Meeting the e-resources challenge through collaboration: an OCLC perspective on effective management, access and delivery of electronic collections
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Meeting the e-resources challenge through collaboration: an OCLC perspective on effective management, access and delivery of electronic collections

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Libraries have been evolving their methods and approaches to managing the increasing range and number of electronic collections; however, much of the technology that has been developed to support this ...

Libraries have been evolving their methods and approaches to managing the increasing range and number of electronic collections; however, much of the technology that has been developed to support this evolution involves the use of closed, disparate systems that each supports a single aspect of electronic resource management. At this session, OCLC staff and experts from member libraries will look at specific challenges of the e-resource management life cycle and share their perspectives about the opportunities to simplify and streamline processes at each step of the workflowselect, acquire, describe, discover, access and renew.

Particular focus will be given to the potential for libraries (and providers) to share data, tools and processes within OCLC's suite of WorldShare applications. These include: working with publishers to provide comprehensive, timely, good quality, reusable metadata to drive the discovery and usage of electronic resources; providing APIs that foster the development of functional enhancements that benefit everyone; working with a range of partners to embed metadata about, and drive discovery of, library collections in the sites and tools where users start their search.

OCLC is a worldwide cooperative of more than 16,000 libraries, archives and museums, working with members to provide a range of cloud-based, cooperative services that manage the complete library management life cycleOCLC WorldShare. OCLC's unique community-led approach to cataloging has resulted in widespread acknowledgment of the richness and accuracy of libraries' metadata. We are now applying this approach to the description, management and discovery of electronic resources.

By offering applications that address acquisitions, link resolution, authentication, license management, discovery, metadata synchronization and analyticson an open, shared platformOCLC is working with libraries to share the work of managing and delivering licensed resources with services that streamline and automate critical functions at every step of the library's workflow.

Presenters:

Maria Collins
Head, Acquisitions and Discovery, North Carolina State University

Rene Erlandson
Director of Virtual Services, University of Nebraska Omaha

Jill Fluvog
Director of eSolutions, OCLC

Dawn Hale
Head of Technical Services, Johns Hopkins University

Andrew Pace
Executive Director for Networked Library Services, OCLC

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    Meeting the e-resources challenge through collaboration: an OCLC perspective on effective management, access and delivery of electronic collections Meeting the e-resources challenge through collaboration: an OCLC perspective on effective management, access and delivery of electronic collections Presentation Transcript

    • NASIG Conference May 2, 2014 MeetingtheE-ResourcesChallenge throughCollaboration AnOCLCperspective oneffective management,accessanddelivery of electroniccollections Maria Collins, North Carolina State University Dawn Hale, Johns Hopkins University Rene Erlandson, University of Nebraska Omaha Andrew K. Pace, OCLC Jill Fluvog, OCLC
    • The challenge of “e”
    • The world’s libraries. Connected. By 2020, it’s predicted that 80% of academic library expenditures will be on e-resources. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
    • The world’s libraries. Connected. Yet, alarmingly… 94% of librarians still rely on spreadsheets for electronic resource management. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
    • Maria Collins Are we there yet? Challenges of ERM (a journey) Dawn Hale Managing E-Resources: Lifecycle Challenges & Potential Andrew Pace Purpose-driven Electronic Resource Management Rene Erlandson WMS Reality Check Agenda The problem, the promise, the role of collaboration
    • • Research and reports • Short-term advisory groups for service introductions • Generally 1:1 Publisher Relations team • Content Provider eQuality group • Electronic Resources Advisory Council (3 years) Collaboration and the Cooperative “How can OCLC help?”
    • The world’s libraries. Connected. Meeting the E-Resources Challenge An OCLC Report Download a copy of the report at: oc.lc/e-resources
    • Provide services that are: • Shaped • Informed • “built” • and improved by the efforts of global community. Cooperation + collaboration = Acceleration! Collaboration and the Cooperative “How can OCLC help?”
    • Are we there yet? Challenges of ERM (a journey) Maria Collins Head of Acquisitions & Discovery North Carolina State University
    • ERM: A long and winding path
    • Challenge: Mainstreaming ERM • ERM as core • Why this is a good idea? • The costs of exceptional workflows • Potential roadblocks
    • Challenge: Creating workflow-centric design • What are workflow-centered processes? • How do we get there? • Why is this approach useful? • Potential barriers
    • Challenge: Achieving Scale • Understanding how siloed systems and processes don’t scale • Problems and examples • Shift to global • Supporting community-driven efforts (GOKb, OCLC’s WorldCat KB)
    • Challenge: Doing more with less • Why automation has to happen? • Why is this difficult? • Don’t look back! • Benefits and changes
    • Challenge: Supporting Local • Managing increased expectations while streamlining processes • Balancing tensions and resources • Seeking flexible systems that can provide local support
    • Challenge: Living with Siloed ERMS • Growing what is ready; making do with the rest • Contributing to the conversation • The costs of ERM without integrated solutions
    • Challenge: Industry Readiness Importance of collaborative conversations and collective action.
    • Strategies for getting down the road • New directions to help with the journey • Global community investment • Iterative design; workflow focus • Support for automation • Support for collaboration
    • ARE WE THERE YET? ALMOST….
    • NASIG May 2, 2014 Dawn Hale Head of Technical Services Johns Hopkins University Managing E-Resources: Lifecycle Challenges & Potentials
    • 10 years later A walk in the park The challenges
    • Evolution in tools for managing e-resources • Spreadsheets, locally-developed systems, ILS • Standalone disparate systems - Link resolver, ERM, proxy, ILS, discovery tool(s), use statistics • Webscale systems
    • Streamlining opportunities • Selection & evaluation of content • Backend management & integration with book jobber, subscription agent • Discovery
    • E-management challenges • Retaining perpetual access rights when resources move from vendor to vendor • Local workflow management & internal communication • Problem tracking separate
    • Increased publishing output • Self publishing • Content aggregation • Consortial purchasing • Shared collections
    • Business models exploit potential of network technology • Demand Driven Acquisitions (variety of models) • Models incorporating use, value, market
    • Managing the transition to open access • Subsidize author APC charges • Negotiate/manage hybrid open access agreements • Enhance open access metadata to facilitate discovery
    • Discovery challenges •Content harvested in mega-index •Non-inclusion of publisher metadata in indexes •Uneven quality & timely distribution of vendor metadata •Proprietary formats & protocols for data exchange • Default ranking and returning of search results
    • Collective challenges • Budgets constraints • Increased scale/number of e- resources • User expectations: “instant” access
    • • Collective problems require collective action in developing solutions STANDARDS/ BEST PRACTICES Link resolvers Open URL, IOTA KB metadata exchange KBART Use Counter, SUSHI Cost: CORE License terms Onix PL, SERU Works DOI, ISSN, ISBN, ISTC Carriers: Presentation: PIEJ Transfer of Code Practice MARC, XML-ONIX Data Exchange Institutions Identifiers WorldCat Registry Shibboleth ISNI Discovery Open Discovery Initiative
    • Ongoing success Ability to transition from institution-centric to user-centric networked world based on dynamic exchange of data between publishers, vendors, libraries to connect our users with electronic content.
    • The world’s libraries. Connected. THE E-RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKFLOW Andrew K. Pace Executive Director Networked Library Services, OCLC
    • Electronic Resource Management: A Brief History My first ERM Pros: • Sturdy • Fire-proof Cons: • No network capability • Not very scalable
    • Electronic Resource Management: A Brief History My second ERM Pros: • Intelligent query interpretation logic and reasoning (uses fuzzy logic technology) • Capable of learning/adapting to new scenarios Cons: • 10s of thousands of dollars per year to maintain • Shuts down completely in sleep mode for 7-8 hours per night
    • Electronic Resource Management: A Brief History My third ERM Pros: • Built for purpose • Manages massive complexity Cons: • Built for purpose • Manages massive complexity
    • Electronic Resource Management: A Brief History My last ERM Pros: • Sturdy • Fire-proof Cons: • No network capability • Not very scalable Pros: • Intelligent query interpretation logic and reasoning (uses fuzzy logic technology) • Capable of learning/adapting to new scenarios Cons: • 10s of thousands of dollars per year to maintain • Shuts down completely in sleep mode for 7-8 hours per night Pros: • Built for purpose • Manages massive complexity Cons: • Built for purpose • Manages massive complexity • Built for utility • One knowledge base: SELECT, ACQUIRE, DESCRIBE, DISCOVER, ACCESS, RENEW • Offers Discovery and Access components by default • Fits library workflows • Purpose Driven Pros: • End-to-end e-resource/Serial management (management, discovery, and delivery) • Leverages aggregated data—bibliographic, vendor, access, license • Completely cloud-based (like the content it manages) Cons: • None found yet
    • Ask yourself • Is my solution: – Technology driven? – Standards driven? – Current workflow driven? – Library problem driven?
    • Then remember…. “Just because yours is better than everyone else’s doesn’t mean it’s any good.”
    • Intelligent workflows Connected toaglobal datanetwork Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • eWorkflows, eManagement, eDiscovery, eAccess, eSharing • Knowledge base management • Link resolver, Citation Finder (journals, databases, ebooks) • A-Z lists (journals, databases, ebooks) • eArticle Delivery • eBook Demand Driven Acquisitions • Local system record delivery and upkeep • Syndication of eHoldings to 3rd party providers • eResource Management: subscriptions, licenses, rights, vendors • Workflow: trials and negotiations • Identity Management • Access: local and remote access administration • eAnalytics / Usage EVERY library is using 0-12 applications to do all of the following Intelligent workflows
    • eWorkflows, eManagement, eDiscovery, eAccess, eSharing • Knowledge base management • Link resolver, Citation Finder (journals, databases, ebooks) • A-Z lists (journals, databases, ebooks) • eArticle Delivery • eBook Demand Driven Acquisitions • Local system record delivery and upkeep • Syndication of eHoldings to 3rd party providers • eResource Management: subscriptions, licenses, rights, vendors • Workflow: trials and negotiations • Identity Management • Access: local and remote access administration • eAnalytics / Usage Intelligent workflows SELECTION, ACQUISITION, DESCRIPTION, DISCOVERY, ACCESS, RENEWAL Together again, for the first time.
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • Intelligent workflows
    • WorldCat Global Data Network Bibliographic (E/P/D) Holdings (E/P/D) Article citation and full-text Central Index Vendor Data Authorities E-Collections E-Licenses Works Acquisitions Circulation ILL EZproxy License Manager Collection Manager Record Manager Analytics Cloud-based Applications Connected toaglobal datanetwork
    • Content Partners Connected toaglobal datanetwork
    • Consumer Services Connected toaglobal datanetwork
    • Connected toaglobal datanetwork
    • There are nearly 1,300 libraries using the WorldCat knowledge base in some way. Over 360 million holdings for e-books and e- journals managed in the KB. Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • knowledge base 5,600 + providers 1. Member libraries approve/deny changes before they are made. Phase 1 Knowledge Base Cooperative Data Management Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • See changes to global KB collections before they are applied Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • knowledge base 5,600 + providers 2. Members can make changes to existing knowledge base records Knowledge Base Cooperative Data Management Phase 2 Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • 5,600 + providers 3. Members can add new records and new collections. knowledge base Phase 3 Knowledge Base Cooperative Data Management Poweredbylibrarycooperation
    • Intelligent workflows Connected toaglobal datanetwork Poweredbylibrarycooperation Applications come and go, but we must build them around solving library problems, not just around standards, new technologies, and dated workflows. In conclusion…. OCLC member libraries, OCLC itself, and OCLC’s 3rd party partners comprise the largest supplier of library data. We will continue to deepen those data relationships. A rising tide floats all boats The most successful strategy for libraries is fueled by the ethos of cooperation that distinguishes both our profession and the services offered by OCLC.
    • Rene Erlandson University of Nebraska Omaha
    • University of Nebraska Omaha • Metropolitan University • 15,000+ Students • Criss & UNO-Kaneko Libraries • 1.5M eresource titles
    • • ILS • DISCOVERY • ERM • Link Resolver • A-Z List • Remote Access Authentication Local, Local, Local
    • WMS @ UNO • Meta Data/Bib Data • Acquisitions Management • Administrative Management • License Management
    • Advantages of eResource MGT in WMS • Unified Service platform • Acquisitions/Administration/Licen se Mgt • Select/Activate Discovery Access Immediately • No more manual coverage & MARC record loads • Community participation in data quality assurance & maintenance
    • • Usage Stats Dashboard • Ability to gather & embed usage data & link to cost data element • Linked access to eResource data elements within platform • Metadata separate tab • License record separate tab • Order info separate tab • Customizable Reports Wish-list
    • Discussion
    • • Report – http://oc.lc/e-resources • Article by Maria Collins and Jill Grogg: Building a Better ERMS. Library Journal 136, no. 4 (March 1, 2011): 22-28. Available at: http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/ljinprintspecialty/889092- 480/building_a_better_erms.html.csp [NISO white paper] At ERMS Length: Evaluating Electronic Resource Management Systems http://oc.lc/CollinsArticle • SlideShare posting of this PPT • Paper based on the session Resources
    • Explore. Share. Magnify. Maria Collins maria_collins@ncsu.edu Dawn Hale dhale@jhu.edu Rene Erlandson rerlandson@unomaha.edu Andrew Pace pacea@oclc.org Jill Fluvog fluvogj@oclc.org Thank you!