Private RisksTrust and Communication
Introduction  Many challenges may affect the  outcome of a project  Unexpressed Risks can endanger any  effort  Risks that...
Private Risks Lead Project Failure  “28% of respondents reply that lack of  communication is the main cause of  project fa...
Topics of Discussion What Are Private Risks? What is Trust? How Can Communication Affect Private Risk Reporting? How Do We...
What are Private Risks? Private Risks are project risks that relate to personal or confidential issues Private Risks could...
Examples of Private Risks Two team members have a personal dispute A project member is not well compensated A project memb...
The Science of Trust FMRI studies have been exploring the brain’s behavior in trust relationships Neural responses drive b...
The Science of Trust         Brooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer, Steven R. Quartz. (2005).    ...
The Science of Trust         Brooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer, Steven R. Quartz. (2005).    ...
Trust Without trust, private risks cannot be expressed Trust is hard to measure, but it’s absence is easy to detect Intern...
Building Trust  Learn personal details and remember them  (lessons from sales techniques)  Demonstrate your track record (...
Communication Focused communication can be used to increase trust Private risks are not communicated, except in general te...
Communication Strategy Communicate Goals   Frame the Work   Define Goals Clearly Define Rewards that are aligned to the co...
Communication Tactics Project Management does not happen behind a desk. MBWA - Skip Level face to face Weekly Face to Face...
Maximizing Private Risk Reporting Understand the Current Environment Communicate Goals Establish Your Responses, Aligned t...
Gathering Private Risks Gathering private risks involves building trust A safe environment must be created at each managem...
Protecting Private Risks  Private Risks cannot be shared outside of the  relationship between project manager and the  rep...
Managing Private Risks A private risk register Populated with source, impact and likelihood Aggregated to determine contin...
What If Trust is Already Lost? Expose and face the situation honestly Communicate the new direction Prepare for resistance...
And if that doesn’t work?  Mix it up     Reform small teams and groups     Find those that exhibit the behavior you want a...
And if that doesn’t work?  Bad Reputations can be unfair  Bad Attitudes can be contagious  New Faces Have No Baggage  Try ...
Questions?Ask Me Anything…  Robert.A.Hanna@jpl.nasa.gov
ReferencesBrooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer,Steven R. Quartz. (2005). Getting to Know You: Re...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Robert.hanna

13,582 views
13,576 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
13,582
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Robert.hanna

  1. 1. Private RisksTrust and Communication
  2. 2. Introduction Many challenges may affect the outcome of a project Unexpressed Risks can endanger any effort Risks that are personal or private are just as important as traditional risks
  3. 3. Private Risks Lead Project Failure “28% of respondents reply that lack of communication is the main cause of project failure” -CompTIA 57% of project failure due to a breakdown in communication - Bull Study (1998)
  4. 4. Topics of Discussion What Are Private Risks? What is Trust? How Can Communication Affect Private Risk Reporting? How Do We Manage Private Risks? What Can You Do If Trust is Lost?
  5. 5. What are Private Risks? Private Risks are project risks that relate to personal or confidential issues Private Risks could damage morale if they were widely known Private Risks could damage customer and sponsor relationships if they were widely known
  6. 6. Examples of Private Risks Two team members have a personal dispute A project member is not well compensated A project member is having a life event A marriage A child A divorce The death of a loved one A terminal disease A supplier shares confidential company information in an NDA
  7. 7. The Science of Trust FMRI studies have been exploring the brain’s behavior in trust relationships Neural responses drive behavior The Investor-Trustee Relationship Malevolent Behavior Neutral Behavior Benevolent Behavior Looking for “Intention to Trust” signals Delayed in early rounds Anticipatory in late rounds People build a model of trust Accuracy at predicting responses increases
  8. 8. The Science of Trust Brooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer, Steven R. Quartz. (2005). Getting to Know You: Reputation and Trust in a Two Sided Economic Exchange. Science. 308 (5718), 78-83.
  9. 9. The Science of Trust Brooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer, Steven R. Quartz. (2005). Getting to Know You: Reputation and Trust in a Two Sided Economic Exchange. Science. 308 (5718), 78-83.
  10. 10. Trust Without trust, private risks cannot be expressed Trust is hard to measure, but it’s absence is easy to detect Internal critics, dutiful silence, lack of debate, and schadenfreude are all signs of lost trust
  11. 11. Building Trust Learn personal details and remember them (lessons from sales techniques) Demonstrate your track record (change it if necessary) Reward the behavior of reporting risks (The carrot principle) Repeat, Repeat, Repeat: Consistent behavior builds trust
  12. 12. Communication Focused communication can be used to increase trust Private risks are not communicated, except in general terms Communicate risks down, as well as up Communicating issues down can help to establish better trust relationships
  13. 13. Communication Strategy Communicate Goals Frame the Work Define Goals Clearly Define Rewards that are aligned to the communicated Goals Poll for risks that interfere with achieving those communicated goals
  14. 14. Communication Tactics Project Management does not happen behind a desk. MBWA - Skip Level face to face Weekly Face to Face Status Monthly All-Hands, management, stakeholder meetings Quarterly Strategic Planning All Meeting Minutes taken in detail, all comments attributed, available to everyone
  15. 15. Maximizing Private Risk Reporting Understand the Current Environment Communicate Goals Establish Your Responses, Aligned to Goals, for Desired Behavior Establish Trust Through Consistency
  16. 16. Gathering Private Risks Gathering private risks involves building trust A safe environment must be created at each management level An expectation of rewards for behaviors must be established Remember that everyone’s behavior makes sense to them
  17. 17. Protecting Private Risks Private Risks cannot be shared outside of the relationship between project manager and the reporter of the risk If held in an electronic format, it should be encrypted and have restricted access They cannot be used for lessons learned, unless very sanitized (separating from the project and reporter)
  18. 18. Managing Private Risks A private risk register Populated with source, impact and likelihood Aggregated to determine contingency budgets Let’s examine an example Risk Tracker
  19. 19. What If Trust is Already Lost? Expose and face the situation honestly Communicate the new direction Prepare for resistance Be consistent Reward positive change in tangible ways Be patient
  20. 20. And if that doesn’t work? Mix it up Reform small teams and groups Find those that exhibit the behavior you want and use them to evangelize Identify informal leaders Engage them in project issues and concerns Recognize their influence Focus them on the project goals Form Triads (groups of three to wield influence)
  21. 21. And if that doesn’t work? Bad Reputations can be unfair Bad Attitudes can be contagious New Faces Have No Baggage Try Again Somewhere Else Start Fresh with a new project or organization Apply all of the lessons from inception
  22. 22. Questions?Ask Me Anything… Robert.A.Hanna@jpl.nasa.gov
  23. 23. ReferencesBrooks King-Casas, Damon Tomlin, Cedric Anen, Colin F. Camerer,Steven R. Quartz. (2005). Getting to Know You: Reputation and Trustin a Two Sided Economic Exchange. Science. 308 (5718), 78-83.Aubrey C. Daniels (2000). Bringing Out The Best in People. NewYork: McGraw-Hill.Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman (1999). First Break All theRules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently. New York:Simon & SchusterPatrick M. Lencioni (2002). The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: ALeadership Fable. San Francisco: Jossey-BassAdrian Gostick and Chester Elton (2007). The Carrot Principle: Howthe Best Managers Use Recognition to Engage Their Employees,Retain Talent and Drive Performance. New York: Free Press

×