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Water Mites Of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
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Water Mites Of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

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16 color slides of aquatic mites from Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Includes points about why aquatic mites are important and a link to more information including maps, life history, and …

16 color slides of aquatic mites from Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Includes points about why aquatic mites are important and a link to more information including maps, life history, and research activities.

Published in: Art & Photos, Travel

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  • As part of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park All-Taxa Biological Inventory, scientists from the University of Arkansas have collected water mite genera from 24 watersheds in the park in aquatic habitat representative of ’stream riffles and pools, springs and seepages, and waterfalls’ (Radwell & Smith, 2007). These collections yielded ’56 genera in 25 families and 7 superfamilies’ (Radwell & Smith, 2007). Smoky Mountains National Park .

    http://www.wildlifeworld360.com/great-smoky-mountains-national-park.html
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  • 1. AQUATIC MITES OF GREAT SMOKYAQUATIC MITES OF GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARKMOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK Southern Appalachian Information Node National Biological Information Infrastructure http://sain.nbii.gov/
  • 2. East Fork of Flat Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hygrobatoidea Family Aturidae       Aturus sp. (male)
  • 3. Middle Prong of the Little River Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hydryphantoidea Family Hydryphantidae
  • 4. Big Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hydryphantoidea Family Rhynchohydracaridae Clathosperchon sp.
  • 5. Forney Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Eylaoidea Family Limnocharidae Rhyncholimnochares sp.
  • 6. Bradley Fork Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Sperchonidae Sperchon sp.
  • 7. East Fork of Flat Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Sperchonidae Sperchon sp.
  • 8. Middle Prong of the Little River Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Sperchonidae Sperchon sp.
  • 9. Tributary West Prong of the Little River Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Sperchonidae Sperchonopsis sp.
  • 10. East Fork of Flat Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Sperchonidae Sperchonopsis sp.
  • 11. Hazel Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Torrenticolidae Torrenticola sp.
  • 12. East Fork of Flat Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Lebertioidea Family Torrenticolidae Testudacarus sp.
  • 13. Roaring Fork Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hygrobatoidea Family Feltriidaedae       Feltria sp.
  • 14. East Fork of Flat Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hygrobatoidea Family Aturidae       Aturus sp. (male)
  • 15. Walker Camp Prong of the Little Pigeon River Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hygrobatoidea Family Aturidae Brachypoda sp.
  • 16. Middle Prong of the Little River Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Hygrobatoidea Family Aturidae Ljania sp.
  • 17. Bradley Fork Great Smoky Mountains National Park [Photo: Dr. Andrea Radwell, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville] Superfamily Arrenuroidea Family Momoniidae Stygomomonia sp.
  • 18. Why are Aquatic Mites Important? •Water mites are excellent indicators of environmental quality • Aquatic mite diversity declines sharply in chemically polluted or physically disturbed aquatic ecosystems
  • 19. Why are Aquatic Mites Important? •Water mites are excellent indicators of environmental quality • Aquatic mite diversity declines sharply in chemically polluted or physically disturbed aquatic ecosystems •In the ecosystem, aquatic mites perform a regulatory function as consumers • Larval water mites parasitize diverse aquatic insects • Pre-adult and mature water mites prey on insect and fish eggs, other aquatic invertebrates, dead organisms, or parasitize bivalves.
  • 20. Why are Aquatic Mites Important? •Water mites are excellent indicators of environmental quality • Aquatic mite diversity declines sharply in chemically polluted or physically disturbed aquatic ecosystems •In the ecosystem, aquatic mites perform a regulatory function as consumers • Larval water mites parasitize diverse aquatic insects • Pre-adult and mature water mites prey on insect and fish eggs, other aquatic invertebrates, dead organisms, or parasitize bivalves. •Aquatic mites are food for a wide variety of aquatic organisms • Freshwater cnidarians, insects, and other invertebrates use aquatic mites as a food sources. • Aquatic mites are sometimes a significant part of fish and turtle diets.
  • 21. Why are Aquatic Mites Important? •Water mites are excellent indicators of environmental quality • Aquatic mite diversity declines sharply in chemically polluted or physically disturbed aquatic ecosystems •In the ecosystem, aquatic mites perform a regulatory function as consumers • Larval water mites parasitize diverse aquatic insects • Pre-adult and mature water mites prey on insect and fish eggs, other aquatic invertebrates, dead organisms, or parasitize bivalves. •Aquatic mites are food for a wide variety of aquatic organisms • Freshwater cnidarians, insects, and other invertebrates use aquatic mites as a food sources. • Aquatic mites are sometimes a significant part of fish and turtle diets. Want to learn more about Aquatic Mites in Great Smoky Mountains National Park? For maps, host species, distribution, and more, visit: http://sain.nbii.gov/species