter IV. Scrimshaw: Gifts from Weston Howland & FamilyNBWM #1948.30.23R 304
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1948.30.52A 305
  • Scrimshaw Collection Gift of Weston Howland NBWM #1948.30.283 306
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1948.30.500 In below exhibit. Senior Curator Stuart Frank, Ph.D. 307
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM“Gift of Weston Howland (1895-1959. A descendantof whaling masters and namesake grandson of theinventor of the original process for refining petroleumoil, he was a textile industry executive who donatedhundreds of scrimshaw objects to several maritimemuseums in the 1940s and 50s.” pg. xiiiIngenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshawin the New Bedford Whaling Museum by Dr. Stuart M.Frank, 2012, pg. 256 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances- curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html NBWM #1948.30.555 308
  • Scrimshaw Collection Gift of Weston Howland NBWM #1948.30.37 NBWM #1948.30.37 Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum: Dr. Stuart M. Frank, 2012, pg. 104 309
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.37 310
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.36V 311
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.36RFrank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, 2012, pg. 132, Fig: 8:3 312
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.37RFrank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved:Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 130http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 313
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.14Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved:Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 139http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 314
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.27Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved:Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 136http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 315
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.35Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 80http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 316
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.2Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museumhttp://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 317
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.34A 318
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.34 319
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.36R 320
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.36V 321
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.4R 322
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.4V 323
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.33 324
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.33 325
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1948.30.22 326
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.7R 327
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.13R-1 328
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.15V 329
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.8 330
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1948.30.11R-1 331
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.19 332
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.3 333
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.246 334
  • Weston Howland Collection NBWM #1948.30.17R 335
  • Weston Howland Collection NBWM #1948.30.25R 336
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM Weston Howland CollectionNBWM #1948.30.32V 337
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.11R-3 338
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.32 339
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.16V 340
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.17V 341
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.16V 342
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.9Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved:Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 111http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 343
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM (600+ objects)NBWM #1948.30.25V 344
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1962.4.1 345
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.10 346
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.5 347
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWM NBWM #1948.30.32R 348
  • Weston Howland Collection, NBWMNBWM #1948.30.271 349
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionFrank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 287http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html NBWM #1948.30.558 350
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Spire swiftNBWM #1948.30.272 351
  • Scrimshaw Collection Gift of Weston Howland NBWM #1948.30.489Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved:Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, Fig. 11:96http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 352
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.522 353
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.52A 354
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.554A 355
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.210 356
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.380A 357
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.377A 358
  • Weston Howland Collection “Lattice-work pan bone work box”NBWM #1948.30.286 Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, Fig. 11:20 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 359
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.289 360
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.373 Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 217 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 361
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.370A 362
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.374 363
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.371 364
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.59 “crimper / jagging wheel” 365
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.69 “crimper / jagging wheel” 366
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.71 367
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.66 368
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.77 369
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 207 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.83 “Crimper with two stationary blades. At a mere 4 ½ “ (11.4 cm) this is an outstanding piece, carved out of a single whale tooth.” Dr. Stuart Frank 370
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.254 371
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.68 372
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.62 373
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.70 374
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.72 375
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.78 376
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.76 377
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.74 378
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.81 379
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.89 380
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.204 According to Dr. Frank, the building on the left is the Providence Arcade, designed by Russell Warren (slides 461, 587, & 673) & James Buckland and built in 1828. On the right is Manning Hall at Brown University that was designed by James Buckland and built in 1834. Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 86 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.html 381
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.215 382 NBWM #1948.30.205
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.216 NBWM #1948.30.217 383
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.266 384
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg.179 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.249A 385
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.246 386
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.252 387
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 181 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.265 388
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 186 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.267 389
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 207 http://www.whalingmuseumstore.org/ingenious-contrivances-curiously-carved-scrimshaw-in-the-new-bedford.htmlNBWM #1948.30.182 390
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection (660+ Objects)NBWM #1948.30.254 391
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.365 392
  • Weston Howland Collection NBWM #1948.30.492 393
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw Collection NBWM #1948.30.486X 394
  • Weston Howland Scrimshaw CollectionNBWM #1948.30.361 395
  • Double-cage Swift made by Capt. William Howland NBWM #1945.39 Frank, Stuart: Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, pg. 283The Capt. William Howland, who made this swift,was a son of Capt. Gilbert Howland (1772 -1857).Gilbert was a nephew of Sylvia (Howland)Grinnell and first cousin of Henry, Moses, Joseph,etc. (Emery, Wm.: The Howland Heirs, #593). 396
  • NBWM #1973.28 Arctic sledge/sled Scrimshaw given by Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr.NBWM #1948.30.4R “Walrus ivory images of Arctic fauna carved by Inuits” 397
  • NBWM #1979.49 “Off Grand Manan” by William Bradford, c. 1860 Gift of Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr.Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr. also gave the 1845-1848 logbook of the GEORGE & SUSAN and the1852-1855 logbook of theJAVA. This was the name given to the first Concordia Yawl built/produced by Waldo & Llewellyn, Jr. (slide 544). These brotherswere great, great, grandsons of Capt. Cornelius Howland, who was a brother of Sylvia Grinnell (slides 420, 440, & 714). 398
  • NBWM #1979.3.2“Summer Woods” by William Allen WallGift of Llewellyn Howland, Jr. 399
  • Gift of Llewellyn Howland, Jr. NBWM #1979.3.1 “Autumn Woods” by William Allen Wall, c. 1865 Given in Memory of Hope Waldo Howland Peter Grinnell and Llewellyn Howland were both descendants of Gideon Howland (1734-1823), and it probably was not a coincidence that they gave their William A. Wall paintings to the Whaling Museum in the same year (1979). The close relationship between the Grinnells & Howland will be examined in Chapter V. 400
  • NBWM #1979.53.2“Woodland Pond”by William A. Wall, c. 1870 Gift of Peter S. Grinnell . 401
  • NBWM# 1979.53.1 “Nonquitt Beach” by William Allen Wall, c. 1870 Gift of Peter S. GrinnellPeter & Mary Lou gave the GRINNELL RESOLUTE DESK 402
  • Gift of Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1979.54 “View of New Bedford from Fairhaven” by William Allen Wall, c. 1848 This painting came from the collection of Peter & Mary Lou Grinnell; and it is now in storage near Cornelius Grinnell’s brass plaque and the GRINNELL RESOLUTE DESK, which they also gave. . https://www.1000museums.com/search.php?af=william+allen+wall 403
  • Chapter IV. Grinnell & Howland Old Dartmouth Roots Creator: Unknown Sylvia Howland Captain Cornelius Grinnell 1765-1837 1758-1850 Quaker, 34 Grandchildren “Master Mariner and Merchant” Gift of Helen Grinnell King, NBWM #2011.3.21 Gift of Helen Grinnell King, NBWM #2011.3.1Cornelius was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and a ship captain, ship owner, and banker. He and Sylvia had nine children.Among their many achievements, sons Joseph & Moses were U. S. Congressmen; and Cornelius, Jr. was a state representative. 404
  • Gift of Mrs. Abram Taber NBWM: #1904.87 “Howland House At Round Hill” by William Allen Wall, 1870 Birthplace of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell and four preceding generations of Howlands 405
  • Benjamin Howland Gideon Howland Gideon Howland, Jr. Cornelius & Sylvia HettyCornelius, Jr. Joseph Henry Moses Green Extended chart by James Grinnell, Jr. (slide 701) This digital family history was inspired by two remarkable Old Dartmouth people, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell (1758-1850) and Sylvia Howland (1767-1837) and the contributions their family made to New Bedford, New York, and world-wide commerce and industry from the Revolutionary War to the 1880’s. Cornelius and Sylvia married in 1785, and their family evolved into several very successful business partnerships and international fame and fortune for a few. As can be seen in the above chart, Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell was a sister of Gideon Howland (Jr.). With Isaac Howland, Jr., Gideon, Jr. founded a fortune that was passed down and multiplied by Hetty Green (far right). 406
  • Gift of Llewellyn Howland, Jr. NBWM #1979.3.3 Ship EUPHRATES, by Montardier, 1828 Built for and owned by Grinnells & Howlands from 1809 to1865. Written on back: “Cornelius Grinnell to his Nephew Corn’l Howland 1848.” (slide 409)In 1979 Peter Grinnell & Llewellyn Howland, Jr. gave five William A. Wall paintings (slides 399-403) to the WhalingMuseum. In 1979, Llewellyn, Jr. also gave the above painting of a ship owned by Grinnells & Howlands (next slide). 407
  • Ship EUPHRATES Joseph Grinnell was the surveyor when this ship was built in 1809. He was just 21, and his success at this important position resulted in his uncle, Capt. John Howland, taking him to New York in 1810 and making him a junior partner in several ships. Through the ownership and management of many ships like the EUPHRATES, Joseph, his father, three of his brothers and many of his relatives became very wealthy men. This wealth enabled Henry to become a major contributor to six Arctic expeditions, and most of the Howland owners on the left were Henry’s uncles or cousins. In fact, the EUPHRATES was owned by the extended Grinnell-Howland family from the time it was built in 1809 until it was burned by the Confederate raider SHENANDOAH on June 22, 1865. Even after the nefarious Captain Waddell of the SHENANDOAH learned on June 23, 1865 that the Civil War had ended, he captured or sank twenty-one additional Union vessels (slides 517 & 518). Capt. Cornelius Grinnell was an owner of the EUPHRATES from 1809 until he died in 1850; and his friend, in-law, and partner (Capt. Preserved Fish) was an owner from 1809 to 1815. In addition to many New York ships, Henry Grinnell owned the following New Bedford ships: SARAH (#2829), BRIGHTON (#330), CORNELIA (#664), GEORGE WASHINGTON (#1226), & EUPHRATES (#979). Henry Grinnell became an owner of the EUPHRATES in 1842 and remained an owner until it was sunk in 1865 (left). The Grinnells & Howlands were owners of this ship and many others in New Bedford and New York. The EUPHRATES was one of the 59 New Bedford ships owned by Capt. Cornelius Grinnell and his offspring. One source states that they also owned or leased at least 55 ships in New York.Ship Registers of New Bedford NBWM Research Library 408
  • Photo: Michael Lapides NBWM #1979.3.3 “Cornelius Grinnell to his Nephew Corn’l Howland 1848” (Written on back of EUPHRATES painting) Capt. Cornelius died in 1850 (slide 501) Map of Grinnell Homes Cornelius Howland, Jr. lived at 382 County St. (slide 605) across the street from Joseph Grinnell (No. 5). The estates of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. (No. 4) and Joseph (No. 5) originally included all the land encompassed by County, Bedford, Orchard, and Hawthorn Streets. Ancestry of the Grinnell Family was funded by descendants of Frederick Grinnell (1836-1905), who invented the Grinnell Automatic Sprinkler (slide 526). He was a great grandson of Capt. Cornelius and Sylvia and lived in the Joseph Grinnell Mansion from 1894-1905. He also owned the schooner yacht QUICKSTEP (slide 528). Ancestry of the Grinnell Family, by Wm. Emery, 1931 409
  • NBWM #1982.39.2 NBWM #1982.39.1 Patriotic Embroidery by Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell Given by Mrs. Peter S. Grinnell “She married in May, 1785, Captain Cornelius Grinnell, son of Daniel and Grace (Palmer) Grinnell, born in Little Compton Feb. 11, 1758 and died in New Bedford April 19, 1850, aged ninety-two years. To her lovely character and steady discharge of duty her [9] children were in no small degree indebted for the success and honors at which they arrived.” (The Howland Heirs by Wm. Emery) Sylvia Howland was the sister of Capt. Cornelius Howland (1758-1835), who was captured by the British with Cornelius Grinnell. After the Revolutionary War, Cornelius Grinnell was commissioned first mate on the famous whaling ship REBECCA when it was launched in 1785. This was the same year that Cornelius Grinnell married Cornelius Howlands sister, Sylvia. Note: the letters “i” and “y” were used interchangeably. Unfortunately, very little women’s history of this time was recorded and saved; and they did not have the legal right of ownership. 410
  • Old Commons Burial Ground Little Compton, Massachusetts & Rhode Island Little Compton was part of Dartmouth until 1747.* Joseph Church II, 1662-1715 Joseph Church, 1638-1711 Married: Grace Shaw Married: Mary Tucker, 1660 Cornelius’s Great Grandparents Cornelius’s Great, Great Grandparents*“In 1682, the town was incorporated by the Plymouth Colony and renamed Little Compton… By 1747, Little Compton secured itsown royal decree and was annexed to Newport County as a part of Rhode Island along with Tiverton and Bristol. Because LittleCompton was once part of the Plymouth colony, all probate and land records prior to 1746 can be found in Taunton and New Bedford.” http://www.little-compton.com/about.php 411
  • Old Commons Burial Ground Little Compton Richard & Patience (Emory) Grinnell Parents of Daniel Grinnell Grandparents of Captain CorneliusCapt. John & Elizabeth (Church) Palmer Parents of Grace Palmer, Daniel’s Wife Maternal Grandparents of Captain Cornelius 412
  • Richard Grinnell Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, G. W. Allen, p. 273 1675-1725 Grandfather of Cornelius Captain Moses GrinnellBelieved to be the oldest Grinnell/Grenelle gravestone in the New World. Old Commons Burial Ground, Little Compton 1751-1797 Brother of Cornelius Little is known of Capt. Moses Grinnell, older brother of Cornelius, except what is written above and the following from The Howland Heirs (p. 43) : “…commander of a privateer during the Revolution, was owner of a house ‘shot up’ in the British raid on New Bedford in 1778.” The date and place of their father Daniel’s death is not known. Capt. Moses Grinnell was an uncle of Moses H. Grinnell, who gained fame and fortune as a partner and president of Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Including their seven Howland uncles who were ship captains, Moses and his siblings had a father and eight uncles who were all ship captains. 413
  • Cornelius & brother Moses in Revolutionary War http://ia700300.us.archive.org/15/items/massachusettssolfgypmass/massachusettssolfgypmass.pdf 414
  • Colonel George Claghorn & Private Cornelius Grinnell Plaque is on a granite boulder at bottom of Union St. at harbor’s edge. From: Daughters of the American Revolution http://services.dar.org/public/dar_research/search_adb/default.cfmAfter the Revolutionary War, Colonel Claghorn went on to build the REBECCA, on which Cornelius was first mate on its maidenvoyage to Europe in 1785. Even though he was never promoted beyond private, Cornelius must have favorably impressed Capt.Claghorn and others to have been selected for this first officer position on the largest ship built in New Bedford up to that time.Colonel Claghorn moved to Boston to superintend the building of the CONSTITUTION at Edmund Hartts Shipyard 1794–1797. http://www.ussconstitutionmuseum.org/collections-history/discover-constitutions-history/chronology 415
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #1997.46.15 OLD IRONSIDES Entering the Port of New Bedford July 31, 1931. Fairhaven in background. Fort Phoenix flag pole, far right. The CONSTITUTION was built in Boston and not New Bedford, as many people mistakenly believe. 416
  • Cornelius Grinnell: Revolutionary War Private Captain of the REBECCA, MARY, & BEDFORD NBWM #1935.55 Cornelius Grinnell was first mate on the maiden voyage of the REBECCA, and he was promoted to captain for the second voyage. Cornelius Howland became his brother-in-law (1885) and partner in several ventures. Three of Capt. Grinnell’s children married four of Gilbert Russell’s daughters (slide 586).NBWM #2001.100.2376After moving from Rhode Island to New Bedford to serve an apprenticeship, Cornelius went to sea on a privateer with Cornelius Howlandas the mate. In short order, the small American brig was captured by a 74-gun British warship; and he was sent to prison in Bermuda.After he was exchanged and returned, he went into the army (slide 414). By 1785, Cornelius had worked his way up to be first mate onthe maiden voyage of the REBECCA. During this voyage, the captain fell ill; and Cornelius took command. Upon returning to NewBedford, he was commissioned as captain. The fortune that Henry Grinnell spent on Arctic exploration originated in his father’s successafter the war as a captain, ship owner, banker, and founder of the company that became Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in 1833. 417
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell’s 1785 Bible Given in Memory of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia GrinnellGift of James B. Grinnell Sylvia Howland married Cornelius Grinnell in 1785. She came from a Quaker family that moved from Duxbury to Dartmouth in the 1650’s. 418
  • Capt. Grinnell’s 1785 Bible Births of Cornelius, Sylvia & their nine children NBWM Archives Birth of Cornelius, Jr. Birth of Joseph Henry’s Birth Birth of Moses Tragic Death of Cornelius, Jr. NBWM Archives 419
  • Record of Howland Births in Cornelius Grinnell’s 1785 BibleIncluding Gideon & Sarah Howland & their thirteen childrenSilvia’s seven brothers were captains including: William,Cornelius, Joseph, Gideon, Jr., Gilbert, John, and Pardon.Most of these Howland men owned ships with Capt.Cornelius Grinnell and his sons & grandsons. Captain CaptainCapt. Cornelius Howland was captured by the Britishwith Cornelius Grinnell, and they were imprisoned onBermuda. After Cornelius Grinnell married Sylvia, thesebrothers-in-law were partners in ships and property. CaptainCapt. Gideon Howland (Jr.), Sylvia Grinnell’s brother,was Hetty Green’s grandfather and an originator of the CaptainHowland fortune. Captain Captain Captain 420
  • Howland Plaques in the Wattles Family Gallery, NBWM Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell was a Direct Descendant of Henry, Zoeth, & Benjamin HowlandHenry Howland was a brother ofPilgrim John Howland and Sylvia’s Benjamin was Zoeth Howland’sgreat, great, great grandfather. son and Sylvia’s great grandfather.Henry Howland came over from It is believed that Benjamin built theEngland around 1622 and settled in simple gambrel-roofed cottage thatDuxbury. In 1656, he was became the Howland familydisenfranchised for being a Quaker, homestead until it was abandonedwhich resulted in him purchasing after Col. Green inherited the oldland in Dartmouth. family homestead and built his grand mansion there (slide 635).Zoeth was a son of Henry Howland. Edward was a son of Capt.He was born in Duxbury and died in Cornelius Howland and one ofTiverton during King Phillip’s War. Sylvia’s many nephews. EdwardHe was Sylvia’s great, great worked with his brother Corneliusgrandfather. Howland, Jr. and his cousin Joseph Grinnell for most of his career. He owned several ships and took over the presidency of the First National Bank when Joseph retired. Along with Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, he was a trustee of the New Bedford Institution for Saving. 421
  • http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoog The relationships established in this book were used by Massachusetts Probate Court to determine the living descendants of the senior Gideon Howland (1734-1823). Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell was a daughter of Gideon Howland, and all her living descendants benefitted under this will. The highly successful Gideon, Jr. was her brother, and she was an aunt of philanthropist Sylvia Ann Howland (slides 623+).The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, pg. i 422
  • “Descendants of Sylvia Grinnell”The Howland Heirs by William M. Emery, 1919 (Refers to Capt. Isaac Howland 1728-1811) The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, p. 43 & 44 http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoog Note: French Ancestry is no longer accurate. 423
  • Photographer & date unknown. NBWM #2000.100.3562 Home of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia 1791-1798 South Water St., between Madison & Walnut. Purchased from Capt. Preserved Fish in 1791. Built by Edward Hudson c. 1769 (slide 668). (DEMOLISHED) 424
  • Left: contrary to this caption, Cornelius was not on the REBECCA for its famous voyage to the Pacific. The following newspaper reports (next slide) prove that he was captain of the MARY on its way to Europe on the historic date that the REBECCA returned from the Pacific. Cornelius was first mate on the REBECCA on its maiden voyage in 1785, which was to Europe, not the Pacific. For several years after its launch, the REBECCA was a merchant ship; and there is no record of Capt. Cornelius working on a whaling ship.New Bedford: A Pictorial History, by Judith Boss & Joseph Thomas: 1983, p. 26. Left: Capt. Cornelius and others learned the hatter’s trade. SinceAccording to Palmer & Worth (below), the Grinnell’s did this involved the use of toxicnot purchase the above house until 1791. If this is correct, mercury (“mad hatter”), he wasthey were not living there when Joseph was born in 1788. very fortunate to have decided to go to sea. Old Dartmouth Historical Sketches Jan. 12, 1909, No. 23, p. 25 425
  • Cornelius Grinnell & the REBECCA’S Famous First Pacific Whaling VoyageNew Bedford Mercury, Jan. 26, 1793 New Bedford Mercury, March 2, 1793 The above report proves that Capt. Cornelius Proof that the ship REBECCA returned from the Pacific departed from New Bedford on Jan. 19, 1793 on Feb. 23, 1793, five weeks after Capt. Cornelius had with the brig MARY bound for France. left for France. Thus, he could not have been on the REBECCA’S famous “first” Pacific whaling voyage. 426
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell & SonsBrig Russell & Joseph Russell Constitution & George Claghorn Russell and Cornelius Grinnell, Daniel Joseph Grinnell & Howlands on Dartmouth & Francis Rotch Rebecca & Cornelius Grinnell Ricketson,Sr. & building committees for Unitarian Boston Tea Party Napoleon & Grinnell, Minturn Weston Howland, Sr. Church & library http://archive.org/details/newbedfordpast00rickgoog 427
  • Abolition Society, 1797The abolitionists, who signed this April24, 1797 letter, included William Rotch,Jr., John Howland, & Thomas Hazard, Jr. NBWM #Mss 2, S-g 3, Series A, Vol 1 428
  • Captain Cornelius Captain Cornelius Cornelius Grinnell: a founder of the BEDFORD BANK in 1803Signed by: William Rotch, Jr., John Howland, Cornelius Grinnell, Thomas Hazard, Jr., and others. (The Bedford Bank was the first bank in New Bedford.) NBWM: Mss 56, Series N, S-s 2, Vol. 1 429
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell and The History of New Bedford, Daniel Ricketson, 1858Not mentioned in Daniel Ricketson’s seminal history are the details of ship ownership involving the Grinnells & Howlands. On Nov.6, 1800, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell & Capt. Preserved Fish became partners in the ship JOHN with James Howland and Allen Shepherd(Ship Registers of New Bedford #1650). On June 22, 1809, they were partners in the ship EUPHRATES along with William and JamesHowland and others (S.R.N.B. #970). On June 5, 1820, Captains Grinnell and Fish once again joined in partnership with William andJames Howland. This time the ship was the CORTES (S.R.N.B. #671) and Joseph Grinnell & Isaac Howland, Jr. were also partners. http://archive.org/details/historynewbedfo00rickgoog 430
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell & Capt. John H. Howland become bankers, 1803Brothers-in-Law (?) are Founding Directors of the BEDFORD BANK & the BEDFORD MARINE INSURANCE CO. The History of New Bedford by Daniel Ricketson, 1858 http://archive.org/details/historynewbedfo00rickgoog 431
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell & Sons Moses & Henry: the philanthropic merchants of New York When the New Bedford Institution for Savings opened its doors on August 15, 1825, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell was one of the incorporators and trustees. Other trustees included his son, William P. Grinnell, and three Howland relatives, John Howland, Jr., James Howland, 2nd, and Gideon Howland, Jr. William Rotch, Jr. was the president. Capt. Grinnell’s two oldest sons, Cornelius, Jr. and Joseph, became so successful with their businesses in New York and New Bedford that they built their own lavish estates next to each other in the most fashionable neighborhood in the city (slide 471). Their father’s business associate since the 1790’s, William Rotch, Jr., built his mansion across the street from Joseph during the same years (1832-1834).The History of New Bedford by Daniel Ricketson, 1858 http://archive.org/details/historynewbedfo00rickgoog 432
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell in The History of New Bedford by Daniel Ricketson, 1858http://archive.org/details/historynewbedfo00rickgoog 433
  • Spinner Publications http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinnerpub/3972402654/ First National Bank: Joseph Grinnell, President 1832-1885 “The First National Bank, on the Southeast corner of Union and Second Streets in 1871. Formerly, the Marine Bank.” Joseph was a congressman, president of Wamsutta Mills, and president of the N. B. & Taunton Railroad (slide 500, etc.). 434
  • First National Bank (Marine Bank): Joseph Grinnell, President 1832-1878 http://archive.org/details/newbedfordmassa00sayegoog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 435
  • National Bank of Commerce: Cornelius Grinnell, Director 1816-1831 http://archive.org/details/newbedfordmassa00sayegoog 436
  • New Bedford Institution for Savings: Cornelius Grinnell, Founding Trustee, 1825 http://archive.org/details/newbedfordmassa00sayegoog 437
  • NEW BEDFORD INSTITUTION FOR SAVINGS (National Park Visitors Center) designed by Russell Warren, 1853 Founding Trustee: Capt. Cornelius Grinnell Founding President: William Rotch, Jr. With the New Bedford Institution for Savings in 1825, the ship owner and his captain from the 1790’s were in business together again (slide 10). Since Cornelius & William died in the same week in 1850 (slide 501), they never saw this beautiful building that was built in 1853.NBWM #2000.100.441.48 438
  • Capt. John H. HowlandFounder of the Bedford Bank with Cornelius Grinnell, etc. Mentor of Joseph Gri5nell According to the Ship Registers of New Bedford, John Howland and Cornelius Grinnell registered the sloop FRANKLIN on Feb. 22, 1799 (slide 449). This seems to have been the first of many vessels that were jointly owned by the Grinnells & Howlands. Capt. Cornelius Grinnell and Capt. John H. Howland were also founding directors of the Bedford Bank and the Bedford Marine Insurance Co. John H. Howland moved to New York around 1810, and he was extensively involved in ship ownership in both New Bedford and New York City. Joseph Grinnell followed his brother Cornelius, Jr. to New York and went to work with his Uncle John in 1810. On April 17, 1810, Cornelius Grinnell, John H. Howland, Joseph Grinnell, William Howland, and others, registered the ship PARNESSO (S.R.N.B. #2445). On Oct. 22, 1810, the ship ALGERNON was registered by Cornelius Grinnell, John H. Howland, and Joseph Grinnell (S.R.N.B. #68). The ship GANGES was registered by Cornelius Grinnell, William Howland, Charles Grinnell, Francis Howland, John H. Howland, Joseph Grinnell, and others on Nov. 11, 1811 (S.R.N.B. #1167). The last New Bedford registered ship owned by Joseph Grinnell and his Uncle John appears to have been the DEBBY AND ELIZA that was registered on Dec. 5, 1811 (S.R.N.B. #710). Whether these two relatives were partners in any New York registered vessels is not known. Much more on Grinnell & Howland ship ownership can be seen in the Addendums. Right: The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, p. 395 http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoog 439
  • Cornelius Howland & Cornelius Grinnell captured by the British c. 1777 The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery, p. 182During the Revolutionary War (c. 1778), Cornelius Grinnell and CorneliusHowland were captured by the British together and imprisoned in Bermuda.Cornelius Grinnell was eventually exchanged and returned to Boston; and http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoogCornelius Howland escaped from prison in Scotland. This relationship betweenthese two shipmates and P.O.W.’s evolved into Cornelius & Sylvia’s marriage Cornelius Howland’s birth is recorded in the Capt.and many family and business alliances between the Grinnells & Howlands. Grinnell’s 1785 bible (slide 420). 440
  • Cornelius Grinnell & Cornelius Howland captured by the British and imprisoned at Bermuda Plus: their Clark’s Cove lot in 1803. Note: pages 185-189 have been omitted. The Columbia Courier 1891 documents about this Clark’s Cove lot at slide 682+.The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery. Pages 185-189 can be found at: http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoog Capt. Cornelius Howland (Sr.) was Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s brother. 441
  • Cornelius Grinnell & Cornelius Howlandcaptured by the British and imprisoned at Bermuda (2nd Account) 442
  • Captains William Howland and Cornelius Grinnell founded Howland & Grinnell in 1804The Columbia Courier The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery, p. 168 & 169 Sylvia’s seven brothers became sea captains. Several books give the impression that Howland & Grinnell was founded by Joseph Grinnell and his uncle Capt. John H. Howland in 1810. Although these two relatives were partners in several ships, the above ad proves that a Howland & Grinnell Company was founded six years earlier, when Joseph was only sixteen years old. Capt. William was an owner of fifteen New Bedford ships, and Capt. Cornelius Howland was an owner of four (slide 714). William’s birth is recorded in the Capt. Grinnell’s 1785 bible (slide 420). 443
  • Ship Registers of New Bedford Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. and Post, Grinnell & MinturnThe following quotation is from The Old Merchants of New York City, by Walter Barrett: “In 1808,… Mr. Grinnell became apartner… under the firm of Post & Grinnell. In 1809, his brother-in-law, Minturn, became a partner, and the firm was changed toPost, Grinnell & Minturn… This store was 69 South Street, corner of Pine, and they did a heavy business. They received cotton by200 and 500 bales. They had vessels for sale and for freighting. In 1812, Mr. Grinnell left the house, and it became Post & Minturn.”Many records were lost during the War of 1812, and this highly-regarded book from 1866 does not state which “Mr. Grinnell” isbeing referred to. However, the above Ship Registers states that the ship ARAB (#167) was registered on Feb. 1, 1811 (370 tons, 106ft.) by owners Cornelius Grinnell, Jr., Henry Post, and Nathaniel G. Minturn. Therefore, it seems clear that the “Grinnell” in Post,Grinnell & Minturn was Cornelius, Jr. and not Capt. Cornelius, as has been assumed. Capt. Cornelius was owner of seventeen vesselsregistered in New Bedford, and Cornelius, Jr. was an owner of sixteen New Bedford vessels. When he moved home to New Bedford,Cornelius, Jr. became a state representative and a builder of lighthouses with William W. Swain, his brother-in-law & neighbor. 444
  • Cousins Gilbert Russell & Cornelius HowlandGilbert and Cornelius were both grandsons of Barnabas Howland. The store on theleft (24 Water St.) was built by Gilbert in 1794 and the store on the right (18 WaterSt.) by Cornelius in 1810. Cornelius Howland was Sylvia Grinnell’s brother, and fourof Gilbert’s children married children of Sylvia & Cornelius Grinnell. These storesare directly behind NBWM. Gilbert’s house is at 61 S. 6th St. (slide 585). The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919 445
  • “Howland and Grinnell, New York, to Richard Blow, Norfolk, 6 January 1813” “Discusses trouble with British confiscation of vessels at sea. From Mss. 65 B625, folder 4, box 35, Richard Blow Papers, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary” Unfortunately, the records of Howland & Grinnell are almost nonexistent. Exactly who the partners were and which ships this company owned are unknown at this time.https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/17345 446
  • Grinnell & Howland Ownership of Schooner MORGIANA, 1814, #1 447
  • Grinnell & Howland Ownership of Schooner MORGIANA, 1814, #2NBWM Archives 448
  • Additional Vessels Owned by Grinnell & HowlandsIn addition to over 50 New York ships, Henry Grinnell owned shares inthe following New Bedford ships: SARAH (2829), BRIGHTON (#330),CORNELIA (#664), GEORGE WASHINGTON (#1226), & EUPHRATES (#979). Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched by J. Grinnell 449
  • Additional Ships Owned by Grinnell & Howlands Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched by J. Grinnell 450
  • State Representative Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Cornelius, Jr. was elected state 1824 Adams Electors representative in 1919. Cornelius Grinnell, Esq. New-Bedford Mercury, Courtesy of NBFPL New-Bedford Mercury, Courtesy of NBFPLCornelius, Jr. had nine living children when he died in 1830. The Howland Heirs by W.M. Emery, p. 247 451
  • Gideon Howland GravestoneNBWM #2000.100.85.35 Apponagansett Meeting House, South Dartmouth Gideon Howland (1734-1823), Sylvia’s father, was buried here. According to George Berish in Quaker Meeting House at Apponaganset, Gideon has the “earliest readable gravestone”. 452
  • Captain Joseph Howland Sylvia Grinnell’s Brother Listed in the Capt. Grinnell’s 1785 bible (slide 420)Artist: Frederick Mayhew NBWM #00.78.12 Artist: FrederickMayhew NBWM #00.78.1 Capt. Joseph Howland was an owner of eight New Bedford ships (slide 714). The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 231 453
  • Captains Gilbert & Pardon Howland Brothers of Sylvia Grinnell Listed in the Capt. Grinnell’s 1785 bible (slide 420)The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 371 The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 404 Capt. Gilbert Howland was an owner of eight New Bedford ships, and Capt. Pardon owned shares in four ships (slide 714). 454
  • “Portrait of Brother and Sister” Gift of Mrs. Peter S. GrinnellCreator: Taber, Deborah Smith NBWM #1982.39.3 455
  • Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Founding Partner: Post, Grinnell & MinturnAncestry of the Grinnell Family, by Wm. Emery, 1931 Ancestry of the Grinnell Family, by Wm. Emery, 1931 Sylvia Grinnell Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Eliza Grinnell Mother of Cornelius, Jr., Joseph, Father of Lawrence, Cornelia, & Joseph G. & six other children. Mother of Cornelia, Lawrence,Moses, Henry, & five other children. Owner/Agent: MINERVA & EUPHRATES Joseph G., & seven other children. 456
  • NBWM #2000.100.85.71 Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.’s Home on County StreetIt is believed that the white horse belonged to Morgan Rotch, who married Josephine Grinnell (slide 618). 457
  • Photographer: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.209 Home of Rep. Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. 385 County St. Built c. 1828. Home of Cornelia Grinnell: 1829-1838. 458
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.318 Home of William W. & Lydia (Russell) Swain“In 1827 Gilbert Russell presented to his children house lots… The lot on the northwest corner of County and Hawthorn streets he conveyed to his son-in-law, William W. Swain…” Thus, Swain was Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.’s brother-in-law. Their grand homes were almost identical and were acrossHawthorn St. from each other. Through the Swain’s generosity, this house became the original Swain Free School before it was DESTROYED by fire. 459
  • Saved by WHALEPhotographer: Unknown Home of Congressman Joseph Grinnell 379 County St., built 1832-1834. After working for his father, Joseph was a partner in several ships with his uncle, Capt. John H. Howland. By 1815, Joseph was a partner in Fish & Grinnell with another uncle, Preserved Fish of New Bedford & New York. In the 1820’s, brothers Henry & Moses joined the firm. After Capt. Fish and Joseph retired, Fish & Grinnell became Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in 1833 with Moses Grinnell as president. WHALE is the Waterfront Historic Area LeaguE. http://www.historic-structures.com/ma/new_bedford/grinnell_mansion.php http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 460
  • Joseph R. Anthony MansionJoseph R. Anthony was a brother-in-law of William T. Russell and Cornelius & MosesGrinnell. “In connection with Gilbert Russell and his son, William T. Russell, Anthonyconducted oil works on the southeast corner of Acushnet avenue and Cannon street, where inrecent years has been the carriage factory of George L. Brownell.” (Palmer & Worth, p. 269).Page from: Life in New Bedford One Hundred Years Ago, Zephaniah Pease, editor, 1922 Drawing from Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/ lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdf Text: Russell Warren, by Prof. Thomas W. Puryea, 1982, p. 10. How this house was “changed radically”can be seen in slide 593. 461
  • Cornelius, Jr., Moses, Joseph Anthony, & William Swain married daughters of Gilbert Russell. Sylvia Grinnell, Jr. married William T. Russell, son of Gilbert. Paintings of Moses, Cornelius, Jr., and Joseph Anthony from collection of Mrs. MorganLife in New Bedford One Hundred Years Ago, Zephaniah Pease, editor, 1922 Rotch (former Josephine Grinnell: slide 618). 462
  • Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdfJoseph Anthony’s estate was adjacent to Cornelius, Jr. & Joseph Grinnell and diagonally across Hawthorn street from William Swain (slide 471). 463
  • Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdf 464
  • Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdf 465
  • Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdf Cornelius Grinnell, Sr. was always referred to as “Captain”. 466
  • Mrs. Morgan Rotch was the former Josephine Grinnell.Internet Archives: http://ia700302.us.archive.org/34/items/lifeinnewbedford00antha/lifeinnewbedford00antha.pdf 467
  • Joseph R. Anthony’s Diary: 1823-1824 This diary is primarily a record of business and social news for Moses Grinnell to read upon his return to New Bedford after traveling to South America and Europe, and numerous references are made to ships and whale oil. Joseph Anthony gives a very illuminating account of Moses’ international business trip that was made almost 190 years ago. On Jan. 21, 1824, Joseph A. wrote the following: “Rec’d accounts by the papers of Moses’ arrival at Rio, the 20th of November.” Moses H. Grinnell was born on March 23,1803, and he was just twenty years old when he embarked on this international business trip. At the time these diaries were written, Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. (1786-1830) was a ship owner/agent, state representative, and owned a sheep farm at Potomska. In addition to being Joseph Anthony’s brother-in-law, they were good friends; and Joseph gives numerous accounts of having tea or dinner with Cornelius, Jr. On April 12, 1823 Joseph wrote: “Cornelius, William T. [Russell], & Nathaniel dined with me today on roast mutton. We all went to Corn’s in the evening to tea Mary Newell [minister] and about twenty others were there.” The April 23 entry begins as follows: “Sunday – a pleasant day. The PERSIA commenced discharging her cargo, which made some stir being the first day in the week. Many considered it wicked.” On April 24, 1823, Joseph Anthony recorded: “Dined at Corn’s, being too stormy to come home. Corn’s found he should be complained of for a breach of the Sabbath yesterday – got Warren to enter a complaint against him & by that means saved half the expense.” On August 28th, Joseph Anthony recorded the following: “Monthly meeting day. Corn’s handed the clerk his resignation to his right of membership, and made a few observations & left the meeting.”NBWM #1969.30.3 Due to Cornelius, Jr. hanging himself and becoming the forgotten man of New Bedford, many people assume today that the 73 references to “Cornelius” and “Corn” are all references to Capt. Cornelius. However, William Emery wrote: “Mr. Anthony’s closest friend was Moses Grinnell, and he was also intimate with Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Mention of these and of the Russell girls is frequent in Mr. Anthony’s dairy for 1823 and 1824…” In the May 6, 1824 entry, Joseph Anthony wrote: “In the evening the EXPERIMENT arrived from New York. Capt. Grinnell and Uncle Abraham came passengers.” Clearly, this proves that all Mr. Anthony’s 71 other references to “Cornelius” and “Corn” are to Cornelius, Jr. and not to Capt. Cornelius Grinnell. 468
  • William P. Grinnell Son of Cornelius & Sylvia Owner of 14 New Bedford Ships Both William P. & Henry had daughters named “Sylvia Howland Grinnell”. Their Grandmother Sylvia did not use the middle name of Howland. These are reasons why she is referred to as Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell in this presentation.The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery, p. 249 http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbei00emergoog The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery, p. 255 469
  • Grinnells, Russells, Swains, & Joseph R. AnthonyAncestry of the Grinnell Family, by Wm. Emery, 1931 Ancestry of the Grinnell Family, by Wm. Emery, 1931 470
  • James Howland Wm. H. Gideon Allen Allen (grandsons of Gideon Howland) Peleg C. William J. Rotch Gothic Cottage Howland Morgan & Josephine (Grinnell) Rotch John & George Howland, Jr. Sarah Howland, Jr. Joseph G. Grinnell William Matthew Rotch, Jr. Howland Edmund Grinnell William W. Swain m. Lydia Russell William D. Rodman-Howland Howland Mansion Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Joseph R. Anthony m. Eliza & Mary Russell Cornelius m. Catherine Russell Howland, Jr. Gilbert & Lydia Russell Lawrence Grinnell Joseph Grinnell m. Sarah R. Russell William T. Russell m. Sylvia Grinnell, Jr.Henry Grinnell m. Sarah Minturn. They lived at “…17 Bond Street, then a fashionable address in the Map of New Bedford Moses Grinnell m. Susan Russell. They “…lived on Fifth Avenue, N.Y. on land that was later occupied by themetropolis [NY].” Geo. H. Walker & Co., 1881 famous Delmonico’s Restaurant.” 471
  • Ship JOHN HOWLAND and Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. NBWM ArchivesFrancis Marion Shaw, attributed NBWM #1972.17 New Bedford Mercury, Vol. XXIV, Dec. 3, 1830 Ship JOHN HOWLAND at Taloo Harbour According to the documents on the right, the JOHN HOWLAND was originally named the KING PHILLIP and Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. was one of the owners when it was launched at the end of Nov. 1830. This was less than two weeks before Cornelius, Jr. died which might be why the name was immediately changed to the JOHN HOWLAND. Perhaps, naming the ship KING PHILLIP was an acknowledgement of the white atrocities that caused King Phillip’s War. 472
  • Cornelius, Jr. to brother JosephDec. 1, 1830. Despite the seeming normality of this letter,Cornelius, Jr. killed himself ten days later, on Dec. 11, 1830. This“great grief to his friends” was recorded in the 1785 family bible(slide 419). Exactly why this tragedy occurred is not known. 473
  • A List of Shipping Belonging to the District of New Bedford, 1832Published by David Silvester, Jan. 1, 1832. NBWM Archives A List of Shipping (detail) The above images state that Cornelius, Jr. was the owner/agent of the MINERVA and the EUPHRATES at the time of his death in Nov. 1830. 474
  • Cornelius, Jr. in Partnership with John & James Howland New Bedford Mercury, June 28, 1833: NBFPL Howland & Grinnell Candle Works The partners were John & James Howland and Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. (see ad to right) New Bedford Mercury, May 10, 1833: NBFPL Above: Cornelius, Jr.’s brother Joseph & William Swain were guardians for his children. Cornelius, Jr. and William Swain were brothers-in-law and lived across Hawthorn St. from each other. The above ad also mentions property that was owned jointly by Cornelius and John & James Howland. Left: in addition to the brig MINERVA and a candle works, Cornelius, Jr. and John & James Howland owned the following vessels together: Brig TRITON, ship MANDARIN, ship EUPHRATES, schooner MORGIANNA, schooner RUSSELL, sloop EMILY, brig COMMODORE DECATUR, ship BALAENA, and ship LYRA.Ship Registers of New Bedford, NBWM 475
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 247Gift of Helen Grinnell King NBWM #2011.3.34 Ancestry of the Grinnell Family: Wm. Emery, 1931, p. 17 Congressman Joseph Grinnell John Quincy Adams visits Joseph in 1843 1788-1885 In his latter years, Joseph was known as “Honorable President: Fish, Grinnell & Co. Joe” and “The Deacon”. He had no children of his President: Marine Bank & First National Bank own, and his siblings had 34 children. After her parents President: New Bedford & Taunton Railroad died, Joseph adopted his niece, Cornelia. This portrait President: Wamsutta Mills, 1847-1885 appears to be identical to a much larger painting in the Member: Grinnell, Minturn & Co. New Bedford Free Public Library by Benoni Irwin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 476 .
  • Joseph Grinnell Mansion: “Red Cross Volunteers”“These women are making surgical dressings at the Grinnell house, circa 1918… The New Bedford headquarters was located in the old Grinnell Mansion… Photograph from New Bedford American Chapter of the Red Cross, October 1914 to May 1919.” New Bedford: A Pictorial History: Judith A. Boss & Joseph D. Thomas, 1983, pg. 172 477
  • NBWM Research Library NBWM Research Library Unitarian Church Pews of Cornelius, Jr. and Joseph G. Grinnell Cornelius, Jr. purchased a pew in 1828. His widow and his sons, Lawrence and Joseph G. along with his brothers Joseph and Moses purchased pews in the new Unitarian Church when it was built in 1838. “The congregation financed construction by selling pews at auction. The final accounting showed a surplus: pew sales generated $40,125 income, construction cost only $39,997.” 478
  • NBWM Archives Original Pew Plan, Unitarian Church of New BedfordSeveral pew holders were related to Cornelius and Sylvia, and many were prominent merchants & abolitionists like Charles W. Morgan,who sat across the aisle from Joseph Grinnell. These two titans of New Bedford were buried just 68 ft. from each other (slide 503) in the“Unitarian Section” of Oak Grove Cemetery. Joseph had pew No. 44 and Moses owned the pew directly behind him. Lawrence &Joseph G. were sons of Cornelius, Jr. and nephews of Joseph & Moses. In addition to their own businesses, these brothers were in theinsurance business together; and they built similar grand houses within two blocks of their Uncle Joe in the 1840’s (slides 607 & 610). 479
  • Grinnell/Howland PewsCornelius & Sylvia’s relatives:No. 44: Joseph, sonNo. 45: Moses, sonNo. 70: J. G. Grinnell, grandson JosephNo. 74: W. H. Allen, Sylvia’s nephew GrinnellNo. 48: Gideon Allen, Sylvia’s nephewNo. 32: W. W. Swain, in-law MosesNo. 85: J. R. Anthony, in-law GrinnellNo. 72: James Howland 480
  • Author: Rev. Dan Harper, 2008 (Partial Article) 481
  • Church Bell donated by Congressman Moses H. GrinnellPhoto by J. Grinnell The New Bedford Mercury, March 23, 1838 482
  • “Mr. Grinnell’s Position on Slavery” The Mercury, Feb. 17-20, 1849 (Partial Article)Congressman Joseph Grinnell’s anti-slavery voting record detail:House Roll #458: Jan 6, 1851TO SUSPEND THE RULES AND INTRODUCE A RESOLUTION CALLING FOR THE REPEAL OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE LAWPASSED AT THE LAST SESSION OF CONGRESS. (P.177-1,2)Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Aye 68-119, 42 not votingHouse Roll #108: Mar 11, 1850TO CONSIDER THE NEW YORK RESOLUTIONS TO DISCONTINUE SLAVERY IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, INTERRITORY ACQUIRED FROM MEXICO, TEXAS, THE ADMISSION OF CALIFORNIA AS A STATE OF THE UNION, TOOPPOSE ATTEMPTS TO EFFECT A DISSOLUTION OF THE UNION. (P.492-1)Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Aye 107-63, 60 not votingHouse Roll #174: May 27, 1850TO SUSPEND RULES TO INTRODUCE A BILL TO ABOLISH THE SLAVE TRADE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. (P.1071-2)Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Aye 99-64, 67 not votingHouse Roll #345: Sep 5, 1850TO AMEND THE AMENDMENT OF MR. WENTWORTH, WHICH PROPOSES TO COMMIT S. 307 TO THE COMMITTEE OF THEWHOLE ON THE STATE OF THE UNION WITH INSTRUCTIONS TO AMEND SAME BY EXCLUDING SLAVERY IN THETERRITORY ACQUIRED FROM MEXICO, (P.1753-3, 1755-3)Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Nay 72-128, 27 not votingHouse Roll #410: Sep 24, 1850TO SUSPEND THE RULES IN ORDER TO INTRODUCE AN ACT TO ABOLISH SLAVERY IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. (P.1954-1)Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Aye 54-107, 67 not votingHouse Roll #362: Jan 8, 1849TO SUSPEND RULES IN ORDER TO INTRODUCE A RESOLUTION INSTRUCTING THE COMM. ON THE JUDICIARY TOREPORT A BILL PROVIDING FOR APPREHENSION AND DELIVERY OF FUGITIVE SLAVES.Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Nay 79-100, 50 not votingHouse Roll #367: Jan 10, 1849TO DISPENSE WITH FURTHER PROCEEDINGS IN THE CALL, DURING CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION INSTRUCTINGTHE COMM. OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TO REPORT A BILL PROHIBITING SLAVERY IN SAID DISTRICT.Hon. Joseph Grinnell’s vote: Aye 120-62, 47 not voting (partial article & partial list) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 483
  • Harriet Jacobs Abolitionist Harriet Jacobs and Cornelia GrinnellCornelia was born on March 19, 1825. Her father, Cornelius Grinnell, Jr., was a founding partner of Post, Grinnell, & Minturn in New York, aMassachusetts State Representative, ship owner/agent, and light house builder. Her mother was the former Eliza Tallman Russell, and Corneliawas the youngest of ten children. Nine of the children were living when their mother died on Jan. 9, 1827. On Oct. 9, 1828, Cornelius,Jr. married his wifes sister, Mary Russell. On Dec. 11, 1830 Cornelius, Jr. took his own life; and Cornelia became an orphan when she was onlyfive years old. Shortly after Cornelius, Jr.’s tragic death, Cornelias uncle Joseph and his wife took her on an tour of Europe while they built amansion next door to Cornelias home (corner of County and Hawthorn Streets). Joseph adopted her after her stepmother died in 1838. In 1846,Cornelia married the famous writer, N.P. Willis. Harriet Jacobs, a former slave, worked as a nanny for the Willis family; and she wrote herfamous work, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, while living with Cornelia. In 1852, Cornelia purchased Harriet’s freedom. Due to N.P.Willis’s pro-slavery sympathies, Harriet was afraid to discuss her writing with Cornelia. For the rest of her life Harriet had a close relationshipwith Cornelia and her children, and it has been reported that Cornelia and her daughter Edith lived in Harriet’s boarding house in Cambridgeafter Uncle Joe died in 1885. The bond between Cornelia and Uncle Joe was so strong that Cornelia and Edith are buried next to him and hiswives in Oak Grove Cemetery (slide 502) instead of being buried with Cornelia’s husband, who was buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery,Cambridge. Harriet was also buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, which is one of the most famous cemeteries in the country.The above photos are from: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, edited by Jean Fagin Yellin. http://www.harrietjacobs.org/ 484
  • Abolition, Cornelia, and her letters in the Library of CongressCornelias contribution to the Abolitionist Movement was described by J. F. Yellin: “In 1850, Congress passed a Fugitive Slave Law rulingthat all citizens, including those in northern states where slavery had been abolished, were subject to punishment if they aided fugitives…[Harriet] met Nathaniel Parker Willis’s new wife, Cornelia Grinnell Willis, and was employed to care for her newborn baby… To freeher, and reassure her about her children’s freedom, Mrs. Willis arranged for the American Colonization Society to act as an intermediaryand early in 1852 bought Jacobs freedom… This transaction, effected with the aid of Rev. John B. Pinney of the New York ColonizationSociety, is explained in a letter from Cornelia Grinnell Willis to Elizabeth Davis Bliss Bancroft [May 3, 1852], Bancroft-Bliss FamilyPapers, Library of Congress.” Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, edited by J. F. Yellin, p. 291 Right: Cornelia Grinnell Statue by Horatio Greenough “Mr. [Joseph] Grinnell was in Florence in the NBWM #1979.43 spring of 1830 and there employed Horatio Greenough, the sculptor, to make him a statue of his niece, then a child of five years.” Wright, Nathalia: Horatio Greenough, the First American SculptorThe Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 253 (New-Bedford Mercury, slide 493) 485
  • Horatio Greenough, Pre-eminent SculptorGift of : Mrs. William A. Burnham NBWM Archives Phototographer: Russell, Andrew J. Library of Congress LC-DIG ppmsca-07301 Receipt to Joseph Grinnell, 1830 Statue of Washington in front of Capitol, July 11, 1863 Above left is Horatio Greenough’s receipt to Joseph Grinnell. Horatio was the first artist to receive a commission from Congress, and he became the pre-eminent sculptor of his time. Seventeen of his works are in the Museum of Fine Arts, three at the Smithsonian, three at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, seven at Harvard, three at Yale, three at the Boston Public Library, and many more in other great collections documented in the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS). http://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?q=greenough%20horatio 486
  • George Washington by Horatio Greenough Original location in Capitol Rotunda Owned by Smithsonian“Horatio Greenough (September 6, 1805 – December 18,1852) was an American sculptor best known for his UnitedStates government commissions The Rescue (1837-1850) andGeorge Washington (1840). [He was the first artist to receivea commission from Congress] His sculptures reflected truthand reality, but also ancient classical aesthetic ideals… Manyof Horatio’s works were done in Florence, Italy where hespent most of his professional life... Some of his othersculptures include: James Fenimore Cooper (1831), Castorand Pollux (1847, Marquis de Lafayette (1831-1832)… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Greenough Samuel Appleton by Horatio Greenough Harvard University Portrait Collection New York Public Library Digital ID: 11879 487
  • “The Rescue, a statue group by Horatio Greenough, The Rescue1853. It was later removed from the U.S. Capital steps… by Horatio GreenoughHis father did not hinder his family’s artistic bent but Original Location on Capitol Stepsinsisted on sending Horatio to Harvard, where hegraduated in 1825 and where he met the famed Americanpainter Washington Allston. Since childhood he hadloved to shape things. While in college he submitted anobelisk model in a design contest for the Bunker HillMonument. At his friends’ urging, after graduation hesailed to Rome to experience art first hand. He becameAmerica’s first sculptor. For the rest of his life, he wouldspend only three years here… On returning to Italy inmid-1828 the Yankee stonecutter (as he called himself)settled in Florence with its better climate and artisticcolony… Through his connections, Greenough was ableto get Lafayette to sit for him in Paris, whence came thebust of the Revolution’s youngest general in the StateHouse. In 1832 he was commissioned to produce a full-length statue of Washington for the Capitol’s rotunda.This made him greatly sought after in Florence…In 1836, after Washington had been cast in plaster,Greenough visited America briefly to get a commissionfor a statuary group called ‘The Rescue’ for the easternfacade of the Capitol… In 1851, Florence became a hotpoint in the fight for Italian independence. Greenoughand his family returned to America, making a home inNewport, Rhode Island. Characteristically, the artistplunged into events and urged statues of Cooper thenovelist and Washington for Newport. He wrote essaysand delivered lectures on art. His activity overcame hisnervous system, and he was taken to McLean MentalHospital in metropolitan Boston, where, after a few days,he died on December 18, 1852.”//www.jphs.org/people/2005/4/14/horatio-greenough-americas-first-sculptor.html Library of Congress: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005689033/ 488
  • Horatio Greenough in the MFA Permanent Collection http://www.mfa.org/search/collections?keyword=horatio+greenough&objecttype=77 489
  • Gift of Mrs. Wm. Burnham NBWM #1979.43.2.1 New York Historical SocietyN. P. Willis, by Horatio Greenough, 1833 N. P. Willis by William A. Wall, 1833 Nathaniel Parker Willis married Cornelia Grinnell, daughter of Cornelius & Eliza Grinnell, Jr., in 1846. N.P. Willis was a wealthy writer and publisher who penned the following famous lines: “Luxurious as the town is now, and few and far between as are the lead- colored bonnets and drab cutaway coats, there is a strong tincture of Quaker precision and simplicity in the manners of the wealthier class in New Bedford, and among the nautical class it mixes up very curiously with the tarpaulin carelessness and ease.” 490
  • Published in 1855 Architect: Calvert Vaux Idlewild, Cornwall-on-Hudson Home of Cornelia Grinnell & N. P. Willis This estate is less than 25 miles from Cornelia’s Uncle Moses in Irvington. “In 1846, Willis settled near the banks of Canterbury Creek near the Hudson River… and named his new home Idlewild… Willis worked closely with the architect, Calvert Vaux, to carefully plan each gable and piazza to fully take advantage of the dramatic view of the river and mountains.” (Wikipedia) Calvert Vaux also designed Albert Bierstadt’s Malkasten. http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9904E3D6143FE433A2575AC0A9679D946097D6CF http://archive.org/stream/villasandcottag00vauxgoog#page/n116/mode/2up Photo: Robert Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views, Photography Collection, Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints & Photographs, The New York Public Library 491
  • N. P. Willis, Harriet Jacobs, & the Grinnellshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Parker_Willis#cite_note-Beers355-121 http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9904E3D6143FE433A2575AC0A9679D946097D6CF 492
  • Joseph, Cornelia, and N. P. Willis August 7, 1907, p. 40(Partial Article) 493
  • Wamsutta of New Bedford by Henry Beetle Hough, 1946. pp. 1 & 2 Hon. Joseph Grinnell, First President of Wamsutta Mills: 1848-1885 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Grinnell 494
  • Hon. Joseph Grinnell, Director of Wamsutta Mills: 1847-1885Despite their political rivalry, Joseph & Mayor Abraham Howland lived across the street from each other in granite mansions designed by Russell Warren. Joseph’s was at 379 County St. (slide 588) and Abraham at 388 County St. (slides 602 & 604). Please see 1881 map at slide 466. Frederick was Joseph’s nephew and the inventor of the Grinnell Automatic Sprinkler (slides 526+) 495
  • Wamsutta of New Bedford by Henry Beetle Hough, 1946. pp. 12-14 Wamsutta of New Bedford by Henry Beetle Hough, 1946. p. 15 496
  • *Wamsutta of New Bedford by Henry Beetle Hough, 1946. pp. 17-19 *“Uncle Gid” was Gideon (Jr.), Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s brother (slides 624-627). 497
  • Wamsutta Mill William T. Russell to Henry Grinnell (brother-in-law) Oct. 22, 1845Right top letter: about Thomas Bennett, Jr.and the cotton industry. William T. Russellmarried Henry’s sister Sylvia. He lived onRussell Street half a block from the JosephGrinnell Mansion (slide 606). WhenJoseph founded the Wamsutta Mills,Grinnell, Minturn & Co. was an investor.From the remark about slaves in this letterand other documents, it is safe to assumethat William and Henry were both anti-slavery. One source states that Moses wasan abolitionist and could “always becounted on” by the conductor at Albany. William T. Russell to Thomas Bennett, Jr. Nov. 5, 1845Bottom right letter: regarding the cottonindustry. Joseph Grinnell became the firstchairman of Wamsutta Mills, and Henrybecame an investor along with theirbrother Moses (previous slide). 498
  • NBWM #1971.7 Wamsutta Mill by William A. Wall, c. 1850At the time his father died in 1850, Joseph Grinnell was the founding president of Wamsutta Mills and founding president of the New Bedford andTaunton Railroad Corporation (red train in painting, lower center). In 1850, Joseph was also a U.S. congressman (1843-1851) and the founding presidentof the Marine Bank. Since few people would want this painting of a factory in their home, it is possible that Joseph commissioned this for his office. Print: https://www.1000museums.com/enlarge/201731/ 499
  • Grinnell Brothers’ Peak of Commercial Success in Mid 1800’s Honorable Joseph Grinnell in 1849: Marine Bank President, N. B. & T. Rail Road President, and President of Wamsutta Mills (1848-1885) Joseph was a U. S. Congressman 1843-1851, and he held the above top positions concurrently. In 1850, The U. S. Grinnell Expedition was “launched” by Henry; and also in 1850 Donald McKay launched the flash packet ship CORNELIUS GRINNELL. In 1851, Grinnell, Minturn & Co. purchased the FLYING CLOUD (slide 504+); and Grinnell, Minturn & Co. also invested in Wamsutta Mills. It can be said that the Grinnell brothers’ Quaker heritage through the Howland family enabled them to work and live together and attain a high level of commercial and political success. 500
  • Capt. Cornelius Grinnell &William Rotch, Jr. Obituary Grinnell Polar Expedition April 26, 1850 April 26, 1850 . These two momentous events in the Grinnell family were printed in the same column of the New-Bedford Mercury, on April 26, 1850. On April 19, 1850, Capt. Grinnell died at age 92 in the same week as William Rotch, Jr. Cornelius worked as a ship captain for William Rotch, Jr., and they were co-directors of the Bedford Bank when it opened in 1803. When the New Bedford Institution for Savings opened in 1825, both men were incorporators and William Rotch, Jr. became president. William had been born into a wealthy Nantucket whaling family in 1759 one year after Capt. Cornelius, who started out as a poor apprentice hatter. The Rotch family plot is one plot over from the Grinnell plot, and Cornelius Grinnell and William Rotch, Jr. are buried about 150 ft. apart. Grandson Frederick, inventor of the Grinnell Automatic Sprinkler (slides 526+), has the most ornate grave marker in the Grinnell family plot. In all, there are forty-nine grave markers with the family name of Grinnell in Oak Grove Cemetery. 501
  • Cornelia Joseph Grinnell Grinnell Willis Cornelius Grinnell Sylvia GrinnellPhotos by J. Grinnell Oak Grove Cemetery, July 4, 2010 Foreground from left: Capt. Cornelius, Sylvia, and Sylvia’s sister, Desire. Of the five identical headstones in the background, Joseph is second from the left, with stepdaughter Cornelia second from the right (detail). There are many other Grinnells and Howlands buried here including Sylvia’s brother Gideon Howland (Jr.) and his daughters (slide 624). Sons Moses and Henry were buried in New York where they moved c. 1825. Cornelius, Jr.’s burying place in not known. 502
  • The Grinnells & Charles W. MorganL Cornelius & Sylvia Photos by J. Grinnell Above: the graves of Cornelius, Sylvia, and her sister Desire are visible next to the flag on the far right. In left foreground is the headstone of ship owner/agent, Charles W. Morgan. “Morgan left the Quaker faith to become a Unitarian and was recognized as an abolitionist…” http://www.mysticseaport.org Charles Morgan is buried 54 ft. from Cornelius Grinnell and 83 ft. from Joseph Grinnell. The wealthy abolitionist William Rotch, Jr. is buried 120 ft. to the right of Cornelius & Sylvia. Morgan Rotch was Charles W. Morgan’s grandson and great grandson of William Rotch, Jr. On Dec. 4, 1879, Morgan Rotch married Josephine Grinnell (slide 618). Josephine was a great granddaughter of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia. Morgan Rotch was in the insurance business, and he was a mayor of New Bedford (1885-1888) and a state senator. Morgan & Josephine are buried in the Grinnell Family Plot. Left: Unitarian Church records in NBWM Research Library. 503
  • Chapter V. The FLYING CLOUD & the Yachtsmen Image courtesy Bancroft Library University of California Berkeley The Flying Cloud by James Butterworth, 1852 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Cloud_(clipper) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grinnell,_Minturn_%26_Co 504
  • Clipper Ship FLYING CLOUDOwner: Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Some Famous Sailing Ships and Their Builder: Donald McKay by Richard C. McKay, 1931, pg. 142 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grinnell,_Minturn_%26_Co http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Cloud_(clipper) 505
  • Packet Ship CORNELIUS GRINNELL Built by Donald McKaySome Famous Sailing Ships and Their Builder: Donald McKay by R. C. McKay The New-Bedford Mercury, June 21, 1850 Cornelius, Jr. was the first of the Grinnell brothers to enter the New York shipping business when he became a partner in Post & Grinnell in 1809 (Post, Grinnell & Minturn in 1810: slide 445). Ship registers prove that Cornelius, Jr. owned 16 ships with his relatives and with Fish & Grinnell until he died in 1830. 506
  • Some Famous Sailing Ships and Their Builder: Donald McKay by Richard C. McKay, 1931, pg. 50 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grinnell,_Minturn_%26_Co 507
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 250 Moses H. (1803-1807) was the fifth son of Capt. Cornelius and Sylvia Grinnell. He was president of Grinnell, Minturn & Co. for most of his career andGift of Mrs. Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1984.31.1 developed it into a leading world-wide shipping firm. Even though he permanently moved to New York in Congressman Moses H. Grinnell 1825, he maintained a pew at the New Bedford 1803-1877 Unitarian Church and a home in New Bedford. His President: Grinnell, Minturn & Co. funeral was held at the Unitarian Church of All Owner: FLYING CLOUD Souls, New York City. One source states that Moses Contributor: Grinnell & Hayes Arctic Expeditions helped to fund the Grinnell Arctic Expeditions, and it President: Merchants Savings Bank, N.Y. is believed that Joseph was also involved. President: New York State Chamber of Commerce http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 508
  • Susan Russell was the first wife of Moses Grinnell and the sister of Eliza Russell, the first wife of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Soon after their 1824 marriage, Moses & Susan moved to New York, and Moses became a partner at Fish & Grinnell which evolved into Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Moses became the renowned “head of the house” and was the president when it was described as follows: “In the 1840’s and around mid-century, Grinnell, Minturn & Company, of New York, was the foremost sailing packet ship owner and operator and one of the leading general shipping houses in New York. The firm was of outstanding prominence during the brief clipper shipbuilding era, and… it was conspicuous as the owner of the FLYING CLOUD.” Moses built a mansion “on Fifth Avenue, N.Y. on land that was later occupied by the famous Delmonico’s Restaurant.” (slide 202+) When the New York Yacht Squadron visited New Bedford on August 16, 1860, The New York Times reported that Moses attended with his schooner RESTLESS, Henry was on the Regatta Committee, and the club was entertained at Joseph’s mansion (slide 514+). “The Union Club had its palmy social days in the Astor residence… The first president of the club was Chief Justice Samuel Jones. He was succeeded by John A. King, at whose death Moses H. Grinnell took the presidency…” The Union Club was/is the premier club in the country. The Memorial History of New York: 1893, edited by James Watson.Gift of Mrs. Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1984.31.2 Susan (Russell) Grinnell 1800-1832 The paintings of Moses & Susan came from the collection of Peter & Mary Lou Grinnell who donated the GRINNELL RESOLUTE Desk, three William A. Wall paintings, and many other family treasures. Peter was a founder of WHALE and a great, great grandson of Cornelius & Eliza Grinnell, Jr. 509 .
  • Clipper Ship Flying Cloud“Ship Flying Cloud of New York Alx’r Winsor Com’r Going into Hong Kong.” This painting hangs over one of the fireplaces in the Millicent Library (slide 238). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grinnell,_Minturn_%26_Co http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Cloud_(clipper) 510
  • Subject: newport August 22, 1855 Copyright © The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/1860/08/18/news/new-york-yacht-squadron-regatta-new-bedford-julia-wins- champion-prize-reunion.html?scp=24&sq=moses+grinnell&st=p http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 511
  • Moses H. Grinnell, the New York Yacht Club, and the America’s Cup 512
  • Creator: James Butterworth for Currier & Ives Library of Congress LC-DIG-pga-00979 The Yacht “HAZE” 87 TONS Designed by George Steers, 1853 Owned by Moses H. Grinnell, 1856 http://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?q=yacht%20haze 513
  • 1857 1856 The History of the New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr., p. 36 1858The History of the New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr., p. 34 The History of the New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr., p. 37 514
  • The New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr. 1859The History of the New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr., p. 40 1860The History of the New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr., p. 43 515
  • The New York Yacht Club by John Parkinson, Jr. 1889 516
  • Painting by: Benjamin Russell NBWM #1968.52 “Destruction of Whaleships off Cape Thaddeus, Arctic Ocean, June 23, 1865, by Confederate Steamer SHENANDOAH” “The Brig SUSAN ABIGAIL is on fire, and the Ship EUPHRATES is also in smoke & flames.” The EUPHRATES was owned by the Grinnell & Howland families from 1809 to 1865 (slides 408+). 517
  • Creator: Bradley & Rulofson NBWM #00.203.42 “Portrait of five whaling captains whose ships were seized and burned by the rebel ships still loyal to the Southern Confederacy in the months following Appomattox.”These ships included the EUPHRATES, Capt. Hathaway (2nd from right), which was owned by Grinnells & Howlands from the time itwas built in 1809 until it was sunk by the SHENANDOAH on June 23, 1865. Henry Grinnell was an owner from 1842-1866 (slide 408). 518
  • sippicanhistoricalsociety.org Photos: minkstudios Abraham Lincoln & Lawrence Grinnell “Passport for Bark MILWOOD of New Bedford 1865.” The MILLWOOD passport is countersigned by Lawrence Grinnell, collector for the port of New Bedford. Lawrence (1811-1893) was a son of Cornelius, Jr. and Eliza. As a young man, he went to N.Y. to work for his uncles in the counting room of Fish & Grinnell. When his father died, he returned to New Bedford to take over his business as the owner/agent of the MINERVA and EUPHRATES (slide 474). He was also in the insurance business with his brother Joseph G., and his offices were on the second floor of the Double Bank Building (slide 591). In the 1840’s, these two brothers built grand houses within two blocks of each other and their Uncle Joe (slides 607 & 610). 519
  • Congressman Moses H. Grinnell (NY) President: Union Club 1866-1873http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell Notable Members: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Club_of_the_City_of_New_York 520
  • Hon. Moses H. Grinnell: President, New York Chamber of Commerce http://books.google.com/books?id=GR0bAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA44#v=onepage&q&f=false 521
  • Hon. Moses H. Grinnell Right: The New York Times November 25, 1877 Moses in Paris, 1867 Creator: Langerock NBWM #93.44.2-R&V http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html? res=9B04E3DD173EE73BBC4D51DFB767838C669FDE &scp=4&sq=moses+grinnell&st=p http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses_H._Grinnell 522
  • Moses Grinnell &Unitarian Church of All Souls, New York City Jacob Wrey Mould had been in the United States only a year in 1853 when he was consulted by Moses H. Grinnell regarding plans for a new Unitarian Church of All Souls. The church, under the strong guidance of Rev. Dr. Henry Whitney Bellows, had been searching for an adequate design. When architect C. F. Anderson presented his plans, Grinnell, the president of the trustees, was less than impressed. Although the trustees had approved Anderson’s design, they were vetoed by Grinnell… Mould had been hard at work designing decorative elements for the Crystal Palace Exhibition in Bryant Park. Three months later when, on July 8, 1853, his plans were exhibited to the board of trustees Grinnell convinced a wary Bellows to accept them. Bellows would remark that Grinnell was “bewitched by the architect.” Built on the southeast corner of Fourth Avenue and 20th Street it was completed in 1855. Although contemporary critics termed the style “Byzantine,” it was actually Italian Romanesque… With his design, Mould had indeed stepped out of the box. By using alternating courses of deep red Philadelphia brick and beige-yellow Italian Caen stone he created a striped overall effect which, according to the “Oxford Dictionary of Architecture and Landscaping,” “introduced structural polychromy to the USA.” All Souls Church c.1869 - NYPL Collection Architect: Jacob Wrey Mould Critics, however, were quick to react. It was called by one, “the most unfortunate ecclesiastical edifice ever to be erected not only in New York, but anywhere else in the world for that matter.” The congregation, who felt they now owned a “white elephant,” according to Henderson, was even more shocked when it was revealed that Mould had gone $48,000 over budget. It was Grinnell who helped relieve the financial crisis from his own pocket… Dr. Bellows died in 1882 and four years later a bronze memorial table with a life-sized relief of the minister by Augustus Saint-Gaudens was unveiled in the sanctuary. [Moses died in 1877.] http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2011/02/lost-church-of-holy-zebra-moulds.htmlAugustus Saint-Gaudens life sized bronze memorial of Dr. Bellows -- (from "A Loiterer in New York”) 523
  • New York Public Library #430777 http://www.sleepyhollowcemetery.org/?s=grinnell“Hon. Moses H. Grinnell, Collector of the Port of New York” “The restored head stone of Congressman Moses Hicks Grinnell” 524
  • Bierstadt Brothers NBWM #2000.100.2143 Wolfenstein NBWM #2000.100.272 Bierstadt Brothers NBWM #2000.100.2142 “Edward Bierstadt (1824–1906) was an American portrait and landscape photographer, and engraver. He was a brother of the painter Albert Bierstadt, and made a number of engravings of his brother’s work.” Wikipedia 525
  • Photographer: Joseph G. Tirrell NBWM #2000.100.85.78 (detail) Joseph Grinnell Mansion: third floor added by Frederick c. 1895 The home at far right was built by Joseph’s oldest brother, Cornelius, Jr. Frederick was a grandson of Cornelius, Jr. 526
  • NBWM #2000.100.1790 The Howland Heirs: Wm. M. Emery, 1919, p. 262 Frederick Grinnell: invented the Grinnell Automatic SprinklerFrederick (1836-1905) was a son of Lawrence and grandson of Cornelius, Jr. (slide 3). He invented the Grinnell AutomaticSprinkler, and his international company remains in business today as SimplexGrinnell (slide 713). Frederick was a member ofthe New York Yacht Club and the Eastern Yacht Club. In The New Bedford Yacht Club, Llewellyn Howland III wrote: “But aneven more important addition to the fleet in 1889 was the fast and lovely 83-foot Burgess schooner QUICKSTEP, launched that yearfor Frederick Grinnell of Providence and New Bedford… Legend has it that QUICKSTEP was unbeaten during her first four years ofactive racing and that on three occasions she won ‘special races against the finest [New York and Eastern Club] schooners in theclass above her’ … the splendid QUICKSTEP, which mainly raced in New York fixtures… And the club fleet now (1902)numbered seven steam yachts (including Frederick Grinnell’s brand-new 124-foot Herreshoff-designed QUICKSTEP)…” http://www.simplexgrinnell.com/ENUS/AboutUs/Pages/SimplexGrinnellHistory.aspx 527
  • Gift of Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #2000.100.1099 Schooner QUICKSTEP c. 1898 Owned by Frederick Grinnell, “124-foot Herreshoff-designed” 528
  • The New Bedford Yacht Club, Llewellyn Howland III Photographer: Dr. Henry D. Prescott NBWM Collection Schooner QUICKSTEP c. 1898 Frederick Grinnell, Owner 529
  • Frederick Grinnell& sons Lawrence and RussellThe New Bedford Yacht Club: L. Howland III, p. 126 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Grinnell 530
  • “Russell Grinnell’s summer cottage, Red Top Birchfield, South Dartmouth, circa 1910.” Greetings From Dartmouth, Massachusetts, A Postcard History by Beverly M. Glennon and Judith N. Lund, 2003 Photographer: Theodosia Chase . Dartmouth Historical CommissionLike his father Frederick, Russell was a member of the New York Yacht Club; and he won the 1928 Race to Bermuda in RUGOSA II. 531
  • Grinnell Brothers, Bermuda Race, 1828 Lawrence – Flying Cloud III, Special Class Winner Russell - Rugosa II, Overall Winner Morris Rosenfeld, Photographer Grinnell Yacht Photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1980.56.5 Flying Cloud III Crew: Lawrence Grinnell, Jr., Owner Llewellyn Howland III wrote the following about Lawrence Grinnell, Jr.: “…Lawrence Grinnell’s new Hand-designed 55-foot FLYING CLOUD II(1922)… the yacht club at its 1923 annual meeting elected Lawrence Grinnell as its new commodore…” (p. 125) “FLYING CLOUD III finished out of the money in 1924, but under the command of Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. she won the special class in the 1928 Bermuda Race.” The New Bedford Yacht Club, Llewellyn Howland III, p. 132 532
  • Photographer: Morris Rosenfeld NBWM: 1980.56.13 RUGOSA II, Russell Grinnell (far left) Start of 1928 Bermuda Race FLYING CLOUD III, Lawrence, Jr. Overall Winner (white hull) Grinnell Yacht Photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell 533
  • Grinnell Yacht photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1981.80.137.21.a FLYING CLOUD, Commodore Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. & RUGOSA, Russell Grinnell Lawrence & Russell were sons of Frederick & Mary and great grandsons of Cornelius & Eliza Grinnell, Jr. 534
  • Photographer: Morris Rosenfeld NBWM: 1980.56.7 FLYING CLOUD III, 1928 Bermuda Race 535
  • Photographer: Albert Cook Church NBWM #1980.56.2 Schooner Flying Cloud III Owner: Commodore Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. Grinnell Yacht Photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell 536
  • Grinnell Yacht photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell NBWM #1981.80.137.21.a FLYING CLOUD, Commodore Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. & RUGOSA, Russell Grinnell 537
  • Photographer: Levick, Edwin NBWM #1980.56.3 Schooner Flying Cloud III Owner: Commodore Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. Grinnell Yacht Photos: gift of Peter S. Grinnell 538
  • NBWM #1981.80.131.5 RUGOSA II, Winner of Race to Bermuda, 1928Built by Herreshoff in 1926 for Russell Grinnell, great grandson of Cornelius & Eliza Grinnell, Jr. Photo: gift of Peter S. Grinnell 539
  • Russell Grinnell Great Grandson of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza Bombé Desk President: General Fire Extinguisher Co. Gift of Russell Grinnell Director: Morse Twist Drill This desk came from the family of Director: Mechanics National Bank Russell Grinnell’s wife, Rose Gifford, 1928 Bermuda Race Overall Winner daughter of artist R. Swain Gifford. New York Yacht Club Member The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 275“In 1869, Frederick Grinnell, aMassachusetts-born engineer, purchased acontrolling interest in Providence Steam and Lawrence Grinnell (II)Gas and became its president… Grinnell Great Grandson of Cornelius, Jr. & Elizadied in 1905 and was succeeded by his New Bedford Yacht Club Commodoreformer executive assistant, Frank H.Maynard. The Canadian General FireExtinguisher Co., Ltd. (later Grinnell Co. ofCanada, Ltd.), was incorporated in 1914.Five years later, Grinnell Co., Inc. waschartered to act as a sales agency for GeneralFire Extinguisher, and Grinnell Co. of thePacific was formed to consolidate andexpand West Coast operations… Grinnellsson Russell succeeded Maynard as presidentof General Fire Extinguisher in 1925.” The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 276 DEACCESSIONED 540
  • Photographer: Norman Fortier NBWM# 2004.11.9025 Russell was a member of the NY 40 Yawl RUGOSA New York Yacht Club, and the Russell Grinnell, Owner RUGOSA was registered in N.Y. 541
  • Prescott Collection NBWM #1981.80.150.13.a ESCAPE, Llewellyn Howland, Jr., July 21, 1935 Llewellyn Howland, Jr. was a great, great, great grandson of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s brother, Capt. Cornelius Howland (1758-1835). Cornelius Howland was a shipmate, P.O.W., and ship owner with Capt. Cornelius Grinnell. The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919 542
  • JAVA, First Concordia YawlConcordia was a Howland company Photographer: Norman Fortier NBWM #2004.11.1269.1 543
  • Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr. Partners in the Concordia Co., Inc. (Partial Article) (Partial Article) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=80613550Photographer: Norman Fortier NBWM #2004.11.1267 Waldo & Llewellyn, Jr. were great, great, great JAVA, the First Concordia Yawl grandsons of Capt. Cornelius Howland, whose birth is “Round Hill Point in far background.” listed in the Capt. Grinnell’s 1785 bible (slide 420). 544
  • JAVA, the First Concordia Yawl Photographer: Norman Fortier NBWM #2004.11.7647.1 545
  • NBWM #1981.80.131.5Photographer: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.112 Untitled 546
  • Pg. 1 Pg. 9 Pg. 42Gift of Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr. ODHS #766 NBWM 1973.27.2 1852-1855 Log of Ship JAVA Waldo & Llewellyn Howland, Jr. also gave the 1845-1848 logbook of the GEORGE & SUSAN (NBWM 1973.27.1). 547
  • Irving & Joanna Grinnell, children of Moses & Julia http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/teachinger/q-and-a/q8-newsarticle.cfm The Town of Irvington and Irving Grinnell were named after Washington Irving, who was Irving Grinnell’s great uncle.Reflections on a River edited by Holly Wahlberg, Dutchess County Historical Society, 2009, pgs. 167-172 548
  • Irving Grinnell Son of Moses & JuliaCousin of Franklin Delano Roosevelt The Howland Heirs, by Wm. M. Emery Irving & Joanna attended Franklin & Eleanor Roosevelt’s wedding (F.D.R. was a cousin). According to The History of the New York Yacht Club by J. Parkinson, Jr., Irving was never commodore of the N.Y.Y.C.; but he was a fleet captain (slide 516). His father Moses, however, was elected commodore in 1859 but declined Reflections on a River edited by Holly Wahlberg, 2009, pg. 171 (slide 515). Netherwood was near Hyde Park and the Roosevelts. 549
  • Grinnell Library, Wappinger Falls, NY Irving Grinnell & Grinnell Library “It all goes back to Irving Grinnell. Born in 1839 into a prosperous New York City family, he retired young to lead the life of a gentleman of leisure on his estate, Netherwood, located in what is now Bowdoin Park. Grinnell took a Victorian philanthropist’s interest in Wappingers Falls… By 1880 the library was outgrowing its space and was in perpetual need of funds. A building fund was started, but it didn’t take off until 1884 when Grinnell held a Lawn Party and a Union Fair was held at Zion [Episcopal] Church, both in aid of the library. The lot at the corner of East Main and Spring Streets was purchased in 1886; construction began and was completed in 1887. Grinnell hired a Below: Irving’s Netherwood Estate New York City architect, and supplied a list of architectural features he wanted to include. The tower is modeled after one he saw in St. Battenberg, Switzerland, and the way the second story overhangs the first recalls buildings he liked in Chester, England.” http://www.grinnell-library.org/Hudson River I. Grinnell Reflections on a River edited by Holly Wahlberg, 2009, pg. 171 550
  • Irving Grinnell Lawrence Grinnell, Jr. America’s Cup Committee: New York Yacht Club, 1899 Commodore: New Bedford Yacht Club Founding Commodore: New Hamburg Yacht Club Son of Frederick Grinnell Son of Moses Grinnell Great Grandson of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.http://nhyc1869.com/history.htm The New Bedford Yacht Club: L. Howland III, p. 58 (detail) New Hamburg Yacht Club “… incorporated on December 20th 1869 by the local millionaires, river captains and village residents as the ‘New Hamburgh Ice Yacht Club’. It is considered the 6th oldest yacht club in the United States… Irving Grinnell was the first Commodore and the leading spirit of the original club. He was a local millionaire who owned a [Hudson] river-front estate with a boat house that was a short distance south of Third Point. For some years the Grinnell boathouse was used as the yacht clubs headquarters. The Grinnell estate and the adjoining estate of Temple Bowdoin, another early member, is now known as Bowdoin Park of Dutchess County.” http://www.co.dutchess.ny.us/countygov/departments/dpw-parks/ppbowdoin.htm 551
  • Henry’s son donated The Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin to the New York Yacht Club where Henry & Moses had been members. NBWM Archives 552
  • Daughter of Moses GrinnellThe Bowdoin Family, by Russell E. Train (pages 55-75 are primarily about the Grinnells & Howlands) 553
  • Julia below: daughter of Moses H. Grinnell & wife of George S. Bowdoin The Howland Heirs, by William Emery, 1919, p. 257The Bowdoin Family, by Russell E. Train 554
  • Maine Historic Preservation Commission La Rochelle: Bar Harbor Cottage of Julia Irving Grinnell Bowdoin Daughter of Moses & Sister of Irvinghttp://books.google.com/books?id=rnkAAAAAYAAJ&dq=george%20bowdoin%20bar%20harbor&pg=PA247#v=onepage&q=george%20bowdoin%20bar%20harbor&f=false 555
  • Summer Home of Julia Irving Grinnell Bowdoin “One of the Morgan partners at Bar Harbor was George S. Bowdoin, a grandson of Alexander Hamilton—another of whose grandchildren was married to Morgan’s son-in-law Pierson Hamilton, also a partner in the bank, also a BarHarbor summer resident. Mrs. Bowdoin, the former Julia Irving Grinnell, was the great niece of Washington Irving…” http://downeastdilettante.wordpress.com/category/j-p-morgan/ 556
  • La Rochelle: Bar Harbor Home of Julia Grinnell Bowdoin “During the gilded age, when the remote Maine resort of Bar Harbor was considered second only to Newport on the summer social tour, partners in the Morgan Bank, or ‘Morgan Men’, as they were known, were mainstays of the opulent summer community. It was understandable. Their employer had long and deep ties to the resort— J.P. Morgan’s wife, the former Frances Tracy, had summered there since childhood, when Bar Harbor was still called Eden and had returned most summers since. The great banker, more restless, traveled back and forth on his yacht CORSAIR, an imperial presence on the social scene. Louis Auchincloss, in A Voice From Old New York, remembered his parents, who summered in Bar Harbor, cancelling a previous social engagement when summoned to dine with Morgan aboard CORSAIR. When young Auchincloss questioned his parents—his father did a great deal of business with the Morgan firm —about throwing over their intended hostess for that evening, his mother simply told him that ‘someday you will understand’.” http://downeastdilettante.wordpress.com/category/j-p-morgan/ 557
  • La Rochelle: Bar Harbor Home of Julia Grinnell BowdoinGranddaughter of Capt. Cornelius, a “poor boy” and a private in the Revolutionary War (slide 414). http://downeastdilettante.wordpress.com/category/j-p-morgan/ 558
  • La Rochelle, Bar Harbor “In 1901 Bowdoin purchased an in-town shorefront lot on West Street, and commissioned a cottage from architects Andrews, Jacques & Rantoul. Completed in 1903, the house , curiously urban in that way of houses in grand resorts—were it not for the ocean behind it, one could imagine this house in Kalorama—was a blend of French Renaissance & Georgian, built of brick and Indiana limestone. Large (Some 35 rooms on four levels) but not vast, elegant but not opulent, it was the first major brick house in a resort hitherto filled mostly with massive stone, shingle and stucco cottages. The new cottage was called ‘La Rochelle’ after the Bowdoin family’s ancestral town in France.”“A small circular vestibule opens under the curveddouble stairs and looks ahead to French doors to theocean terrace, and a 90 foot cross hall.” http://downeastdilettante.wordpress.com/category/j-p-morgan/ 559
  • La Rochelle, Bar HarborLa Rochelle Side Terrace: “The eastern end of Bar Island… is visible on the right.” http://downeastdilettante.wordpress.com/category/j-p-morgan/ 560
  • Grinnells, J. P. Morgan, & CORSAIR IJ. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. 561
  • Grinnells, J. P. Morgan, & CORSAIR I J. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. 562
  • Grinnells, J. P. Morgan, & CORSAIR IJ. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. J. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. 563
  • Grinnells, J. P. Morgan, & CORSAIR I J. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. 564
  • Grinnells, J. P. Morgan, & CORSAIR I J. Pierpont Morgan: An Intimate Portrait by Herbert L. Satterlee, The Macmillan Co. 565
  • George S. Bowdoin, Philanthropist Stable: 149 East 38th Street Irving Grinnell’s Netherwood property became part of Bowdoin Park. Reflections on a River, Dutchess County Historical Society, 2009, pg. 173 “The stable was purchased in 1907 by George S. Bowdoin who lived nearby at 39 Park Avenue and East 36th Street. Bowdoin’s daughter, Edith inherited the building from her father and had it converted to a garage in 1918.” Like the Manhattan mansions of Henry and Moses, the main house did not survive.Architect: Ralph S. Townsend http://library.gc.cuny.edu/murrayhill/items/show/19 http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/reports/bowdoin.pdf 566
  • Chapter VI. Homes of Old Dartmouth Relatives NBWM #2000.100.3012 Round Hill Homestead, Birthplace of Sylvia (Howland) GrinnellSylvia Howland, wife of Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, was born here on Aug. 4, 1765. She came from a Quaker family that moved to Dartmouthfrom Duxbury in the 1650’s. The land was purchased by Henry Howland, brother of pilgrim John Howland. Henry died in 1671, and hisson Zoeth (1636-1676) was killed by Indians in King Phillip’s War. The house was built by Zoeth’s son, Benjamin (1659-1727). It waspassed on to Barnabas (1699-1773) and then to the senior Gideon Howland (1734-1823), who was Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s father. 567
  • Artist: William Allen Wall NBWM #1929.7.1 Artist: William Allen Wall NBWM #1929.7.2 Abraham Russell Sarah Russell 1756-1837 1762-1849 Joseph Grinnell’s father-in-law Joseph Grinnell’s mother-in-law 568
  • Abraham & Sarah Russell Joseph Grinnell’s in-laws N.E.H.G.S., by B.B. Russell, 1904, p. 17 & 18NBWM #300.83.1 The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 247 NBWM #300.83.3 As can be seen above, Joseph Grinnell married Sarah and Abraham’s daughter, Sarah R. Russell. Thus, Joseph Grinnell and Joseph S. Russell were brothers-in-law. The artist, Joseph S. Russell (1795-1860) was Abraham & Sarah’s son. Around 1818, Joseph Russell moved to Philadelphia, where his mother was born. He sold whale oil & candles and frequently returned to New Bedford. 569
  • NBWM #2000.100.82.95 Home of Abraham & Sarah S. RussellAbraham and Sarah Russell started the first stage from New Bedford to Boston, and they were owners of ten ships. Joseph Grinnell married their daughter,Sarah R. Russell (1788-1862). Note in negative sleeve reads: “This house was built in 1803 by Abraham Russell. It stood on County St. at the head of UnionSt. It was moved to make room for Union St. between 1825-1930 to the NW corner of Union & Orchard St.” (DEMOLISHED 1904) 570
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1962.4.11 “Dwelling of Abraham Russell Esq., New Bedford”“The Rotches acquired a lot of the Russell land in 1819 because in 1815, during the War of 1812, Abraham Russell had to take out a five-yearmortgage on his property to cover his business expenses, and William Rotch, Sr. provided most of the money for the mortgage. At the end of thefive-year period Russell was unable to meet his debt, and so the mortgage was foreclosed and Rotch [a fellow Quaker] came intro possession ofmuch of the old Russell property. Joseph Grinnell, son-in-law of Russell, as trustee under the will, sold the Russell mansion to James Rider.” New Bedford: A Pictorial History, by Judith Boss & Joseph Thomas: 1983, p. 34 571
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1962.4.9 “Stable of Abm Russell, Esq. about the year 1810” 572
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1978.26.4 “Mr. Abm Russells Stable New Bedford” 573
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell, 1848 NBWM #1962.4.10 “South Parlor of Ab’m Russell, Esq. New Bedford” The artist, Joseph S. Russell (1795-1860), was Abraham & Sarah’s son and Joseph Grinnell’s brother-in-law. 574
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell, c. 1814 NBWM #1962.4.7 “Original Residence of Ab’m Russell, C. 1804” 575
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1978.26.2 “New Bedford Market Place, 1848” 576
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1978.26.6 “Congregational Church, Tiverton, R.I.” Tiverton & Little Compton were also part of the original Dartmouth Purchase 577
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1962.4.6 “Old Baptist Church Longhill near Dr. Whitridges, Tiverton” 578
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell, c. 1814 NBWM #1962.4.2 “Dr. Whitridges Residence, Tiverton, R. I.” 579
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell, c. 1814 NBWM #1962.4.8 “North Parlour of Dr. Whitridges, Tiverton R. I.” Old Dartmouth originally included New Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, Westport, and parts of Tiverton and Little Compton. “Tiverton was originally incorporated in 1694, as part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. A long boundary dispute between Rhode Island and Massachusetts was settled in 1746, and Tiverton ... was annexed to Rhode Island. The town was incorporated in 1747.” http://www.tiverton.ri.gov/town/history.html http://www.little-compton.com/about.php 580
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1962.4.1 “Old Beach Tree in Woods in back of Dr Whitridges” 581
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell, c. 1809 NBWM #1978.10 “Penny Wing School House” 582
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1978.26.1 “Charley & Harrys Great Grandfather Russells farmyard as it was in 1807.” 583
  • Artist: Joseph S. Russell NBWM #1962.4.18 “Old Residence of T.B. Freeman, 10th and Chestnut Streets” Around 1818, Joseph Russell moved to Philadelphia, where his mother was born and where this painting was created. Joseph sold whale oil & candles and frequently returned to New Bedford. 584
  • Photo: Thomas Edward Mulligan White NBWM #2000.100.90.12 Gilbert Russell House61 South Sixth Street, built 1829. Gilbert was a brother of Abraham Russell. “Gilbert Russell… was the son of New Bedford founder Joseph RussellIII. Gilbert also built the William Tallman Russell House for his son and gave the land for the Cornelius Grinnell and William Swain mansions to hissons-in-law.” (Clayton & Whitley) Today, Gilbert’s house is separated from son William’s (slide 606) by a small house on a 62 ft. wide lot. 585
  • Gilbert & Lydia Russell Cornelius, Jr., Sylvia, & Moses married children of Gilbert & Lydia Russell The Howland Heirs by W.M. Emery, p. 247Gilbert & Lydia Russell are buried about 44 ft. fromCornelius & Silvia Grinnell. As can be read above, fourmarriages took place between their children. Gilbert wasan owner of the following: ship ACTIVE, ship ACUSHNET(with Cornelius Grinnell, Jame Howland, WilliamHowland, etc.), ship BRISTOL, sloop HANOVER, shipINDIA, (with brothers Joseph, James M., Henry, & MosesGrinnell), ship OTHELLO, sloop PRESIDENT, shipRICHMOND, ship TIMOLEON, and ship VANCOUVER. Russell Portraits in StorageThe below portraits of Gilbert & Lydia Russell weregiven to the museum by Emily Grinnell, sister of PeterS. Grinnell. They were probably passed down to Emilythrough Cornelius, Jr., Sylvia, Jr., or Moses Grinnell,who all married children of Gilbert & Lydia (above).Brass plaque reads: Gilbert Russell/ Aug. 1760 – Aug. 1829 NBWM #1993.46.1Plaque reads: Lydia Tallman/ Sept. 30, 1759 – Sept. 11, 1840 Lydia Russell NBWM #1993.46.2 586
  • Russell Warren, ArchitectRussell Warren: in the coastal towns of southeastern new england: by Prof. Thomas W. Puryea, 1982, p. 10. “The first member of the New Bedford community to engage Russell Warren was Joseph Grinnell.” 587
  • Designed by Russell Warren NBWM #2000.100.3670 Hon. Joseph Grinnell MansionThis is how the mansion looked when Joseph adopted his niece, Cornelia. The third story was added after Joseph died. Today, he is rememberedfor the Grinnell Congregate Home and hosting Abraham Lincoln when he spoke in New Bedford on Sept. 15, 1848 (they were both members ofthe Whig Party). Abraham Lincoln’s stay at Joseph’s home clearly illustrated Joseph’s strong anti-slavery beliefs despite some scurrilous remarksmade by his business rival, the ultra-rich Edward “Black Hawk” Robinson. Unfortunately, these erroneous remarks were reported in The NewBedford Mercury. It is believed that the white horse in the photo belonged to Morgan Rotch who married Josephine Grinnell (334). 588
  • Photo: Joseph G. Tirrell, c. 1895 NBWM # 2000.100.85.100 John Avery Parker Mansion (DEMOLISHED, 1903)County Street, Built 1832-34. Designed by Russell Warren. Francis Howland, son of Capt. Joseph Howland and nephew of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell,married John Avery Parker’s daughter, Mary. Mr. Parker was president of the Bedford Commercial Bank and Cornelius Grinnell was a director when itopened in 1816. In 1825 John Avery Parker left the Bedford Bank and became one of the founders and president of the Merchants Bank. Eventually, hebecame the richest man in New Bedford; and his mansion is believed to have been largest Greek Revival home in the country at the time it was built. 589
  • Courtesy of Spinner Publications: KF-D 00148 Charles W. Morgan Mansion (DEMOLISHED 1904)Head of William Street. Charles Morgan owned the famous whaling ship that still carries his name at Mystic Seaport. He was one of many NewBedford Quakers who became Unitarians, and he had a pew directly across the aisle from Joseph and Moses (slide 480). Morgan Rotch was CharlesW. Morgan’s grandson, and he married Josephine Grinnell on Dec. 4, 1879. Josephine was a great granddaughter of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia. 590
  • Double Bank Building Designed by Russell Warren “Home of Merchants Bank on the south and Mechanics Bank on the north. On Water Street at the foot of William Street, New Bedford.”Creator: Adams, Stephen F. NBWM #2000.100.441.43 591
  • Old Dartmouth Photographs by Palmer & Worth Many of the architectural photos in this presentation came from this unpublished book by Fred W. Palmer and Henry B. Worth. It is now in the New Bedford Whaling Museum.Towns of Old Dartmouth Little Compton and Tiverton were originally part of Old Dartmouth. 592
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.213 Anthony-Delano Mansion (DEMOLISHED)The Joseph R. Anthony Mansion “radically changed” from a Greek Revival mansion like Joseph Grinnell’s (slide 460) after it was purchased by Capt.Joseph C. Delano. “Located in the center of the square bounded by Cottage, Hawthorn, Orchard & Grove Streets, New Bedford.” (map, slide 471) Thus,this property was directly to the west of the estates of Joseph and Cornelius, Jr., who Joseph Anthony was related to by marriage (slide 586). 593
  • Saved by WHALEPhoto: Fred Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.18 Home of John & Sarah Howland, Jr. 38 Sixth St., northeast corner of Sixth and Madison Streets, built in 1834. 594
  • Artist: William A. Wall, c. 1840 NBWM #1986.2.1 The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 290 Artist: William A. Wall, c. 1840 NBWM #1986.2.2 John Howland, Jr. Sarah (Howland) Howland 1782-1852 1786-1875 Son of John & Reliance Howland Daughter of Capt. William & Abigail Howland Brother & partner of James Howland II Niece of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell Partner of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. (slide 475) Sarah Howland (1786-1875) was a niece of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell and daughter of Capt. William Howland (1756-1840). Sarah’s father William was Capt. Grinnell’s partner in the firm of Howland & Grinnell when it was founded in Jan. 1804 (slide 443). John Howland, Jr. was a partner with his brother James in J. & J. Howland. They owned several vessels and a candleworks with Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. Note: John & Sarah were not first cousins. The Howlands were a very old and large Dartmouth family, and it was not uncommon for one Howland to marry another Howland, who they were not directly related to. After years of neglect and a serious fire, John & Sarah’s home (previous slide) was recently saved from demolition by WHALE. 595
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.257 Saved by WHALE Home of John & Sarah Howland, Jr. 38 Sixth St., northeast corner of Sixth and Madison Streets, built in 1834. 596
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.257 Home of William H. & Ruth Allen 38 Seventh St., south side of School St. between 7th and 6th Streets. William was the son of James Allen and Sarah Howland (1767-1836). Sarah Howland was Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s sister. William’s brother Gideon owned an almost identical mansion directly behind (next slide), and his destroyed chimneys are barely visible in the haze on the left. 597
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.258 Gideon & Hannah Allen House 23 Sixth St., southwest corner of Sixth Street and School Street, built in 1830. Gideon (1791-1878) and his brother William H. were grandsons of Sylvia Grinnell’s father, Gideon Howland. (SEVERELY ALTERED) The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 291 598
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 290 William H. Allen was the owner of the beautiful brick mansion at 38 7th St. (slide 597). He and Joseph Grinnell were first cousins, and they both lived for 97 years! NBWM: #1984.32.1 William Howland AllenNephew of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell 599
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.256 Home of George Howland, Jr.37 Sixth St. Northwest corner of Sixth and Madison. Like John Howland, Jr. and Mayor Abraham Howland, George Howland, Jr. was not a descendantof Gideon Howland. Thus, he was not directly related to Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell; and his accomplishments are not included in this presentation. 600
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.215 Charles Russell Mansion (& Hetty Green)1061 Pleasant St. According to Fred Palmer & Henry Worth, this house “…was built by Charles Russell in 1831. In 1833 he failed and theproperty was conveyed to the local banks, and later to Sylvia Ann Howland… Edward Mott Robinson occupied the house for nine yearsfrom 1835.” Hetty was Edward “Black Hawk” Robinson’s daughter. She was born in 1834 and lived here until 1842. She was thegranddaughter of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s brother, Gideon Howland (Jr.). (ALTERED to hospital & convent) 601
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.216 Rodman-Howland Mansion 388 County St., built in 1833, designed by Russell Warren. Owned by William R. Rodman & Mayor Abraham H. Howland. More info: http://www.historic-structures.com/ma/new_bedford/rodman_house.php 602
  • Abraham HowlandFirst Mayor of New Bedford 1847-1851Son of Capt. Weston & Abigail Howland Artist Unknown NBWM #1931.10.2 603
  • Photo: minkstudios Rodman-Howland MansionAcross County Street from the Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. House. Except for a higher level of ornamentation, it is very similar to Joseph Grinnell’sMansion and was designed by the same architect, Russell Warren. Abraham Howland was Joseph’s distant cousin and political rival (slide 494+). 604
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 182Photo: minkstudios Home of Capt. Cornelius Howland, Jr. 382 County St., built 1845. He was the son of Capt. Cornelius Howland and a nephew of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell. This house is directly across the street from Cornelius, Jr. & Joseph Grinnell, his first cousins. As can be seen to the left, this house is next door to the Rodman-Howland Mansion. To save the Rodman-Howland Mansion from demolition in 1907, it was purchased by the heirs of Frederick Grinnell and Horatio Hathaway, who had lived across the street in the homes of Joseph and Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. 605
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, p. 248 Saved by WHALEPhoto: J. Grinnell Home of William T. & Sylvia (Grinnell) Russell 66 Russell St., built 1822. Sylvia was a daughter of Cornelius & Sylvia Grinnell, and she married William Tallman Russell (1788-1872). This house is about one block east of Sylvia’s brothers Joseph and Cornelius, Jr. on County St., and it is across the street from her father-in-law Gilbert Russell at 61 So. Sixth St. William was the brother of Eliza and Susan Russell, who both married Cornelius, Jr. William, Eliza, and Susan were children of Gilbert Russell, the son of Joseph Russell who was one of the original settlers of New Bedford. 606
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm. Emery, p. 251Photo by J. Grinnell Home of Lawrence & Rebecca Grinnell 76 Cottage St., built 1846. Lawrence was a son of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza. After his father died in 1830, Lawrence took over his business as owner/agent of the MINERVA and EUPHRATES (slide 474), and he became very successful in marine insurance. His grandfather, Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, had been a founding director of the Bedford Bank in 1803 and the Bedford Marine Ins. Co. in 1805. Lawrence & Rebecca were the parents of Frederick Grinnell, who invented the Grinnell automatic fire extinguisher. 607
  • Lawrence & Rebecca (Williams) Grinnell Given by Lawrence Grinnell Knowles, Jr. NBWM #2012.21.2 & #2012.21.3A May 9, 1891 Lawrence Grinnell letter to Charles H. Grinnell, Tacoma,Wash. is at slide 682+. Charles inherited Cornelius Grinnell’s 1785 bible. 608
  • (length: 7 ‘ 1”) NBWM #1979.53.4 Business Signs Given by Peter S. Grinnell Peter was a great grandson of Lawrence Grinnell.(length: ?) NBWM #1979.33 609
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, p. 252Photo: J. Grinnell Home of Joseph G. & Lydia Grinnell 89 Hawthorn St., built 1841. Joseph G. was a son of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza. In addition to his iron business, Joseph G. was in the insurance business with his brother Lawrence. The two brothers built very similar houses, which are about two blocks from the Joseph Grinnell Mansion. They also shared a pew almost directly across from their Uncle Joe when the Unitarian Church was built in 1838 (slide 481+). 610
  • The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, p. 223Photo: minkstudios.com Home of Matthew & Rachel Howland 81 Hawthorn St., built 1840. Matthew Howland was Capt. Cornelius Howland’s grandson and a grand nephew of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell. Matthew and Joseph G. were both great grandsons of the senior Gideon Howland (1734-1823); and thus, they were “second” cousins. This house was significantly altered by William W. Crapo, who wrote the introduction to the The Howland Heirs. Mr. Crapo was an attorney and president of the New Bedford Institution of Savings, which Cornelius Grinnell had been an incorporator of in 1825. 611
  • Photo by J. Grinnell Grinnell & Howland Cousins and Neighbors Joseph G. Grinnell and Matthew Howland were both great grandsons of Gideon Howland (Sr.) of Round Hill Farm. 612
  • Artist: Auguste Edouart, c. 1842 Rachel & Matthew’s children: NBWM #2000.100.376 NBWM #1983.36.1 & 2 Matthew Howland Silhouettes given by Waldo Howland Rachel Howland 1814-1884 Quaker Minister Auguste Edouart: “…a silhouette artist called Auguste Edouart… was born in France in 1789. Left fairly early in his career and made a great name for himself as a silhouette artist in London and in Scotland and other places in the British Isles. In 1838, he came to New York, and he was the most prolific and most successful of all silhouette artists, probably for all time. And his goal was to create silhouette portraits of the most notable Americans that he could find.” Sotheby’s 613
  • Rachel S. Howland, Quaker Minister The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 197Bierstadt Brothers #1983.36.7.4Bierstadt Brothers #1983.36.7.3 NBWM #1983.36.7.8 Author: Bruce Barnes (Partial Article} 614
  • NBWM #1983.36.7.16 Rachel Howland & Family Home of William D. & Caroline Howland52 Ash St, built 1884. William D. was Matthew Howland’s son, and Matthew lived around thecorner at 81 Hawthorn St. William was the father of the first Llewellyn Howland. As can beseen in the 1881 map (slide 471), this mansion and almost all the houses in this presentation arewithin two blocks of the original estates of Joseph and Cornelius, Jr. Fortunately, this andmany other homes have been saved and restored in this wonderful New Bedford neighborhood. The Howland Heirs: Wm Emery, 1919, p. 205 615
  • Photo by J. Grinnell Home of Peleg C. Howland 95 Madison St., built 1875. Peleg C. Howland was the grandson of Peleg Howland (1759-1847). Peleg (Sr.) was a brother of Isaac Howland, Jr., one of the most successful whaling merchants in New Bedford. They were great grandsons of Benjamin Howland (1659-1727), the builder of Round Hill Farm. Peleg C. Howland devoted his career to the Merchants Bank and rose to the top. 616
  • Photographer: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.229 William J. Rotch Gothic Cottage http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/90042726 617
  • Grinnell & Rotch Marriage NBWM #2000.100.3004 Morgan & Josephine (Grinnell) Rotch Arthur & Emily Home of Morgan & Josephine (Grinnell) Rotch19 Irving Street, built 1846. The Rotchs were neighbors and business associates of the Grinnells &Howlands (slides 10-17 and 431+). Morgan Rotch married Josephine G. Grinnell, who was JosephGrinnell’s grand niece. Josephine & Morgan lived in this home and are buried in the Grinnell familyplot. In addition to being a mayor of New Bedford, William J. was a director of several companiesincluding the Wamsutta Mills. This “cottage” is about two blocks from the Joseph Grinnell Mansion(map, slide 471). It was designed by Alexander Jackson Davis, who designed Jay Gould’s Lyndhurstcastle that was next door to Moses Grinnell’s estate in Irvington, N.Y. (slides 214 & 215). The Rotches by John M. Bullard, pgs. 105-110 The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, p. 266 618
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/90042726 William J. Rotch Gothic Cottage Architect: Alexander Jackson Davis, 1845 Preserved by John Bullard, 1st Agent/Director of WHALE 619
  • Saved by WHALEPhoto: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.208 Rotch-Jones-Duff House 396 County St. Built c. 1833 for Abolitionist William Rotch, Jr., who had employed Capt. Cornelius Grinnell on his ship BEDFORD in 1795. The Rotch family were founders of the whaling industry in New Bedford. In addition to running the family business, William Rotch, Jr. became president of the New Bedford Institution for Saving and was one of the most prominent abolitionists in the city. This house is in its original condition and open to the public. It was built at the same time as the Joseph Grinnell Mansion at 379 County St. William Rotch was the grandfather of Morgan Rotch who married Josephine Grinnell, a great grand daughter of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia. William Rotch, Jr. also employed Capt. Preserved Fish in the 1790’s. Captains Grinnell & Fish founded Fish & Grinnell in 1815, which evolved into Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in 1833. 620
  • Chapter VII: CHARLES W. MORGAN, Col. Green, & Historic Preservation Creator: Wilbar, Charles Baker NBWM #2003.99.1 CHARLES W. MORGAN Enshrined at the Howland Homestead, Round Hill, Dartmouth, 1925-1941 621
  • Fortune of Isaac Howland, Jr. Inherited by Gideon Howland’s granddaughters: Sylvia Ann Howland & Abby (Howland) Robinson http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbein00emer The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, p. 14http://archive.org/details/howlandheirsbein00emer The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, p. 30 The Howland Heirs: William M. Emery, 1919, p. 59 622
  • Photo: Fred W. Palmer NBWM # 2000.100.80.198 NBWM O.D.H.S. Scrapbook 7, pg. 37 Gideon Howland (Jr.) MansionBuilt around 1795 for Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s brother, GideonHowland, Jr. He was the highly successful father of the wealthy SylviaAnn Howland and grandfather of Hetty Green, the richest woman in thecountry. Gideon Howland (Sr.) lived his entire life at Round Hill Farm,and he was not a wealthy ship owner like his son and namesake.Contrary to popular belief, he did not build this mansion and no greatwealth nor any ships were listed in the will of Gideon (Sr.) according tothe copy published in The Howland Heirs. (DEMOLISHED) Right: The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 354 623
  • Photo: minkstudios Gideon Howland (Jr.) & Daughters: Abby & Sylvia AnnThe Ship Registers of New Bedford state that Gideon (Jr.) was master and owner of the Ship TIMOLEON (S.R.N.B. #3025)and that he was an owner of owned 41 other ships. With his father-in-law, Isaac Howland, Jr., he founded the fortune thatwas inherited by his daughter Sylvia Ann and granddaughter Hetty Green. Sylvia Ann Howland (1806-1865) became amulti-millionaire and gave $200,000 to the city and $70,000 to charities. Daughter Abby Slocum Howland (1809-1860)married Edward Mott Robinson, who became one of the richest men in New Bedford. A great deal of inaccuracy has arisenfrom the fact that Gideon, Jr. dropped the “Jr.” from his name when his father died, as was the custom of the time. 624
  • NBWM #1937.47 Philanthropist Sylvia Ann Howland Sylvia Ann Howland Trust Niece of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell William M. Emery, 1919 Please note that Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell did not inherit any of the “Howland Fortune” because she died in 1837. However, her great, great granddaughter, who was named Sylvia Howland Grinnell (born in 1887 & alive in 1919), inherited 1/1080. Capt. Cornelius Grinnell does not seem to have inherited anything from anyone, making him the veritable “self-made man”. 625
  • Photographer: Tirrell, Joseph G. NBWM #2000.100.85.106 New Bedford Library Location of the Sylvia Ann Howland Plaque Designed by Russell Warren, who also designed the Joseph Grinnell Mansion, Rodman-Howland Mansion, Double Bank Building, and many other Greek revival buildings in New Bedford, Providence, Newport, and Fall River (slides 587 & 673). 626
  • The above were highly significant gifts in 1865. In 1850, after Joseph Grinnell had made his fortune in New York shipping, built his mansion on County St., become a bank president, congressman, rail road president, and president of Wamsutta Mills, his entire net worth was estimated at justStandard-Times Collection NBWM #1981.61.272 $100,000 in Rich Men of Massachusetts. Home of Sylvia Ann Howland, Aunt of Hetty Green County Street, corner of William St. Built c. 1822 for Thomas Rotch; sold to Sylvia Ann Howland in 1848; and inherited by Hetty Green in 1868. Several documents prove that Hetty was not married here, as the myth goes. According to The Witch of Wall Street: “The wedding [Hetty’s] occurred one day that was hot and sultry in New York. It was July 11, 1867… The ceremony was performed in the residence of her kinsman, Henry Grinnell, in 17 Bond Street, then a fashionable address in the metropolis.” Henry and his siblings were first cousins of Sylvia Ann Howland, who was the daughter of their “Uncle Gid”, as he was familiarly known. 627
  • Creator: Arthur F. Packard, c. 1918 NBWM 2000.100.1711 “Last of The Whaling Fleet”, WANDERER & CHARLES W. MORGAN One was Preserved & One was Destroyed 628
  • “WANDERER before the wind” Wreck of the WANDERER Creator: Church, Albert Cook Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #1991.6.2 NBWM #2000.100.86.1 (detail) 629
  • “Whaling bark WANDERER wreck” “WANDERER on the Rocks” Creator: Albert Cook Church Creator: Ashley, Clifford Warren, 1925 NBWM #2000.100.1042 NBWM #1998.34 This wreck represented the death of the American Whaling Industry, which was the basis of the Howland-Green Fortune 630
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.744 CHARLES W. MORGAN SURVIVED 631
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN “Enshrined”& WANDERER Mast at Round HillNBWM #2000.100.1266 NBWM #1995.9.1635 WANDERER spar/mast from Round Hill given by Waldo Howland to NBWM (#1966.41). NBWM recently gave it to the Mattapoisett Historical Society where the WANDERER was built (slide 709). 632
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN Preserved at Round Hill“The CHARLES W. MORGAN is the last surviving woodenwhaling ship from the great days of sail. Built in 1841 inNew Bedford, MA, the Morgan had a successful 80-yearwhaling career. She made 37 voyages before retiring in1921, and was preserved as an exhibit through the effortsof a number of dedicated citizens. After being on displayin South Dartmouth, MA, until 1941, she came to MysticSeaport, where each year thousands of visitors walk herdecks and hear the fascinating story of her career as awhaling vessel, historic exhibit, film and media star, anda porthole into Americas rich history.” http://www.mysticseaport.org The CHARLES W. MORGAN was a Howland ship (slide 647); and one of the owners was Edward M. Robinson, the husband of Abby Howland and father of Hetty Green. WANDERER “Last whaling ship to sail from New Bedford. On Wanderers last voyage (1924), the vessel anchored off Marthas Vineyard to wait out an approaching storm. During the night the anchor let go and the ship was ultimately destroyed on the rocks.” http://www.mattapoisetthistoricalsociety.org/whalingships_history.htmNBWM #2000.100.1265 633
  • NBWM #1981.34.176 Howland Homestead, Round Hill, DartmouthThis property was purchased by Henry Howland (died 1671), brother of pilgrim John Howland. Henry’s son, Zoeth(1636-76), was killed by Indians in King Phillip’s War; and the house was built by Zoeth’s son, Benjamin (1659-1727). Itwas passed on to Barnabas (1699-1773) and Gideon Howland (1734-1823), who was Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s father. Itwas then inherited by Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s grand niece, Hetty Green. She passed it on to her son, Colonel Green. 634
  • Howland Homestead Location CHARLES W. MORGAN wharf locationPhotographer: Norman Fortier NBWM #: 2004.11.15470 (detail) Round Hill Farm Colonel Edward Howland Robinson Green’s Estate The CHARLES W. MORGAN was birthed on the shore to the far left of the mansion. 635
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.139.a CHARLES W. MORGAN “at Round Hill dedication [July 21, 1926] with house flags of former NB whaling merchants flying” 636
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN Dedication at Round Hillby Clifford Warren Ashley, (dedication took place on July 21, 1926) New Bedford Whaling Museum #2001.100.4347 637
  • Hetty Howland Robinson Green Col. Edward Howland Robinson Green“On July 3, 1916, just a few months short of her 82nd birthday, Hetty Green died in “Edward Howland Robinson Green or Colonel Green (1868 –her son’s house on West 91 Street. Her estate was estimated to be close to $200 1936) in his electric car operating his radio receivingmillion at the time – or an estimated $17 billion in today’s dollars. (J.P. Morgan’s apparatus, probably near his home on Buzzards Bay inestate at the time of his death three years before was approximately $80 million.) She Massachusetts. Green was son of Hetty Green (the “Witch ofhad spent her entire life in pursuit of money. She bought nothing for herself or her Wall Street”), said to be the wealthiest woman in the world.children. She gave nothing away. She just watched her fortune grow and grow at the Col. Green was quite interested in radio communication, andexpense of virtually everything else in her life except her beloved little dog Curtis, on account of a leg amputation he suffered as a child, he camewhose name she sometimes used on her front door to throw tax agents off her trail.” to own several specially equipped vehicles including this one.”http://www.newyorksocialdiary.com/node/2460 http://ohtm.org/blg/collections/automobiles/1914-rauch/ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=2793 638
  • Round Hill 1973 Col. Green was the great grandson of Gideon Howland, Jr. and son of Hetty Green. He inherited half of his mother’s estate including the Howland Homestead old Howland homestead at Round Hill. He died in 1936 and left his entire estate to his sister, Sylvia Green Wilks. This land was owned CHARLES W. MORGAN by the Howland family from c. Wharf 1660 until Sylvia gave it to MIT in 1948. In 1968, the Town of Dartmouth bought 37 acres for Col. Green’s Mansion $200,000 including the beach on the left. Today, there are 77 homes on the remainder of this property and 16 condos in the mansion. Hetty Green Granddaughter of Gideon Howland, Jr.COLONEL EDWARD HOWLAND ROBINSON GREEN AND THE WORLD HE CREATED AT ROUND HILL by Barbara Fortin, p. 85 NBWM #2004.73.104.a Standard-Times Collection 639
  • Whaling Enshrined, Inc. NBWM #2000.100.67 “CHARLES W. MORGAN - at wharf with full sail set: 1925” To the right is Salters Pt., which was part of the original Howland Farm. 640
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #1991.42.14 “CHARLES W. MORGAN alight at night, Round Hill” 641
  • Photo: Martin, Joseph S.Tirrell, Joseph G. NBWM #2000.100.1270 CHARLES W. MORGAN at Round Hill 642
  • Collection: Kendall - Martin NBWM #M-489a “The Colonel loved spending money as much as his mother loved hoarding it.” As evidenced by the two cars on the right, the Colonel usually had his cars built taller than normal to improve access for his cork leg. 643
  • NBWM #1965.54.2.39 “CHARLES W. MORGAN at Round Hill”Colonel Green’s private airport hanger in background to left. 644
  • NBWM #2000.100.372“CHARLES W. MORGAN at Colonel Green’s, Round Hill” 645
  • Photographer: Leslie Jones Boston Public LibraryWANDERER Mast “Whaleship CHARLES W. MORGAN at Round Hill…, 1929” Blimp Hanger Copied from the 2013 Southeastern New England Historical Calendar published by Spinner Publications, Inc. http://www.spinnerpub.com/Calendars_Home.html 646
  • CHARLES W. MORGAN “Ready to leave Round Hill” 1941 “On November 8, 1941, the last whale ship, the CHARLES W. MORGAN was donated to Mystic Seaport by Colonel Greens sister and heir. It was due to the lack of financial support from the short sighted city of New Bedford who had been offered the ship first. The ship had been enshrined at Colonel Greens Estate at Round Hill.” http://www.whalingcity.netCreator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.799 647
  • MIT & Colonel Green Round Hill Farm“Edward Howland Robinson Green, known as "Colonel" NedGreen, the only son of the renowned female tycoon and miser,Hetty Green, built his home on Round Hill after his mothersdeath in 1916 left him with a fortune of between $100 and $200million… In 1948, twelve years after the Colonels death, hissister and heir donated the entire property to MIT, which used the240-acre (0.97 km2) estate for educational and military purposes.MIT erected a giant antenna atop a 50,000-gallon water tank onthe site. Another was erected nearby for research towards theBallistic Missile early warning system.In 1923, Colonel Green founded WMAF, a radio station with thetag, "The Voice from Way Down East". MIT’s President SamuelW. Stratton and the Department of Electrical Engineerings newCommunications Division were invited to experiment with thenew technology, and the department was initially financed byColonel Green. Professor Edward L. Bowles set out to determinethe signal strength and radiation patterns of different antennaarrays in 1926. Round Hills radio station followed AdmiralRichard E. Byrd’s polar expeditions, tracked the Graf Zeppelindirigible during its maiden transatlantic flight, and was the solecommunication link for areas devastated by the Vermont floodsof 1927. In 1933, Round Hill was the site of Robert J. Van deGraaff’s electrical experiments. He built a 40-foot tall generatorin an abandoned airship hanger.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round_Hill_(Dartmouth,_Massachusetts) 648
  • NBWM 2#000.100.1588 Howland Homestead, 1930’sThe Round Hill Farm was just a poor working farm for most of the 250+ years it was under Howland ownership.Typical of Colonel Green’s extravagance, tractors like the above were used to mow the lawn on his private airport. 649
  • Creator: Fortier, Norman NBWM #2004.11.316 “Salters Regatta” “View of Beetle Cats racing off Salters Point. Round Hill lighthouse is in the middle left.” 650
  • Creator: Baylies, Clifford NBWM #2000.100.3742.19 “Two individuals on beach looking out at Round Hill.” 651
  • Photo by Aaron Sherman c. 2000 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Col_green_mansion.jpg “Colonel Greens Mansion, Round Hill, Dartmouth” 652
  • Photo: J. Grinnell Dartmouth Town Beach, August 2012 The wharf where the bark CHARLES W. MORGAN was birthed is on the right. 653
  • http://digital.lib.usf.edu/downloads/?doi=M01-09820-A&scale=1200&format=jpeg Col. Green’s Estate on Star Island in Biscayne Bay Today, stars like Gloria Estafan and Rosie O’Donnell own mansions on Star Island. Colonel Green was Hetty Green’s son and a great, great grandson of Gideon Howland (1734-1823), who was Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell’s father. The colonel and his sister Sylvia inherited 100% of Hetty Green’s fortune, which was originated by Isaac Howland, Jr. and Gideon Howland, Jr. (1770-1847). http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1126217/index.htm http://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/153092 654
  • Colonel Green’s Winter Home on Biscayne BayCOLONEL EDWARD HOWLAND ROBINSON GREEN AND THE WORLD HE CREATED AT ROUND HILL by Barbara Fortin, p. 143 655
  • “Col. E. H. R. Greens Yacht UNITED STATES” Creator: Dr. Henry Dudley Prescott Top: NBWM #981.80.48.32.a Bottom: NBWM #981.80.48.32.a “Col. E. H. R. Greens YachtAground in Padanaram Harbor” 656
  • Photographer: Dr. Henry D. Prescott NBWM #1981.80.61.7.a Shipwrecked Colonel Green’s monster yacht ran aground near the Round Hill homestead where Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell was born on Aug. 4, 1765. Much of the Howland fortune that the colonel had inherited sank along with his pathologically extravagant lifestyle. As previously mentioned, his fortune had originated by his great, great grandfather Isaac Howland, Jr. and great grandfather Gideon Howland, Jr., and it had been multiplied many times over by the Colonel’s grandfather “Black Hawk” Robinson and his mother, Hetty Green, the “Witch of Wall Street”. 657
  • Hetty H. R. Green Hall Wellesley College Gift of Col. Edward H. R. Green Creator: Fred W. Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.260a While Colonel Green paid for several women to attend college and financed MIT research at Round Hill, Hetty was famous for financial greed and her complete lack of philanthropy & empathy.Postcard: http://insight.wellesley.edu:8180/luna/servlet/detail/ 658
  • http://www.town.dartmouth.ma.us/Pages/DartmouthMA_Webdocs/picturesThe Dartmouth Purchase originally included New Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, & Westport. Tiverton and Little Compton, R.I. were included until 1746. Dartmouth Town Beach with CHARLES W. MORGAN Wharf Part of the original Howland Round Hill Farm 659
  • Photographer: Dr. Henry Prescott NBWM #1981.80.143.4.a “BALEK in front of Dumpling Rock Light with Col. E. H. R. Greens Mansion in background, 1932.” 660
  • Photo: J. Grinnell Captain John Grinnell House, c. 1861 525 Old County Road, WestportCapt. John Grinnell was captain of the brig THOMAS WINSLOW for two whaling voyages from 1864 to 1867 (March 15, 1864 to July23, 1865 & Oct 25, 1865 to Aril 23, 1867). The THOMAS WINSLOW was built in Westport in 1828. It weighed 135 tons and was 73ft. in length. The house is about a tenth of a mile from the shipyards at the Head of Westport. Capt. John does not appear to havebeen directly related to Capt. Cornelius. Due to his wealth and status and The Howland Heirs, much more is known about Capt.Cornelius Grinnell. Contrary to popular belief, there is no record of Cornelius Grinnell being a captain of any whaling ship orbeing employed in any capacity on a whaling ship or going out to the Pacific. All evidence indicates that his days at sea were spentexclusively in the North Atlantic merchant fleet. According to Whaling Masters and Whaling Voyages Sailing From AmericanPorts by Judith Navas Lund, the Howlands were captains on 149 whaling voyages and the Grinnells captained 37 voyages. 661
  • Spinner Publications: MI-D 0082 WestportWestport was part of the Dartmouth Purchase 662
  • Bible given by Capt. Preserved Fish to Eliza T. Grinnell (Mrs. Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.) Captain Preserved Fish was a partner of Captain Cornelius Grinnell in several ships, and he was a founding partner of Fish & Grinnell. It is believed that Preserved’s brother, Isaac, married Ruth Grinnell, sister of Capt. Cornelius (slide 413). 663
  • Bible: given by Capt. Preserved Fish to Eliza T. Grinnell (Mrs. Cornelius Grinnell, Jr.)NBM Archives Births and deaths of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza Birth of abolition advocate Cornelia Grinnell Births of Lawrence, Mary, Joseph G., Edmund, & William 664
  • Dr. Bailey Willis 1857-1949 NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Stanford University Professor Son of Cornelia Grinnell Grandson of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza BAILEY WILLIS 1857—1949 A Biographical Memoir by ELIOT BLACKWELDERAny opinions expressed in this memoir are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Academy of Sciences. The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 254 (slide 485) Biographical Memoir COPYRIGHT 1961 NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES WASHINGTON D.C. books.nap.edu/html/biomems/bwillis.pdf http://histsoc.stanford.edu/pdfmem/WillisB.pdf 665
  • Lawrence I. Grinnell, Ph.D. 1889-1985 Cornell University Professor Grandson of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza Great Grandson of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 267http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/ead/htmldocs/RMM02649.html 666
  • Arthur Gordon Grinnell 1854-1924 Son of Joseph G. & LydiaGrandson of Cornelius, Jr. & Eliza The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, 1919, p. 266 Artists of New Bedford: Mary Jean Blasdale, 1990 667
  • Historic DestructionUnknown Date & Photographer NBWM Research Library Photo: Fred Palmer NBWM #2000.100.80.158 Cornelius & Sylvia’s Home, c. 1870 Grinnell Home, c. 1906 (DEMOLISHED) Above: these two photographs illustrate that the area near New Bedford’s waterfront rapidly became commercialized in the latter half of the 1800’s. Right: Cornelius Grinnell bought this house from Preserved Fish in 1791. In the 1790’s, these brothers-in-law were employed as captains by William Rotch, Jr. (slide 10, etc.). They went on to own several ships together and found the business that became Grinnell, Minturn & Co. Right: Photographs of Houses and Public Buildings, Henry Worth & Fred Palmer, 1907 See Fred Palmer’s photos at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nbwm 668
  • Grinnell Brothers 1911 Retrospective The clippings on the left are from a lengthy 1911 article about Capt. Cornelius and his four most successful sons. Sadly, the writer did not mention any of Cornelius, Jr.’s successes in business and politics or the famous ships that he owned and managed. Furthermore, the two paragraphs about Cornelius, Jr. are almost entirely about other people and events.(Note: there are some serious inaccuracies in this article.) (Partial Article) 669
  • http://spinnerpub.com/Spinner_Photos.html Spinner Publications (ST 00512) Home of Cornelius Grinnell, Jr., c. 1939 385 County St. Built for Cornelius and Mary Grinnell, Jr. c. 1829. On Nov. 17, 1784, Cornelius, Jr. married Eliza Tallman Russell, daughter of Gilbert and Lydia Russell. Cornelius, Jr. and Eliza had ten children, the youngest being Cornelia who was born on March 19, 1825. Eliza died on Jan. 19, 1827. On Oct. 9, 1828, Cornelius, Jr. married Mary Russell, a sister of Eliza. On Dec. 11, 1830, Cornelius, Jr. died. Thus, young Cornelia had a very tragic early childhood with both her parents dying before her sixth birthday. In 1838, Cornelia’s step mother/aunt died; and she was adopted by “Uncle Joe”. Today, there are many wonderful restored homes in this historic neighborhood. 670
  • Guide to New Bedford, by B. Clayton & K. Whitley Above: “Little is known of Cornelius Grinnell Jr…” Despite his many accomplishments, Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. became a forgotten man. He does not have a headstone in Oak Grove Cemetery, and the above description is almost entirely about his father!Photo: J. Grinnell Cornelius, Jr.’s Home in 2011 (Ahavath Achim Synagogue) Cornelius & Sylvia’s granddaughter, Cornelia Grinnell, lived here 1829-1838. This building was built for Cornelius, Jr., who was Peter S. Grinnell’s great, great grandfather. It is hoped that this property will be saved and restored to “green building” standards, and become part of the adjacent non-profit congregate home in the Joseph Grinnell Mansion. To honor her contribution to the Abolitionist Movement by purchasing the freedom of Harriet Jacobs, the building should be restored and named: “The Cornelia Grinnell Home”. (DEMOLITION Possible) 671
  • Joseph Grinnell Congregate Home Future Cornelia Grinnell Home? Saved by WHALE 385 County StreetPhoto: J. Grinnell Grinnell Family Together On the far right is Cornelius, Jr. & Mary’s former home with the white porch columns almost hidden by shrubs. Sadly, Cornelius, Jr. died before Joseph built his mansion. It is believed that Joseph built here so he could be a father to his older brother’s nine orphaned children. Joseph was their guardian along with William W. Swain, and the Grinnells owned Cornelius, Jr.’s house until the Hathaways bought it in 1844. For this entire historic property to return to its former splendor, the parking lot and 1962 school building in the middle should be removed and replaced with lawn and a gazebo for the residents. Restoring this very visible corner would provide jobs and increase the historical interest and tourist business in New Bedford. See 1881 map (slide 471) for location of the corner of County & Hawthorn Streets. 672
  • Linden Place Russell Warren Bristol, RI http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Warren_(architect)Designed by Russell Warren, who lived in Bristol and designed the Joseph Grinnell Russell Warren (1783 – 1860) was an American architect,Mansion, John Avery Parker Mansion, and Double Bank Building in New Bedford. best known for his Greek revival style, and notably the design http://www.lindenplace.org/ of the Weybosset Arcade, now known as the Westminister Arcade in Providence, RI. Warren was born in Tiverton, RI. By the early nineteenth century, operated out of Bristol, RI where he constructed several houses for the DeWolfs, a prominent family of slave traders. Warren built numerous buildings throughout RI and MA. He also built several notable buildings in S. Carolina… Notable works: Linden Place Linden Place, Bristol, Rhode Island, 1810 Bristol Statehouse/Courthouse, Bristol, RI, 1814 [2] Westminster Arcade, Providence, Rhode Island, 1828 (first enclosed shopping mall) St. Marks Episcopal Church, Warren, Rhode Island, 1830 [3] Grinnell Mansion, New Bedford, Massachusetts, 1832 [4] Pilgrim Hall portico, Plymouth, MA, 1834 [5] Levi H. Gale House, Newport, Rhode Island, 1835 New Bedford Public Library, New Bedford, Massachusetts, 1839 [6] Smithville Seminary, Scituate, Rhode Island, 1839 State Arsenal, Providence, Rhode Island, 1839 Pearl Street Depot, New Bedford, 1840 (demolished in 1880s) Osborn House, Fall River, Massachusetts, 1843 James D. Hathaway House, Fall River, MA, 1843 William Lindsey House, Fall River, MA, 1844 Warren Baptist Church, Warren, Rhode Island, 1844 [3] Longfield/Charles Dana Gibson House, Bristol, The Wissing House Bristol, Rhode Island, 1849 [7] Old Third District Courthouse, New Bedford, MA, 1853 (& Traces of the Trade other buildings in the New Bedford Historic District) http://www.tracesofthetrade.org/ Governor Henry Lippitt House, Providence, RI, Jane Pickens Theater & Event Center Documentary on the owners of Linden Place and the Slave Trade: (formerly The Zion Episcopal Church), 1834. “Courage to Bear Witness to Man’s Infinite Cruelties” in The New York Times, June 13, 2008. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/13/movies/13righ.html?_r=1 http://www.tracesofthetrade.org/ 673
  • Howland Homestead: Moved to Newport in 1969 Birth Home of Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell In 1969, the Benjamin Howland House of Round Hill was moved to Newport, RI. Sylvia (Howland) Grinnell was born in this house on Aug. 4, 1765, and it was the site of numerous Howland Family Reunions. It was built by Benjamin Howland, and four generations of Sylvia’s ancestors lived in the house. It is hoped that my proposed “Cornelia Grinnell Home” will have a similar fate and be restored along with the property surrounding it.http://www.newportrestoration.org/preservation/historic_houses/details/33-benjamin_howland 674
  • “Over the past 48 years, WHALE has facilitated the completion of more than 40 restoration and preservation projects in the New Bedford area.” * Saved by WHALE*http://www.waterfrontleague.org/http://spinnerpub.com/Spinner_Photos.html Before After Not Just Anywhere, Marsha McCabe & Joseph Thomas, Spinner Publications, 1995. 675
  • Photo: J. Grinnell Home of Peter & Mary Lou Grinnell 44 William Street, Fairhaven Peter was the last Grinnell to grow up in the Joseph Grinnell Mansion, according to historian Peggi Medeiros. 676
  • Creator: Church, Albert Cook NBWM #2000.100.86.1034 “Miss Emily Grinnell” Sister of Peter Severance Grinnell and daughter of Lawrence & Emily Grinnell, Jr. Emily gave the portraits of Gilbert & Lydia Russell to the NBWM (#1993.46.1 & #1993.46.2 at slide 586) 677
  • Peter Severance Grinnell A Founder of WHALE Standard-Times, Dec. 25, 1995Standard-Times, Jan. 5, 1981 Standard-Times Peter & Mary Lou gave the GRINNELL RESOLUTE DESK As noted in The Howland Heirs (#391 III, slide 540), Peter was the son of Lawrence & Emily Grinnell, Jr. and a direct descendant of Cornelius & Eliza Grinnell, Jr. In addition to the desk, Peter & Mary Lou gave many family treasures to the Whaling Museum including three William A. Wall paintings and the portraits of Henry, Moses, and Susan; the Lawrence Grinnell sign; miniatures of William Rotch, Jr. and Samuel Rodman, Sr.; Sylvia Grinnell’s patriotic embroidery; and many other heirlooms. 678
  • Chapter VIII. Pacific Northwest Descendants & Addenda Charles Herbert Grinnell Emma Adelia Briggs 1862-1915 (unrecorded dates) Capt. Cornelius Grinnell’s bible was handed down to Charles H. Grinnell. 679
  • Wedding CertificateCharles H. Grinnell & Emma A. Briggs March 18, 1885, Wasioja, Minnesota The Howland Heirs: Wm M. Emery, p. 250 & 261 680
  • Dakota Territory Land Grant, 1890Charles H. Grinnell was a great grandson of Cornelius and Sylvia (previous slide). 681
  • Lawrence Grinnell to Charles H. Grinnell, 1891Both men were descendants of Cornelius & Sylvia. Lawrence was their grandson, and he lived in NewBedford. This Charles was their great grandson, and he moved to Tacoma, Washington in 1891. Charles wasborn in Mantorville, Minnesota on Oct. 23, 1862 and died in Tacoma on Dec. 31, 1915. At the time it waswritten in 1891, this letter indicates that Charles Herbert Grinnell had never been to New Bedford.Charles H. was a grandson of James Madison Grinnell, the youngest son of Cornelius & Sylvia (slide 419).James Madison Grinnell was a partner in Kollock & Grinnell of New Bedford. He owned shares in severalships including the CICERO, which was built for Kollock & Grinnell. James M. moved to Connecticut in themid 1830’s after the death of his oldest brother, Cornelius, Jr. His descendants inherited the 1785 family bible. 682
  • 1891 Letter regarding the Clark’s Cove Lot: May 9, 1891This lot had been purchased by Cornelius Grinnell and Cornelius Howland in 1803, and it was the subject of a Dec. 2, 1803 advertisementin The Columbia Courier (slide 441). These two men, with the same unusual first name, were captured by the British together (c. 1778)and became brother’s-in-law and business partners. As previously related & proven, Cornelius Grinnell and his sons were partners with anumber of Howland relatives in numerous ships and several businesses. This historic letter was almost destroyed in 2008. 683
  • Lawrence Grinnell to Charles Grinnell Charles H. Grinnell (Sr.) May 9, 1891, final page President, Tacoma Grocery Co. 684
  • W. Emery: The Howland Heirs, #386, pg. 261 History of Tacoma & Charles H. Grinnell (Sr.) 685
  • Charles H. Grinnell (Sr.) was a great grandson of Capt. Cornelius & Sylvia. 686
  • Grinnell Memorial Organ Tacoma, Wash.Emma Grinnell donated an organ to the First BaptistChurch of Tacoma, where Charles had been a trustee.This was remarkably similar to what FrederickGrinnell’s family did after he died. Frederick Grinnell Memorial Organ New Bedford The First Congregational Society was the name of the New Bedford Unitarian Church in 1907. 687
  • Charles & Esther: 1919 Jim, Tish, & Chuck: 1943Charles H. Grinnell (II) became another successfulGrinnell capitalists. After moving to Vancouver followingWW I, he went into the lumber & shipping business. 688
  • Charles H. Grinnell (Jr.) Charles H. Grinnell (Jr.) was a great, great grandson of Capt. Cornelius and Sylvia. The 1785 family bible was passed down from C. H. to J. B. Grinnell. 689
  • DEIRDRE cruising in British Columbia Charles H. Grinnell: captain/owner 690
  • Aboard the DEIRDRE, flying the Union JackDEIRDRE was a Canadian boat, and Charles H. Grinnell (II) became a naturalized Canadian in 1935 and was a member of the RoyalVancouver Yacht Club. From left to right: Grandpa Jim, Uncle Chuck, Grandma Tish, and Great Grandma Esther. Tish was born inVancouver on April 14, 1922 and graduated from Mills College. She moved to Cohasset, MA in 1957 and died there on Aug. 1,2008. James B. was born in Tacoma on Nov. 9, 1920 and graduated from Andover Academy and the University of BritishColumbia. He became a Canadian with his father and served in the Canadian Navy during World War II. He was in the wholesalelumber business in New York, Vancouver, and Boston. He moved to Cohasset 54 years ago and is still living there at the age of 92. 691
  • DEIRDRE: owned by Charles H. Grinnell (Jr.), Cornelius & Sylvia’s great, great grandson. 692
  • DEIRDRE II cruising in British Columbia 693
  • Mildred Patricia (Tish) Grinnell Mills College 1946 694
  • James B. Grinnell, Scotland, WWII Tish, Madge, & Grace Thomson, 1935C.H. Grinnell residence, 1930’s, Vancouver, B.C. James & Tish Grinnell, France, 1952 695
  • Spring 1943 October 2, 1942 Jim & Tish Grinnell 696
  • Charles Herbert Grinnell (Jr.) James Briggs Grinnell 1896-1968 1920- 697
  • Wascana: c. 1940Home of Dr. & Mrs. J. W. Thomson Parents of Tish Grinnell Vancouver, B. C. 698
  • Dr. James W. and Grace Thomson, 1955Parents of Tish Grinnell. James W. (1883-1958) was “a graduate inMedicine from McGill University [and] was the first member of the familyto move to Vancouver in 1907 where he…specialized in surgery.” 699
  • Esther & Charles H. Grinnell (II) Charles M. GrinnellEsther in bow of canoe. Esther’s grandfather, James D. Snoddy graduated from Born in Cohasset in 1957. As can be imagined from histhe Univ. of Michigan in 1859. “He was commissioned colonel of the Sixth confident bearing, Charles has grown up to be the latest in theregiment Kansas militia June 13, 1864.” He also served in the Kansas House of line of successful businessmen named “Charles Grinnell”.Representatives. Esther’s father, James, was an attorney in Portland, Oregon. Today, he is the founding president of a robotics company. 700
  • Genealogy Chart of Cohasset Grinnell FamilyLeft: yellow line is path of the 1785 family bible. 701
  • Dedication of Grinnell Children First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Duxbury, May 1982 At home after Dedication, 305 Mayflower St., DuxburyThese children were born in Boston and were brought home to thishouse. Duxbury is the town that Henry Howland settled in afterhe arrived from England c. 1623. He did not purchase land inDartmouth until 1652 (Howland Heirs, Wm. Emery, pgs. 2 & 3).Like their ancient relatives in New Bedford, two of these Grinnellchildren became very active in the Unitarian Church; and theywere youth representatives to the national General Assembly. 702
  • Grinnell Family Home, Duxbury305 Mayflower St. Designed and built primarily by James Grinnell, Jr. 703
  • Tish loved flowers and almost all living things. She was ahorticultural judge and president of the Cohasset Garden Clubfor many years. This is one of her numerous blue ribbons. 704
  • Grandma Tish with 11 of her 13 grandchildren These “children” are all great, great, great,great, great grandchildren of Cornelius & Sylvia. “New” Grinnell home, 38 Cedar Street, Duxbury 705
  • Celebrations & MemorialsThe above photo was taken at Grandma Tish’s 80th birthdayparty. Eleven of her thirteen grandchildren were present, andMartha is standing next to her mother in the middle of thepicture. Martha was a great, great, great, great granddaughterof Cornelius & Sylvia and some of her ashes were buriedbetween their graves in Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford. 706
  • Grinnell/Howland Ships Built in Mattapoisett Stuart-Barstow HouseGrinnell Home 2005-2010 NBWM Volunteer Newsletter The Ports of Old Rochester, by Edward F. R. Wood, Jr. 707
  • Mattapoisett Historical Society Grinnell Home, Mattapoisett: 2005-2010Stuart-Barstow House, 35 Water St., Mattapoisett, original structure built 1753. Mattapoisett was a part of the Town ofRochester until 1857. According to Edward Wood, Jr. in The Ports of Old Rochester, 348 vessels were built in Mattapoisett from1703-1878. Most of them were square-rigged whaling and merchant ships and a few were owned by Grinnells & Howlands.Many of these ships were built by the Barstow family, who owned three shipyards along the shore in front of this house. 708
  • WANDERER Mast at Shipyard Park“More than 350 vessels went down the ways during this period(1752-1878). Among the most famous were:ACUSHNET. Ship, 1840, which carried as crew member HermanMelville… Ten years later he wrote the famous whaling saga Moby Dick.WANDERER. Bark, 1878, last whaleship to be built in MattapoisettYards; and one of the last whalers to leave New Bedford.” Shipbuilders PlaqueRight: replica of the WANDERER mast on top of the town flagpole. Photo by J. Grinnell: 10.27.12 The Calm before Hurricane Sandy 709
  • Creator: Raleigh, Charles Sidney NBWM #1918.27.2.12 “Maiden Voyage, Bark WANDERER” built at Mattapoisett 710
  • Creator: Raleigh, Charles Sidney NBWM #1992.56 Brig FRANCES A. BARSTOW built at Mattapoisett Gift of Francis C. Howland 711
  • ADDENDA Additional New Bedford Vessels Owned by Grinnells & HowlandsAdapted From: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. 712
  • Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. http://www.simplexgrinnell.com/ENUS/AboutUs/Pages/SimplexGrinnellHistory.aspx 713
  • Adapted From: Ship Registers of New Bedford Above: Researched & Compiled by James GrinnellData from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland by Franklyn Howland, 1885 714
  • Above from: The Howland Heirs, Wm. Emery, 1919, pg. 351 Left: Ship Registers of New Bedford list of ships owned by Gideon & Gideon, Jr. As explained to the far left, all these ships must have been owned by the son, Gideon Howland (Jr.) born in 1770. Gideon Jr. was captain of the Ship TIMOLEON in 1812 (#3025) and was captain of other vessels, whose records have not survived.Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. 715
  • Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. 716
  • Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. 717
  • Data from: Ship Registers of New Bedford Researched & Compiled by James Grinnell, Jr. 718
  • Memoir of Joseph GrinnellWilliam T. Russell (1788-1872) married Joseph’s sister Sylvia. They lived at 66 Russell St. (slide 606), half a block from Josephand Cornelius, Jr. on County St. and across the street from William’s father, Gilbert Russell at 61 So. Sixth St. William was thebrother of Eliza and Susan Russell, who married Cornelius, Jr. William, Eliza, and Susan were children of Gilbert Russell, theson of Joseph Russell who was one of the original settlers of New Bedford. It is believed that William T. started his career at Post& Russell in New York, where Cornelius Grinnell, Jr. became a partner in 1809 (when the name was changed to Post & Grinnell).William owned shares in 18 New Bedford ships; and he owned an oil works with his father and his brother-in-law, JosephAnthony. He was instrumental in the founding of Wamsutta Mills with Joseph Grinnell. Capt. Cornelius is said to have giveneach of his sons $500 to get started in business when they were 21. The dowry he gave to William T. Russell is not known. 719
  • Memoir of Joseph Grinnell 720
  • Memoir of Joseph Grinnell 721
  • Memoir of Joseph Grinnell 722
  • Memoir of Joseph Grinnell 723
  • Memoir of Joseph Grinnell William J. Rotch Gothic CottageAs can be seen above, William J. Rotch was a guest at this dinnerhonoring Joseph Grinnell. He was a grandson of William Rotch, Jr. whohad employed Capt. Cornelius as master of his ship BEDFORD in the1790’s (slide 10). In addition to being a mayor of New Bedford (1852)and founding president of the New Bedford Cordage Co., William J.Rotch was a director of several other companies including the WamsuttaMills. He lived about two blocks from Joseph Grinnell (map: slide 471)in his “Gothic Cottage” (right). William J.’s son Morgan was also mayorof New Bedford (1885-1888), and he married Josephine Grinnell. The Rotches by John M. Bullard 724
  • New Bedford Free Public Library Square-Riggers on Schedule, Robert G. Albion, Princeton Univ. Press, 1938 The FLYING CLOUD: launched April 15, 1851 Several sources state that Henry Grinnell retired from Grinnell, Minturn & Co. in 1851. As can be seen above, he was a partner in June 1851, which indicates that he was an owner of the FLYING CLOUD when it was launched.