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Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios
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Steering & Sailing Rules Scenarios

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The following slides depict typical Navigation Rules scenarios encountered on inland waters.

The following slides depict typical Navigation Rules scenarios encountered on inland waters.

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  • The following slides depict typical Navigation Rules scenarios encountered on inland waters. Each slide shows a possible situation that could occur and asks you to think about the Navigation Rules being applied in each situation as well as what the task of each vessel would be. Following each scenario, please discuss the situation and determine which Navigation Rules are in play. After your discussion has ended, your instructor will give you the complete explanation regarding the correct action that should be taken. Notes have been provided for the instructor’s use.
  • Please note that, due to the limits of these slides, the proximity of the vessels is much closer than they should actually appear in real life
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation. You are a stand-on vessel and the other vessel is a give-way vessel. Rules 15 a, 16 and 17 a i, 34 a As the stand-on vessel, you must initially keep course and speed. (This is stage 1 of the stand-on rule.) Sound signal: Within ½ mile, 1 short blast indicates the vessel’s intent to pass port to port The other vessel will repeat the signal if in agreement. Otherwise, the danger signal will be sounded. Rule 34 h states that the agreement may also be reached by using the radio and, when this is the case, the sound signals are not required, but may also be used. However, if agreement is not reached over the radio, sound signals shall be exchanged in a timely manner and shall prevail.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation after the give-way vessel did not take the required action in the previous slide. Rules 15 a, 16 and 17 a ii, 34 d As the stand-on vessel, your obligation to keep course and speed has ended; you may take action to avoid a collision. (Stage 2 of the stand-on rule) Sound the danger signal: 5 short blasts The other vessel is still a give-way vessel.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation. Rules 15 a, 16 and 17 a I, 34 a You are the give way vessel. You must take early and large action to stay well clear of the other vessel and not cross ahead of it. Therefore, you can choose to alter course, slow down or stop to allow the other vessel to pass safely behind your vessel. The other vessel is the stand-on vessel and it must maintain course and speed. (stage 1 of the stand-on rule) However, the other vessel may taking avoiding action if you do not act. (Stage 2) Sound signal: Within ½ mile, 1 short blast indicates the vessel’s intent to pass port to port The other vessel will repeat the signal if in agreement. Otherwise, the danger signal will be sounded.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation. It is the same situation as was shown on the previous slide because a PWC is a power-driven vessel and must follow the rules as any other power-driven vessel. Rules 15 a, 16 and 17 a i You are the give way vessel. You must take early and large action to stay well clear of the other vessel and not cross ahead of it. Therefore, you can choose to alter course, change speed or stop to allow the other vessel to pass safely behind your vessel. The other vessel is the stand-on vessel and it must keep course and speed. (stage 1 of the stand-on rule) However, the other vessel may taking avoiding action if you do not act. (Stage 2) Sound signal: Within ½ mile, 1 short blast indicates the vessel’s intent to pass port to port The other vessel will repeat the signal if in agreement. Otherwise, the danger signal will be sounded.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts a power-driven vessel and a canoe approaching one other. Rule 2 states that it is every vessel’s responsibility to avoid a collision. Rule 8 states that any action taken by both vessels to avoid a collision must be made in ample time and in observance of good seamanship. The task of both vessels is to avoid a collision. No sound signals are needed because they are only used in situations with two power-driven vessels.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts a power-driven vessel and a sailing vessel approaching one another. Rules 16, 17 a i, and 18. You are the give way vessel. You must take early and large action to stay well clear of the other vessel. Therefore, you can choose to alter course, change speed or stop to allow the other vessel to pass safely behind your vessel. The sailing vessel’s task is stage one of the stand-on vessel rule which is that it must keep course and speed. However, the sailing vessel may taking avoiding action if you do not act. No sound signals are needed because they are only used for situations with two power-driven vessels.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts an overtaking situation. This is Rule 13, 34 c You are the give way vessel as you move to pass the other vessel. Sound signal: In sight of one another, 1 short blast indicates you intend to overtake the other vessel on your port side while 2 short blasts indicate that you intend to overtake the other vessel on your starboard side. (Remember: Port has one syllable and one blast, starboard has two syllables and two blasts) The other vessel is the stand-on vessel and it must initially keep course and speed (Stage 1 of the stand-on rule). However, the other vessel may taking avoiding action if you do not act. If in agreement, both vessels should sound the same signal.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts a power-driven vessel approaching an anchored vessel. Rule 2 states that it is every vessel’s responsibility to avoid a collision. Rule 8 states that any action taken by to avoid a collision must be made in ample time and in observance of good seamanship. Your task is to avoid a collision. No sound signal needed.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts a power-driven vessel and a sailing vessel approaching one another. (Rule 18) Your task is to give way. You must alter course, change speed or stop in order to take early, large action to stay well clear. This will allow your vessel to pass safely behind the sailing vessel. The sailing vessel’s task is stage one of the stand-on vessel rule which is that it must initially keep course and speed. However, the sailing vessel may take avoiding action if you do not act. No sound signal is needed.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels passing at a safe distance. There is no risk of collision. By the time your vessel reaches the point where the other vessel is, the other vessel will be out of the way. Sound signal: Because the vessels will be crossing within a ½ mile of each other, the rules require the use of sound signals. Two short blast indicates that you will pass behind the other vessel on your starboard side. The other vessel will return the signal if in agreement.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation. This is Rule 15. Your task is to give way. You must alter course, change speed or stop in order to take early, large action to stay well clear. This will your other vessel to pass safely behind the other vessel. The other vessel’s task is stage one of the stand-on vessel rule which is that it must keep course and speed. However, the other vessel may taking avoiding action if you do not act. This situation also highlights a Homeland Security Issue. As a matter of homeland security, all vessels are required to operate at minimum speed within 500 yards of any U.S. Naval Vessel and may not approach within 100 yards. If they are hailing you, you must stop and prepare to be boarded. Sound signal: Within ½ mile, 1 short blast indicates the vessel’s intent to pass port to port
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels in a crossing situation. This is Rule 15 a. Your task is to stand on. Initially, you must keep your course and speed. However, if the other vessel does not act soon, you may take avoiding action (Stage two of the stand-on rule) The other vessel’s task is to give way. It must alter course, change speed or stop in order to take early, large action to stay well clear to pass safely behind the other vessel. Sound signal: Within ½ mile, 1 short blast indicates the vessel’s intent to pass port to port
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts a head-on situation between two power-driven vessels on a Western River. This is Rule 14 d. A downbound power-driven vessel may claim the right-of-way over you, by proposing the manner and place of passing. Your task is to obey the downbound vessel by doing what it tells you to do.
  • What does this day shape indicate? This is a vessel engaged in fishing. Rule 18: A power-driven vessel underway shall keep out of the way of a vessel engaged in fishing. When a power-driven vessel approaches a vessel engaged in fishing, its responsibility is to give way by changing course, changing speed, or stopping in order to take early, large action to stay well clear.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts an approaching situation with three power-driven vessels. When more than two vessels are involved, it is time for Rule 8 E to be taken into effect. If you need more time to assess the situation, Rule 8 E requires you to slow down , stop, or reverse propulsion.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two power-driven vessels and a sailing vessel all involved in an approaching situation. If you need more time to assess the situation, Rule 8 E requires you to slow down , stop, or reverse propulsion.
  • What situation is shown on the screen? This slide depicts two sailing vessels and your power-driven vessel. The first sailing vessel is already past the power-driven vessel and is not at risk of collision with you. The second sailing vessel is approaching you. You are the give-way vessel according to Rule 18 which states that a power-driven vessel underway shall keep out of the way of a sailing vessel.
  • Any ideas on how to handle this situation? This slide is meant as a joke, but it should spark some discussion as to what action should be taken when the waterway is this busy.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Inland Navigation Steering and Sailing Rules Scenarios <ul><li>The view is ahead from the power-driven vessel shown at the bottom of this screen. </li></ul>Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 2. Please note that, due to the limits of these slides, the proximity of the vessels is much closer than they should actually appear in real life.
    • 3. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 4. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 5. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 6. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 7. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 8. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 9. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 10. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 11. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 12. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 13. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 14. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 15. We are on a Western River and the ferry is downbound. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 16. You are approaching a vessel displaying the following day shape: Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 17. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 18. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 19. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft
    • 20. Artwork courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft

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