NASA Technology Landscape                        PM Challenge                       Galveston, Texas                      ...
Technology in Extreme Environments                                                  • Launch $                            ...
Technology Drivers: Human Spaceflight              Productivity                                  Safety• Human-Machine Sym...
Examples of Critical Technology Needs: Human Spaceflight• Entry, Descent, and Landing Technology• Nuclear Propulsion and P...
Space Operations Mission Directorate                                    Space  Space Shuttle                  Communicatio...
ISS SpecificationsAssembly Complete Dimensions  Length: 59 m  Width: 108.5 m  Weight: 419,573 kg  Volume: 963 cubic meters...
International Space Station OverviewSalient Features   Complex of research laboratories in low Earth    orbit (LEO) in wh...
Science ModulesDestiny            Columbus                 Kibo          Overarching Constraints:            • Up Mass    ...
Technology Challenges/Priorities: SOMDSpace Communications          Space Transportation• Optical Communication      • Aut...
The Science Mission Directorate                                  10                                  10
Technology Challenges/Priorities: SMD• New Remote Sensing Technologies to better see,  detect, and measure the Earth, the ...
Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD)Fundamental Aeronautics                   Aviation Safety   Airspace System...
Aeronautics Mission DirectorateThe Overarching Mission of NASA’s Aeronautics Research MissionDirectorate (ARMD):  To adva...
Aeronautics Research Programs     Fundamental Aeronautics Program                                   Aviation Safety Progra...
Innovative Partnerships ProgramMatching Technology Needs with Technology Capabilities                                     ...
Innovative Partnerships Program Elements Technology          Innovation       Partnership   Infusion           Incubator  ...
What Does IPP Provide?• Funding or Leveraged Resources   – NASA SBIR/STTR funds several hundred small businesses   – IPP S...
Mars Exploration Rovers   SBIR Technology Infusion Examples                                                  Lithium-ion  ...
Interested in Partnering with NASA?          Contact the relevant IPP Center Chief(s):Center   Name              Email    ...
National Aeronautics and Space Administration               www.nasa.gov                                                20...
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Mino

  1. 1. NASA Technology Landscape PM Challenge Galveston, Texas February 9-10, 2010 Minoo N. Dastoor Chief TechnologistUsed with permission NASA, IPP Office
  2. 2. Technology in Extreme Environments • Launch $ High performance • Aeronautics Applications weight • Human Habitats Meteorite Impact & Dust Multifunctional Resistance Intelligence• Highly electrostatic• Ultrafine • Scientific Productivity• Human Habitats • Human “Amplifiers” • IVHM Extreme Radiation Ultra-sensitive Resistance Signal capture• Mission to Europa: Extreme • Lunar Surface: • Voyager: 1-5 Mrads Temperature -233 °C to 123 °C Signal From 9.3 x 109mi Resistance • Mars Surface: -87 °C to -5 °C 22
  3. 3. Technology Drivers: Human Spaceflight Productivity Safety• Human-Machine Symbiosis • Radiation• Sensors/Nano-electronics/ • Life Support Computing• Data Mining Human • Counter Measures • Vehicle Health Mgmt.• Full Cells/Energy Storage Spaceflight Cost • High Strength/Light Weight • Multifunctionality • Thermal Management 3
  4. 4. Examples of Critical Technology Needs: Human Spaceflight• Entry, Descent, and Landing Technology• Nuclear Propulsion and Power• LOX-Methane Propulsion and Cryogenic Propellant Storage• Closed-Loop Life Support• Surface Mobility Systems• In-Situ Resource Utilization Systems• High Bandwidth Communications• Radiation Protection 4
  5. 5. Space Operations Mission Directorate Space Space Shuttle CommunicationsInternational Space Space Station Transportation 5
  6. 6. ISS SpecificationsAssembly Complete Dimensions Length: 59 m Width: 108.5 m Weight: 419,573 kg Volume: 963 cubic metersOrbital inclination/path51.6 degrees, covering 90% ofthe world’s populationAltitude Approximately 370 km above the EarthSpeed28,000 kph, orbiting theEarth 16 times a day 6
  7. 7. International Space Station OverviewSalient Features Complex of research laboratories in low Earth orbit (LEO) in which U.S. and international astronauts conduct scientific and technological investigations in a space environment International Partnership including ESA, CSA, JAXA and RSA Heavily dependent on crew and cargo transportation by multiple capabilities from several countriesPartners: Objectives  Support scientific research for human space Canadian Space Agency exploration and other activities requiring the unique attributes of humans in space European Space Agency  Consistent with the Vision for Space Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Exploration, ISS research is focused on science and technology development that will prepare human explorers to travel beyond National Aeronautics and LEO Space Administration  Advance the international collaboration of Russian Federal Space Agency peaceful human space flight endeavors 7
  8. 8. Science ModulesDestiny Columbus Kibo Overarching Constraints: • Up Mass • Power • Down Mass • Crew Time 8 8
  9. 9. Technology Challenges/Priorities: SOMDSpace Communications Space Transportation• Optical Communication • Automated Optical Tracking and Identification• Spacecraft RF Technology • Transportation Test• Antenna Array Transmit Requirements and Technology Instrumentation• Programmable • Automated Collection and Communication System Transfer of Data 9
  10. 10. The Science Mission Directorate 10 10
  11. 11. Technology Challenges/Priorities: SMD• New Remote Sensing Technologies to better see, detect, and measure the Earth, the sun, the solar system, and the universe• Large, Lower Cost, Lightweight Mirrors and Space- Deployable Structures for the next generation of large telescopes and antennas• Novel Platforms, including power and propulsion technologies, that can take instruments to new vantage points• Intelligent Distributed Systems that enable advanced communications, efficient data processing and transfer, and autonomous operations of land- and space-based assets• Information Synthesis to derive useful knowledge from extremely large data sets through visualization, advanced simulations, analysis, and seamlessly linked models 11
  12. 12. Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD)Fundamental Aeronautics Aviation Safety Airspace Systems Aeronautics Test 12
  13. 13. Aeronautics Mission DirectorateThe Overarching Mission of NASA’s Aeronautics Research MissionDirectorate (ARMD):  To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research.  ARMD supports the Agencys goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD’s research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 13419.The Three Core Principles of ARMD:  We will dedicate ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of Aeronautics for the Nation in all flight regimes.  We will focus our research in areas that are appropriate to NASA’s unique capabilities.  We will directly address the fundamental research needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in partnership with the member agencies of the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO). 13
  14. 14. Aeronautics Research Programs Fundamental Aeronautics Program Aviation Safety Program Conduct cutting-edge research that will produce Conduct cutting-edge research that will produceinnovative concepts, tools, and technologies to enable innovative concepts, tools, and technologies to revolutionary changes for vehicles that fly in all speed improve the intrinsic safety attributes of current and regimes. future aircraft. SVS HUD Airspace Systems Program Directly address the fundamental ATM research needs for NextGen by developing revolutionary concepts, capabilities, and technologies that will enable significant increases in the capacity, efficiency and flexibility of the NAS. 14
  15. 15. Innovative Partnerships ProgramMatching Technology Needs with Technology Capabilities 15
  16. 16. Innovative Partnerships Program Elements Technology Innovation Partnership Infusion Incubator Development• Small Business • Centennial • Intellectual Innovation Challenges Property Research (SBIR) • FAST Management• Small Business • Technology • Innovation Technology Transfer Transfusion Transfer • Innovative • New Innovative Research (STTR) Technology Partnerships• IPP Seed Fund • New Business Models 16 16
  17. 17. What Does IPP Provide?• Funding or Leveraged Resources – NASA SBIR/STTR funds several hundred small businesses – IPP Seed Fund seeks partnerships to leverage resources with the private sector and other Federal labs – Centennial Challenges offers millions in purses• Technology and Software – Access through licensing or other partnerships• Access to Facilities and Test Capabilities – Access to NASA’s facilities through partnerships – Technology demonstration opportunities through FAST• Expertise – Access to NASA’s technical expertise through partnerships• Facilitation to enable partnerships• Advocacy as a change agent to try new things 17
  18. 18. Mars Exploration Rovers SBIR Technology Infusion Examples Lithium-ion batteries for Stardust and Orion battery packs. Heat switches to control ASCII chip for radiator for memory modules electronics and analog-to- package. digital converters.Space Shuttle and ISS Mars Phoenix Lander
  19. 19. Interested in Partnering with NASA? Contact the relevant IPP Center Chief(s):Center Name Email PhoneARC Lisa Lockyer Lisa.L.Lockyer@nasa.gov (650) 604-0149DFRC Gregory Poteat Gregory.A.Poteat@nasa.gov (661) 276-3872GRC Kathy Needham Kathleen.K.Needham@nasa.gov (216) 433-2802GSFC Nona Cheeks Nona.K.Cheeks@nasa.gov (301) 286-8504JPL Andrew Gray Gray@jpl.nasa.gov (818) 354-4906JSC Michele Brekke Michele.A.Brekke@nasa.gov (281) 483-4614KSC Dave Makufka David.R.Makufka@nasa.gov (321) 867-6227LaRC Beth Plentovich Elizabeth.B.Plentovich@nasa.gov (757) 864-2857MSFC Jim Dowdy Jim.Dowdy@nasa.gov (256) 544-7604SSC Ramona Travis Ramona.E.Travis@nasa.gov (228) 688-1660 19 19
  20. 20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov 20 20

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