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Vellinga joe Vellinga joe Presentation Transcript

  • PM Challenge 2007 STARDUST Bringing a Comet Home Lockheed Martin Space Systems Civil Space Space Exploration Systems Joe Vellinga Project Management Challenge 2007 February 6, 2007Discovery 4 PI Don Brownlee Managing Industrial Mission @ Univ of Wash Agency Partner 1
  • PM Challenge 2007STARDUST 2
  • PM Challenge 2007 Trajectory Overview Earth Gravity Earth Comet Wild-2 Assist Return Orbit 01/15/01 01/15/06 Launch 02/07/99* Loop 1 3 Loops 2&3 Annefrank 11/02/02 Earth V inf=7.2 km/s X Ecliptic Orbit Rsun=2.3 AU J2000 Wild-2 REarth=2.3 AUEncounter A 01/02/04V inf=6.1 km/s 1 Heliocentric Loops 1, 2 and 3Rsun=1.9 AU Feb 99-Jan 01, -Jul 03, -Jan 06REarth=2.6 AU B 4 Interstellar Particle Collection A-B: Feb-May 00, Aug-Dec 02 2 Deep Space Maneuvers 1: Jan 2000, 2: Jan 2002 3: Jun 2003, 4: Feb 2004 * second day of launch period Interstellar Particle Stream 3
  • PM Challenge 2007Wild 2 Encounter 4
  • PM Challenge 2007 Spacecraft Overview - at EncounterLaunch Mass: 385 kg (848 lb)-Bus: 254 kg (560 lb)-SRC: 46 kg (101 lb)-Fuel: 85 kg (187 lb) Dust Flux Monitor Instrument Thrusters 5
  • PM Challenge 2007 Cometary Dust Collection AerogelCollection Grid Navigation Camera Mirror 6
  • PM Challenge 2007Interstellar Particle Collection Aerogel Collection Grid 7
  • PM Challenge 2007Aerogel Sample Collector 1 cm Interstellar Grid 3 cm Comet Grid Particle Carrot Track 8
  • PM Challenge 2007Stardust Structure 9
  • PM Challenge 2007Whipple Shield 10
  • PM Challenge 2007Whipple Shield Does Its Job 1 cm 2 cm 5 cm 11 cm 11
  • PM Challenge 2007Dust Flux Monitor 12
  • PM Challenge 2007DFM on Whipple Shield Bumper Mass Simulator 13
  • Cometary & Interstellar Dust Analyzer PM Challenge 2007 (CIDA) 14
  • PM Challenge 2007Navigation Camera (Nav Cam) 15
  • PM Challenge 2007Stardust Assembled 16
  • PM Challenge 2007On Delta II (7426) 17
  • PM Challenge 2007Launch, 7 February 1999 18
  • PM Challenge 2007Fairing Separation 19
  • PM Challenge 2007 AnneFrank Encounter 2 Nov 2002 NavCam CCD Pixel 0 64 128 192 256 320 384 448 512 576 640 704 768 832 896 960 1024 0 Mirror Angle 120 64 Navigation put it in 110 128 192 Field of View 100 256 90 320 80 Nucleus Tracking Mirror Angle (deg.) 384 70 Control 448 60 Locked OnLine 512 50 576 Default Trajectory 40 Roll Maneuver, 640 30 If It Had Been 704 Required 768 20 832 10 896 0 720678700 720678800 720678900 720679000 720679100 720679200 720679300 720679400 720679500 720679600 720679700 720679800 720679900 720680000 720680100 720680200 720680300 960 1024 sclk 20
  • PM Challenge 200781P/Wild 2 21
  • PM Challenge 2007Orbital Evolution of Wild 2 22
  • PM Challenge 2007 Wild 2 TrailM. Ishiguro, et al, The Astrophysical Journal, 589:L101–L104, 2003 June 1,DISCOVERY OF THE DUST TRAIL OF THE STARDUST COMET SAMPLERETURN MISSION TARGET: 81P/WILD 2 23
  • PM Challenge 2007 Wild-2 Flyby GeometryWild-2 Encounter Geometry XSclosest approach: 01/02/2004 19:22:59.1 UTC SPE angle Earth Sun 17 deg 2.60 AU 1.86 AU Wild 2 V=26.4 km/sec 73 deg S/C Attitude +x // Vinf SD V=21.7 km/sec +y = ToEarth X Vinf V • = 6.12 km/s 230 km Flyby on +z = +x X +y Approach Phase Angle 73 deg Sunside +z is “rolled” 1.9 deg above the flyby plane for Earth point YS nucleus radius ~ 2.7 km coma radius ~100,000 km Earth is 16.7 degrees from XS and 1.9 degrees above the flyby plane Vinf points 2.8 degrees below the eclipiticFlyby plane coordinates (xs,ys,zs) defined by Vinf and Sun Vector Wild-2 heliocentric speed is 26.4 km, s/c is 21.7 km/s 24
  • PM Challenge 2007 Wild 2 17 November 2003• Windowed frame • Wild 2 in a 15 sec exposure 25
  • PM Challenge 2007Optical Navigation Image @ E - 14 Hours 26
  • Image 2022 PM Challenge 2007Distance=6793 kmTime=E-1113 secMirror=1.9 deg 27
  • Image 2034 PM Challenge 2007Distance=4599 kmTime=E-753 secMirror=2.7 deg 28
  • Image 2041 PM Challenge 2007Distance=3321 kmTime=E-543 secMirror=3.8 deg 29
  • Image 2044 PM Challenge 2007Distance=2773 kmTime=E-453 secMirror=4.3 deg 30
  • Image 2046 PM Challenge 2007Distance=2409 kmTime=E-393 secMirror=5.7 deg 31
  • Image 2048 PM Challenge 2007Distance=2045 kmTime=E-333 secMirror=6.6 deg 32
  • Image 2050 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1742 kmTime=E-283 secMirror=7.9 deg 33
  • Image 2052 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1320 kmTime=E-213 secMirror=10.2 deg 34
  • Image 2053 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1260 kmTime=E-203 secMirror=10.8 deg 35
  • Image 2054 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1201 kmTime=E-193 secMirror=11 deg 36
  • Image 2056 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1082 kmTime=E-173 secMirror=12.6 deg 37
  • Image 2058 PM Challenge 2007Distance=963 kmTime=E-153 secMirror=14.2 deg 38
  • Image 2059 PM Challenge 2007Distance=903 kmTime=E-143 secMirror=15 deg 39
  • Image 2060 PM Challenge 2007Distance=845 kmTime=E-133 secMirror=16 deg 40
  • Image 2061 PM Challenge 2007Distance=787 kmTime=E-123 secMirror=17.5 deg 41
  • Image 2062 PM Challenge 2007Distance=729 kmTime=E-113 secMirror=19 deg 42
  • Image 2063 PM Challenge 2007Distance=671 kmTime=E-103 secMirror=20 deg 43
  • Image 2064 PM Challenge 2007Distance=915 kmTime=E-93 secMirror=23 deg 44
  • Image 2065 PM Challenge 2007Distance=559 kmTime=E-83 secMirror=25 deg 45
  • Image 2066 PM Challenge 2007Distance=504 kmTime=E-73 secMirror=28 deg 46
  • Image 2067 PM Challenge 2007Distance=452 kmTime=E-63 secMirror=32 deg 47
  • Image 2069 PM Challenge 2007Distance=352 kmTime=E-43 secMirror=42 deg 48
  • Image 2071 PM Challenge 2007Distance=274 kmTime=E-23 secMirror=59 deg 49
  • Image 2073 Closest Approach ImageDistance=236 km PM Challenge 2007Time=E-3 secMirror=85 deg 50
  • Image 2075 PM Challenge 2007Distance=257 kmTime=E+17 secMirror=113 deg 51
  • Image 2077 PM Challenge 2007Distance=326 kmTime=E+37 secMirror=133 deg 52
  • Image 2079 PM Challenge 2007Distance=421 kmTime=E+57 secMirror=145 deg 53
  • Image 2080 PM Challenge 2007Distance=472 kmTime=E+67 secMirror=150 deg 54
  • Image 2081 PM Challenge 2007Distance=526 kmTime=E+77 secMirror=153 deg 55
  • Image 2083 PM Challenge 2007Distance=637 kmTime=E+97 secMirror=158 deg 56
  • Image 2084 PM Challenge 2007Distance=694 kmTime=E+107 secMirror=160 deg 57
  • Image 2085 PM Challenge 2007Distance=752 kmTime=E+117 secMirror=161 deg 58
  • Image 2086 PM Challenge 2007Distance=810 kmTime=E+127 secMirror=163 deg 59
  • Image 2087 PM Challenge 2007Distance=869 kmTime=E+137 secMirror=164 deg 60
  • Image 2088 PM Challenge 2007Distance=927 kmTime=E+147 secMirror=165 deg 61
  • Image 2091 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1105 kmTime=E+177 secMirror=167.6 deg 62
  • Image 2092 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1165 kmTime=E+187 secMirror=168.4 deg 63
  • Image 2094 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1285 kmTime=E+207 secMirror=169.4 deg 64
  • Image 2096 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1405 kmTime=E+227 secMirror=170.3 deg 65
  • Image 2098 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1525 kmTime=E+247 secMirror=171.1 deg 66
  • Image 2100 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1646 kmTime=E+267 secMirror=171.8 deg 67
  • Image 2104 PM Challenge 2007Distance=1888 kmTime=E+307 secMirror=172.9 deg 68
  • Image 2108 PM Challenge 2007Distance=2130 kmTime=E+347 secMirror=173.7 deg 69
  • Image 2112 PM Challenge 2007Distance=2373 kmTime=E+387 secMirror=174.3 deg 70
  • Image 2115 PM Challenge 2007Distance=3467 kmTime=E+567 secMirror=176.1 deg 71
  • PM Challenge 2007 First Image Released• Many Flat Bottomed Craters• Jets May be Coming From Walls of ‘Sublimation Craters’ 72
  • PM Challenge 2007 Encounter Attitude Control Flight Pointing Errors from Enc_Abs Attitude 4.25 X Rotat. 4.00 Y Rotat. Roll Maneuver 3.75 Z Rotat. 3.50 3.25 3.00Rotation about each Axis(degrees) 2.75 2.50 2.25 2.00 1.75 1.50 1.25 1.00 0.75 0.50 0.25 0.00 -0.25 -30.00 -20.00 -10.00 0.00 10.00 20.00 30.00 Time from Closest Approach (minutes) 73
  • PM Challenge 2007 Nucleus Tracking Location of Center of Brightness in CCD Frame 0 64 128 192 256 320 384 448 512 576 640 704 768 832 896 960 1024 0 641281922563203844485125766407047688328969601024 74
  • PM Challenge 2007 Closest Approach Closest Approach Determination 685.0 635.0 585.0 535.0 485.0km distance 435.0 Closest Approach Distance=237 km (9 km closer) 385.0 236.4 km Time =757538732 SCLK (87 seconds early) 335.0 285.0 235.0 185.0 757538632 757538652 757538672 757538692 757538712 757538732 757538752 757538772 757538792 757538812 757538832 SCLK 75
  • PM Challenge 2007 Wild 2 Jets Image 2076 Distance=2874 km Time=E+27 sec• “Dozens” of Jets Mirror=124 deg• 107 Tons of Water / Orbit (Lyman Apha Measurements)• Average Recession Rate About 0.25 m / Orbit 76
  • PM Challenge 2007 77
  • PM Challenge 2007Jet Source Regions (Sekanina et al., 2004) 78
  • PM Challenge 2007Wild 2 surface ≠ asteroid or satellite surfaces 79
  • PM Challenge 2007Wild 2 Map 80
  • PM Challenge 2007 Pit-Spall Craters• The pit/spall zone morphology is common for microcraters on lunar rocks (strength dominated)• It is unknown on larger bodies (Escape vel. Wild2 ~1 m/s) 81
  • PM Challenge 2007 Wild 2’s Spires(Monument Valley in dirty ice) spire shadow spire 82
  • PM Challenge 2007 White SpotA dust jet above the surface? Transient condensates? 3 views from different angles Blow-up 83
  • PM Challenge 2007 Particle Fluxes Fluxes (1 sec)10000 PVDF-S1 Acoustic 1 1000 Acoustic 2 Acoustic 3 100Cts 10 1 0.1 -300 0 300 600 900 T (sec) 84
  • PM Challenge 2007The Importance of Sample Return Missions• Science is done on the ground• Instrumentation is state-of-the-art and future SOA• Ultimate in precision & sensitivity• Not limited by mass, power, cost or reliability• Results can be confirmed by independent methods• Instruments can be calibrated before and after• Analysis strategies can be iterative• Samples are a resource for long into the future 85
  • PM Challenge 2007Try to Launch This . . .Or this . . . 86
  • PM Challenge 2007 Approach Events Earth Entry Decision Mechanisms: S/C ~in 1. SRC Release Enable (ground command) Release Attitude 2. SRC Release Fault Protection (spacecraft flight software) S/C in 3. SRC Release Disable (ground command) E-10d Release 05 Jan E-6d Attitude 09 Jan TCM 18,18a Enable E-29h FP Disable (2) or 13 Jan Uplink (1) Release Disable (3) TCM-19 [Fixed Attitude] E-12h SRC Release 14 Jan TCM-19a,b * Red or dashed = contingency or [19a - Fixed Attitude] single failure anomaly Bus Divert or [19b - Full Sky] E-5.7h Backup Orbit (4 yrs) -4h 125 KM -3.7h SRC ENTRY: 15 JAN 2006 09:57 UTC (02:57 MST)Deep Space Network (70-m/34-m)Near-continuous from E-30d PACIFIC OCEANDual complex/antennas for critical eventsSix antenna redundant for Release T19 T19a,b Release/Divert Utah Test & Training Range 87
  • PM Challenge 2007 Entry, Descent and Landing TCM-19,x (E-36,12h) SRC Entry (E=0h, 02:57 MST, 09:57 UTC) STRATCOM SSN V = 12.8 km/s, FPA = -8.2° Earliest: ~E-8:00, [~205,000 km*] SRC Separation (E-4h) Nominal: ~E-4:00, [~105,000 km*] [Maui: ~105,000km*, ~57° elev] End: ~E-0:00, [~3,800 km*] 125 km AtmosphereALTITUDE [ * = slant range ] EDL Events Entry+min Alt (~km MSL) 1. UTTR I/R & CINE Tracking +0.6 76 2. Peak Heating +0.9 61 1 3. Peak G-loads +1.0 53 4. 3-G Timer Start +1.9 36 5. Drogue Deploy/UTTR Skin Tracking +2.2 32 2 6. Enter UTTR Airspace +3.9 17 7. Main Chute/UHF Deploy +8.0 3 3 8. Arm Main Chute Cutter +8.3 3 9. Landing +14.6 1.2 4 Recovery Operations 5 • Helos vectored via HILL AFB MCC: 2 Vertigo + UTTR On-Scene Commander • Ground vehicles available if weather does not permit flight • Recovery crew bags SRC and returns to clean room at MAAF for GN2 purge 6 • Depart for JSC in 2 days, dedicated cargo plane To MAAF • Challenges: Night time, ground fog/inversion, water/mud/snow, cold 7 8 9 DOWNRANGE 88
  • PM Challenge 2007Utah Test and Training Range Landing Target 40° 19’ N, 113° 27’ W Baseline Delivery Ellipse 76 x 44 km, 99% 89
  • PM Challenge 2007Cross Track Downto 20 km by 1/11/06 90
  • PM Challenge 2007Navigation Criteria Diagram YELLOW DIVOT [debris casualty] DUGWAY PROPERTY [property hazards] DUGWAY POPULATION [intact src casualty] APPROVED LANDING ZONE to 95% WARNING TRACK [prediction confidence] EFPA to 99% [-8.05 to -8.35 deg] 91
  • PM Challenge 2007 92
  • PM Challenge 2007 Helicopter for Recovery Night Sun UHF AntennaIR Camera 93
  • PM Challenge 2007SRC Recovery Operations EnvironmentFull Moon Rise: 5:47 pm (MST) Jan 14SRC Entry: 2:57 amSRC Lands: 3:12 amSun Rise: 7:55 amMoon Set: 9:05 amSun Set: 5:31 pm• Average Minimum Temperature: 18.3 Deg F• Average Maximum Temperature: 34.4 Deg F• Mean Wind: 3.92 MPH (3.4 Knots) Recovery Team Prepared, Equipped and Trained For Worst Case Recovery Environment UTTR Jan 13, 2005 UTTR Feb 4, 1998 94
  • PM Challenge 2007Incoming Over Nevada – from Aircraft 95
  • PM Challenge 2007Incoming Over Nevada 96
  • PM Challenge 2007SRC After Victory Roll 97
  • PM Challenge 2007Off the Helo on Way to Clean Room 98
  • PM Challenge 2007Starting Disassembly 99
  • PM Challenge 2007Delivery to Johnson Space Center 100
  • PM Challenge 2007First Inspection of Aerogel Grid 101
  • PM Challenge 2007Particle Entry Track 102
  • PM Challenge 2007Two Fluffy Particle Impacts? 103
  • PM Challenge 2007 104
  • PM Challenge 2007Particles Along Track 105
  • PM Challenge 2007Cutting Aerogel – Harmonic Saw 106
  • PM Challenge 2007Valentine Particle 107
  • PM Challenge 2007Particle Analysis 108
  • PM Challenge 2007 Olivine (Forsterite) ParticleThis particle, a type of olivine called forsterite, was brought to Earth in theStardust sample-return capsule. The grain, encased in melted aerogel, isabout 2-millionths of a meter across. 109
  • PM Challenge 2007 Don Brownlee at Science WorkshopComet Particle Composition – many built like loose dirt-clods• large strong rocks• very fine powdery materialsRemarkable Range of Minerals• Some of these particles contain minerals that form only at extremely high temperatures – similar to "refractory" materials that formed in the hottest, innermost regions of the disk of gas and dust that formed the Sun and planets, or prior stars• Olivine (iron - primarily magnesium) and high-temperature minerals rich in calcium, aluminum and titanium Isotope ratios show: – Some formed around prior stars – Some formed inside the orbit of Mercury during formation of our Solar System 110
  • PM Challenge 2007 Stardust Web Site http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/Stardust is a NASA Discovery Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Don Brownlee of the University of Washington is the Principal Investigator. JPL provided the Navigation Camera and performed mission design, navigation and DSN communications and tracking. Images and art work used in this presentation can be found on the JPL Stardust web site above. 111
  • PM Challenge 2007 What Did We Do?, Technically: PLAN ACTUAL• Launch on 2/6/99 • Launch 2/7/99 (LV Delay) – Recovered from LV Error (312 kg instead of 366 kg) • Self Despin (1 kg Hydrazine)• Go to 2.7 AU on Solar Power • Went to 2.7 AU with no Problems – Invented S/A Switching Unit• Collect Interstellar Particles for • Collected Interstellar Particles for > 150 days 195 days• Encounter Wild 2 on 1/2/04 • Dry Run Encounter at Asteroid – Collect > 1000 >15µ Particles Annefrank 11/2/02 (at no cost ↑) – Survive up to 1 cm Rocks • Encounter 1/2/04 – More than Enough; Many Broke up – 7 ‘Rocks’ ≥ 0.3 cm w/o Damage• Return to Earth @ 12.8 km/sec • Returned @ 12.8 km/sec – Fastest Ever Man Made Object – New Heatshield Material → Orion 112
  • PM Challenge 2007 What Did We Do?, Programmatically: PLAN ACTUAL• Mid Feb 1999 Launch • Ready for Launch at Opening of Window 2/6/99 – Met All Commitment Dates to Environmental Facilities and Arrival @ KSC• $164.6 M Phases A-E • < $164.6 M Through 2004 – 12% Reserve Ph C/D – Consumed 11.2% of Reserve Ph C/D• Return & Recovery Critical • NASA Added Return & Recovery Event Readiness Reviews Risk Reviews in 2005 for $10 M Planned – CAIB Report: • Stardust Shift from Mission Success → Fail Safe • All Risks Known & Communicated to NASA Management – Genesis MIB Recommendations 113
  • PM Challenge 2007How Did We Do It On Time & In Cost?• KISS• Attitude• Requirements ≤ Capability• NO!!! Requirements Creep• Team Partnership• Virtual Co-Location• Good Enough• EVM +• Risk Management• Dedication of Team 114
  • PM Challenge 2007 KISS• ’94 Proposal Kept to Focused Science Mission• Primary Science: – Interstellar Dust Collection – Hence the name: Stardust – Cometary Particle Collection – Sample Return• Secondary & Tertiary Science – In-Situ Particle Analysis with Mass Spectrometer • Contributed Instrument from Germany – Dust Flux Monitor – Nucleus Images using Navigation Camera Mission had been Offered as ≈$800M Program but NOT Sold. Now we Offered it at 1/4th the Cost 115
  • PM Challenge 2007 Attitude• No Overrun!! → Termination (for Real!) – Mark Saunders, NASA HQ Discovery Program Manager: • No Question or Doubt of Termination if EVM Projected > Committed Cost • PI Had to Declare Team Couldn’t Do It – NO!!! 15% NASA Overrun Allowance• Team Believed we Could and Would Do It In Cost – Designed to Cost: Stayed Within Capability of Available Hardware – Prepared to Make any Compromises Necessary to Do It – However, Never Needed to Compromise or Descope – How We Would Do It was Up to Us – Manage Reserve to Stay in Committed Cost You have to Believe You Can Do It. 116
  • PM Challenge 2007 Requirements ≤ Capability• Phase B SRR was “Capability & Requirements Review” – Culmination of Design to Cost – Each CAM Presented Cost Commitment – Learned of LV Capability Error During Dry Run (366 kg → 312 kg)• Short Schedule (28 month Phase C/D) = Buy Components & Make Program Fit – Committed $7M of Major Subcontracts Before PDR Design to ≤ Cost 117
  • PM Challenge 2007 NO!!! Requirements Creep• Mantra: “Do Not Allow Requirements Creep Camel to get his Nose Under the Tent” – PI, Don Brownlee, Gave Ken Atkins, Development Project Manager, Toy Camel at Ken’s Retirement in Commemoration• Turned Down Improvement ‘Opportunities’ – Addition of Volatiles Capture Mechanism Pushed by Science Team • Concept Study Done • Unknown Risks if Development Approved – TPS Instrumentation • Pushed by ARC Up Through NASA HQ • Unknown Additional Risk in New Heatshield that was Already Highest Risk in Program• One Improvement Incorporated: Variable Density Aerogel @ No Additional Cost When Cost is Committed, Requirements ARE FROZEN 118
  • PM Challenge 2007 Team PartnershipPartners: NASA, PI, Agent (JPL), Industrial Partner (LM)• 4 Party Agreement Signed by All: Committed Science to be Accomplished, Schedule & Cost• PI Participated in All Major Reviews & Meetings – Maintained Cognizance Throughout• JPL Managed Project & Provided Camera, Navigation, DSMS & Mission Ops with LM – Participated in LM Activity but Small Team Limited Oversight/Insight• LM Developed Spacecraft & Capsule, Conducted Mission with JPL, Lead Recovery – All Activity Open to JPL & PI – Operated with Independence but Full JPL Knowledge – Risks Mitigated by Investment of Excess Reserve Partnership Works 119
  • PM Challenge 2007 Virtual Co-Location• Replicating Servers Through Fire Walls• Telecons with Each End Pulling Briefing or other Material Off Their Own Server• Periodic Face-to-Face Meetings – Need to Know Partners Lose Your Frequent Flyer Status! 120
  • PM Challenge 2007 Good EnoughDuring Development I was Often Asked How do you do FBC, What do you Leave Out of ProgramAnswer: Nothing Left Out, But Less Depth• Bounding Analyses, Particularly EDL – As Built Analyses Not Done if Still ‘In Box’• Good Enough – Entry Flight Path Angle Didn’t Use all of UTTR – One Spacecraft Test Lab Find the Good Enough for Project Environment 121
  • PM Challenge 2007 EVM +• Baselined Schedule & Resources in 3rd Month of Phase C/D – Entire Program Through Launch – Microsoft Project for Schedule – Margin: ≥ 1 mo Delivery to ATLO; ATLO 2 mo in Denver; 1 mo at KSC – All in Resource Baseline (Funded) – About 9000 Milestones in LM Schedule• Earned Value Determined Each Month – CAMS at Subsystem Level – EVM Integrity = Definitive Milestones + Honesty in Assessing Intermediate Status – Focused on Early Identification of Problems – Quickly Developed Workaround Plans• Biggest Challenges: – Staffing Up – Late Deliveries to ATLO – Electronic Parts – Forced Five Openings of Spacecraft – Heatshield (TRL 4 to Flight in About 2 Years) 122
  • PM Challenge 2007 EVM + (continued) Staffing Slower than Planned STARDUST ENGRG STAFFING PLAN, BUDGET & ACTUALS-9/7/97 PDO Reqs-Open² <<PDR CDR ² Project Reqs-Open140 ENGRG BUDGET BASELINE REV-6/1/97 CDR PDO Reqs-Firm Project Reqs-Firm PDO - On Board Project-On Board120 ACTUALS THRU 9/7/9710080604020 0 OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1996 1997 123
  • PM Challenge 2007 EVM + (continued) LMA Total Program Variances Schedule Variance Cost Variance $1.0 $0.0Millions of Dollars ($1.0) ($2.0) ($3.0) ($4.0) Staffing ($5.0) Challenge ($6.0) ($7.0) Qtr 4 96 Qtr 1 97 Qtr 2 97 Qtr 3 97 Qtr 4 97 Qtr 1 98 Qtr 2 98 Qtr 3 98 Qtr 4 98 Qtr 1 99 Baseline ATLO Start Launch 124
  • PM Challenge 2007 EVM + (continued)• Independent Milestone Count – Good Agreement with EVM At Apr 26, 1998 Planned = 8723 Actuals = 8382 96.1% 1.1 (Act/Base) 0.9 CUM 0.7 0.5 MAY MAR FEB JUL SEP NOV APR AUG DEC JAN JUN OCT 1000 10000 900 9000 800 8000 CUM EVENTS 700 7000 600 6000 500 5000 400 4000 300 3000 200 2000 100 1000 0 0 DEC DEC JUN JUN JAN MAR JUL JAN MAR JUL NOV APR MAY AUG NOV APR MAY AUG OCT SEP OCT SEP FEB FEB FY 97 | FY 98 Baseline Plan Current Schedule Completed CUM Baseline CUM Current Plan CUM Actuals 125
  • PM Challenge 2007 EVM + (continued) • ATLO Schedule Margin Tracked Daily ASSEMBLY & TEST SCHEDULE MARGIN PLAN 45 40 Post-Bus GREEN 35 FunctionalDAYS OF MARGIN 3/18/98 30 Delayed Move to MTF 25 YELLOW 20 * Pre-Ship 15 10/6/98 10 RED 5 0 Feb-98 Aug-98 Oct-98 Sep-98 Nov-98 Jun-98 Jan-98 Apr-98 May-98 Jul-98 Mar-98 MONTHS EVM – Must Do BUT at Value Added Level 126
  • PM Challenge 2007 Risk Management• Identified Risks Early• TPMs to Track Technical Status & Identify RisksSpacecraft (3 mo to Launch): 11.5 kg Wet Mass Margin including thermal liens;Mass G Margin allows launch with full tank & ΔV Margin; and ²V Actual Weight 0.4 kg < CBE 19.2% at Aphelion (24 watts)Power G Powered On Testing (~10 watt additional margin) Thermal Mods Liens TBDPropellant G ΔV 5.3% margin to ²V Budget (377mps)CPU Throughput G 62% Processor Utilization at EncounterDRAM Memory G 128 Mbytes - 28 FSW; 75 N-Cam; 13 CIDA; 2 DFM; 10 Downlink 40% Margin (3 Mbytes Prom) ContainsEEPROM Memory G Entire FSW LoadSoftware Maturity Y 61% ATP Dry Run and 40% ATP Complete Sequence Testing SPT #1, #2, #3 Complete Fault Protection Testing In-Work 127
  • PM Challenge 2007 Risk Management (continued)SRC (3 months to Launch)Mass 45.7 kg weighed Vs 44 to 46 Rqmt G (+0.2 kg Parachute Lid Mod)Power 100% Margin; Redundant Batteries GStability 6 DOF Simulations Verify Stability at G Spin Rate, X/D & b; > 3 s Entries within Design Limits (99.86% Successful out of 3000 Cases)Mass Properties X/D =.348 Vs. .351 Requirement G Spin Rate 12 rpm with failed spring Vs. 12 - 18 rpm Rqmt b = 59 Vs. 60 kg/m2 RqmtLanding Footprint 61 km x 23 km (3 Sigma) Vs. 84 x 30 km G UTTR Rqmt (6 DOF Sims)Parachute Performance Mortar Deploy Tests by Pioneer G UTTR Balloon Drop Test (impact speed < 15fps)PICA Performance 30% Thickness Margin Based on PICA to G Structure Bondline T = 250°C 128
  • PM Challenge 2007 Risk Management (continued) Project Fever Summary (7 months to Launch) Technical Schedule Resources M ar Apr M ay M ar Apr M ay M ar Apr M ay G G G G G Y G G G DEC JAN FEB MAR APR JUNPROJECT Y Y Y Y Y Y Cost G G G G G G Reserves Look OK Key Agreements R R Y G G G NEPA-EA G G G G G G FONSI signed and publishedFLIGHT SYSTEM Cost vs Budget G G G G G G Staffing G G Y Y G G Staff Rolling Off Schedule (To Atlo) Y Y Y Y G G Schedule (To Launch) G G G G Y Y 21 Days Pre-Ship margin remains Performance G G G G G G C&DH (PACI) - Interface Robustness being worked as backup Margins G G G G G G Interfaces Y Y Y Y Y G Plan Working to Gain Robustness -- R/R Buy of FPGAs Sample Return Capsule G G G G G G ACS Starcam Procure Y Y G G G G Delivered ACS IMU Procurement R R Y Y Y G Flight Software G G G G G G Pre-ATLO Testing-SMTS G G G G G GSCIENCE: Aerogel & Collector R R R Y Y Y Flight Production & Gradient Density Qual. CIDA Y Y G G G G Dust Flux Monitor G G G G G GMISSION G G G G G G NavCam Y Y Y G Y G Delivered & Installed Navigation G G G G G G Mission Design & Plan G G G G G G Operations Development G G G G G G Facility Operational @ JPL Launch Vehicle G G G Y Y G Boeing swap made in fab flow. Progress OK 129
  • PM Challenge 2007 Risk Management (continued)• Reviewed Weekly & Monthly – Description & Status – Estimated Resource Required to Mitigate 130
  • PM Challenge 2007 Risk Management (Continued)• Invested Reserve > 10% To Go in Risk Mitigation – Electronics Board & Box Test Sets – ATLO Test Units (C&DH and PCA) – Soft Sim Work Risk Hard from Beginning to End Invest Excess Reserve Wisely 131
  • PM Challenge 2007 Dedication of Team• People Like Working Science Programs• Fast Programs are Very Appealing• Almost No Attrition – A Few Retirements• People Move from Development to Mission Operation back to Development• Team Very Committed to Stardust – Proving that it was Working Properly – Done on Time or Acceptable Work Around Esprit de Corps is Worth a Lot 132
  • PM Challenge 2007Here’s to Your Project BeingMore Successful than Stardust 133