Bringing History into          the Digital Age:         A Case Study of     the Transition of a JournalCaitlin BakkerWilfr...
Some Background• Part of a much larger project (the university’s  institutional repository—http://scholars.wlu.ca)• Connec...
“What distinguishes communication frompublication is that publication is created by awhole process of selection, processin...
Canadian Military History• A quarterly publication of the Laurier Centre for  Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies•...
• 84% of SSH journals in English are available online• Approximately 23,700 peer-reviewed journals  publishing 1.59 millio...
SSHRC’s          Aid to Scholarly Journals• Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council  program to assist existing jo...
Lessons Learned• Understand the journal’s mandate and motivations• Learn what is not yet in place (by-laws, policies,  agr...
Revision? Agreement?                                                                                Page proofs?          ...
The Copyright Conundrum• No author agreements• Economic Rights and Moral  Rights to be considered• An index for articles f...
Copyright Transfer Agreements• A statement of authorship and originality• Indemnification for libelous materials and assur...
Gratis                      Libre• “Free beer” open          • “Free speech” open  access                      access• Rem...
Access• 2-year moving wall  • A calculated risk    • Risk can be lessened by included copyright symbols      (©) and regis...
Creating an e-Readership• Benefits of working with an established journal  • Maintaining prestige rather than building it ...
The Formula for Success• A critical mass of high-quality materials• Well-formed metadata and carefully chosen  keywords• A...
Questions?       Comments?    Canadian Military Historyis now electronically available at    http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh
References• Boismenu, G., & Beaudry, G. (2004). Scholarly journals in the new  digital world. Calgary: University of Calga...
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Bringing history into the digital age: A case study of an online journal transition.

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Given the estimated 20,000 to 25,000 scholarly journals in existence
(Morrison, 2009), the long-term sustainability and growth of a subject-specific
publication can seem tenuous. Such longevity becomes even more
precarious when the publication does not have an electronic counterpart.
This is the challenge facing Canadian Military History, a journal that has been
attracting both scholars and enthusiasts for over twenty years. In an effort to
broaden their readership, increase visibility, and streamline workflows, CMH
enlisted the services of the Laurier Library and WLU Press to transition to an
online format through Scholars Commons @ Laurier, an institutional
repository using Berkeley Electronic Press’s Digital Commons software. This
case study offers an illustration of the challenges faced and the strategies
used to overcome them, including issues surrounding copyright, access, and
digital publishing.
Presenter: Caitlin Bakker, Wilfrid Laurier University

Published in: Education, Technology
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Bringing history into the digital age: A case study of an online journal transition.

  1. 1. Bringing History into the Digital Age: A Case Study of the Transition of a JournalCaitlin BakkerWilfrid Laurier Universitycbakker@wlu.ca
  2. 2. Some Background• Part of a much larger project (the university’s institutional repository—http://scholars.wlu.ca)• Connections to the V.P. Academic & Provost, the V.P. Research, and the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies• Since October 1, 2011, 22,500 full-text downloads from 3,083 cities in 150 countries• Joint initiative of the Library and the University Press
  3. 3. “What distinguishes communication frompublication is that publication is created by awhole process of selection, processing,formatting, distribution, institutionalization offorums, recognition and archiving of paperssubmitted. This is the territory of journals.” (Boismenu & Beaudry, 2004, p. 9)
  4. 4. Canadian Military History• A quarterly publication of the Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies• Editorial board and contributors include some of the foremost scholars in the field• In print since 1992, no complete electronic edition until this point• Initial assumptions had been that working with an existing journal would be simpler than launching a new journal (partially true)
  5. 5. • 84% of SSH journals in English are available online• Approximately 23,700 peer-reviewed journals publishing 1.59 million articles every year• Enormous public interest in the discipline• But, there is a resistance to electronic publication based on a perceived lack of quality and recognition The Central Problem: How do we maintain prestige while broadening our readership?
  6. 6. SSHRC’s Aid to Scholarly Journals• Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council program to assist existing journals • Up to $30,000 CAN per journal per annum• Prerequisites for consideration include: • “Diversity and relevance of the journal’s proposed strategies for reaching the appropriate readership” • “Nature and extent of the journal’s readership, and the journal’s efforts to increase or broaden that readership” • “Impact of the journal’s articles”
  7. 7. Lessons Learned• Understand the journal’s mandate and motivations• Learn what is not yet in place (by-laws, policies, agreements)• Leave the “fun stuff” for last• Put it in writing! • By-laws (internal) • Policies (external)• Expect resistance• Manage expectations
  8. 8. Revision? Agreement? Page proofs? Selection? Function and Timelines? responsibility (Recruitment? Submission? Review?) Managing editor or editorial teams? Division of duties? Accept Author Editor Reviewers Aims & scope? Mission Selection? statement? Submission Recruitment? guidelines? Style guide? Conflict of interest? Guidelines? Reject Accountability?Simultaneous submission? Conflict of interest? CTA? Moral rights? Timelines? Complaints? Resubmission?
  9. 9. The Copyright Conundrum• No author agreements• Economic Rights and Moral Rights to be considered• An index for articles from 1992 to 2003, but nothing after• Little or no contact information for authors
  10. 10. Copyright Transfer Agreements• A statement of authorship and originality• Indemnification for libelous materials and assurance that the article contains no violation of any personal or property rights• Provisions regarding further use, including education use, deposit in IRs or subject repositories, revision and republication• Author’s rights and responsibilities (page proofs, etc.)• Moral rights Key Point: Define your terms!
  11. 11. Gratis Libre• “Free beer” open • “Free speech” open access access• Removal of price • Removal of barriers permissions barriers• Individuals are free to • Individuals can consume/read as they consume, but can please also revise, reproduce, etc.
  12. 12. Access• 2-year moving wall • A calculated risk • Risk can be lessened by included copyright symbols (©) and registering copyright • Considering journal objectives• Multiple revenue sources considered • Subscription • Advertising • Author pays • Pay-per-view
  13. 13. Creating an e-Readership• Benefits of working with an established journal • Maintaining prestige rather than building it • Steady stream of submissions• Extensive scholarly networks of editorial boards• Large back catalogue• Exposing metadata, even for subscription materials• Some journals use an incremental publishing model
  14. 14. The Formula for Success• A critical mass of high-quality materials• Well-formed metadata and carefully chosen keywords• A long-term investment of time, energy, and resources• Sheer luck
  15. 15. Questions? Comments? Canadian Military Historyis now electronically available at http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh
  16. 16. References• Boismenu, G., & Beaudry, G. (2004). Scholarly journals in the new digital world. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.• Gould, T.H.P. (2011). Protocols and challenges to the creation of a cross-disciplinary journal. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 42 (2), 105-141.• Harris, L.E. (2001). Canadian copyright law. (3rd ed.). Toronto: McGraw-Hill.• Phillips, A. (2009). Business models in journal publishing. The Future of the Academic Journal. Eds. B. Cope & A. Phillips. Oxford: Chandos. 87-104.• Solomon, D. (2008). Developing open access journals: A practical guide. Oxford: Chandos.• Xia, J. (2009). Library publishing as a new model of scholarly communication. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 40 (4), 370-383.
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