Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Ken.reightler
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Ken.reightler

13,099
views

Published on

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
13,099
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Lockheed Martin’s Approach To Mission Success Kenneth S. Reightler VP, NASA Program Integration Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company
  • 2. Mission Success AtSpace Systems Company Mission Success is just one thing: “Delivering quality products and services that meet or exceed Customer requirements.” Mission Success ORGANIZATIONS PROCESSES PEOPLE FACILITIES• Program Office • Directives • Training • Test Chambers• Engineering • Policies and • Motivation • M&P Labs (including CPEs!) Procedures • Ethics • HazMat Control• Procurement • Design Specifications • Process Discipline • Clean Rooms • Best Practices• Product Assurance • Process • Tools• Mission Success Execution • Independent Reviews• ManufacturingOrganizations, Processes, People and Facilities contribute to the achievement of Mission Success. 2
  • 3. Mission Success Is … Providing our customers with the highest quality products and services which meet or exceed the required performance levels • A philosophy … – An obsession – No tolerance for compromise – A dedication to success • An attitude … – A personal responsibility and priority – An individual and team commitment to doing things right • An Organization … – Independent, outside the existing functions – Focused on root cause, corrective action and readiness – Chartered to provide oversight and check & balance Mission Success Is Everyone’s Job, Every Day! 3
  • 4. Failure “Cycle” 1985 - 2006 LMSSC and LMSSC Heritage Programs, Delta LV Program, STS, Proton (ILS) Total Mission Success Events Show n (Boxed Numbers) from 1999 through 2006 7 61 6 1 5 5 5 Q a tity 4 1 un 3 1 3 3 55 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 46 41 27 33 29 30 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Ye ar Heritage LM Failures Delta Failures STS Failures Proton Failures (ILS) 1985 – Titan 34D-7 1997 – Delta 7925, FBM 1986 – STS-51L, Titan 34D-9, Delta 3914 1998 – Titan IV A20, Delta III 1987 – Atlas AC-67 1999 – TIVB-27 (IUS – Boeing Assoc. Contract) Athena Ikonos 1, 1988 – Titan 34D-3 Titan IV B32/TC-14, Delta III, Mars Climate Observer, Mars 1990 – Commercial Titan CT-2, FBM Polar Lander 1991 – Atlas AC-70 2000 – FBM, PLV 1992 – TSS Deployment, Mars Observer, 2001 – FBM Atlas AC-71 2002 – Proton (Astra 1K) 1993 – Titan IVA-11, ACTS, Atlas AC-74, 2003 – STS-107 TIROS NOAA-13, Landsat 6 2004 – Genesis (Hard Landing) 1994 – FBM, Telstar 402 2006 – Proton 1995 – DLV-1, Telstar 401, NOAA E, Delta 7925 [Delta LV failures included for comparison purposes] Mission Success – Emphasis on Process Control, Risk Identification and Lessons Learned 4
  • 5. Recent Mission Success Losses Genesis • Design process inverted the G-switch sensor design • Design review and verification process did not detect error Partial loss of science data Columbia • External Tank insulating foam struck Shuttle left wing • Significant organizational and cultural factors Loss of Space Shuttle Columbia and Crew THAAD FT-8, 9 • Foreign object debris • Design margins not sufficient Failure of missile to intercept target Titan IV B-32 • Incorrect Roll rate coefficient entered • Single point human failure went undetected Milstar spacecraft delivered to unusable orbit Titan IV A-20 • Wiring harness damage during installation • Standard inspection and testing did not detect Loss of critical NRO spacecraft Mars Programs • Incorrect and inconsistent measurement units used • Insufficient testing with unresolved anomalies Climate Orbiter and Polar Lander spacecraft lost Athena LV • Design deficiency in PLF separation system • Qualification by similarity not thoroughly reviewed Loss of IKONOS-1 spacecraft Majority of Failures Attributable to Engineering Errors 5
  • 6. Causes of Major Failures • Single point human failures (software or table errors) • Failure to ‘test as you fly’ • Inadequate qualification of new technology • Failure to follow written procedures • Requirements flow down escapes • Foreign Object Debris (FOD) • Failure to reach root cause on anomalies Small escapes resulting in major consequences 6
  • 7. 7 Key Elements of Mission Success • Mission Success Advocate • Failure Resolution • Lien/Impact Management • Unverified Failure Management • Problem Notification and Lessons Learned • Independent Review • Internal Audit 7
  • 8. Mission Success is Continuous Throughoutthe Program’s Life Cycle CAPTURE DEVELOP/ACQUIRE PRODUCE DEPLOY OPERATE/SUPPORT DISPOSE BUSINESS SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM ATP SRR PDR CDR TRR IRR PMSR MISSION EVENT ON ORBIT EVENT Program Manager Advisor / Recognized Technical Expertise Assure Failure Resolution Adequacy Lien / Impact Management Unverified Failure Management Bulletin / GIDEP / Lessons Learned Processing and Closure Review External Independent Review Management Internal Audit 8
  • 9. Mission Success Heritage Programs Shuttle External Atlas Titan Orion Tank Annual $325M $500M $700M Sales Launches/yr 4 5 4 4-6 Organization 1700 1000 2200 2000 Staff Mission Success 2 4 14 5 Staff 9
  • 10. Mission Success Takes Teamwork l ova ed pr oce Ap Pr To r t PMSR io en n m t Se ge igh Company a s EWT SMRT an ver Oversight M O i g al Responsibility LOB/RTG rs on ht ve ti O nc Fu Insight / Oversight lu m n IOR CPE/TC Cert. IRR so ra tio Re og Pr MRB FRB CAB ERB UVF se am e CCB GIDEP/MSB/LLN PMP Ba ogr Program lin Pr Responsibility Design Rqmts Verification Plan Risk Mgmt n tio Acceptance Plan Supplier Quality Error Prevention da un FoFunctional CMMI Command Media Trained PeopleDepartment Tools FacilitiesProcesses 10
  • 11. Space Systems Company Mission Success Joanne M. Maguire Executive Vice President Rickey L. Malone John C. Karas Julie A. Sattler Vice President Vice President & Vice President Mission Success General Manager Engineering Human Space Flight Insight Through Insight Through Program Mission Program SE and Chief Success Mangers Systems Engineer T. Cleon Lacefield CEV Vice President & Program Manager Independent Check and Balance 11
  • 12. “ The Savings From Acquisition Reform Were NotWorth the $11B in Mission Failures” . . . . Tom Young 12
  • 13. Going Beyond Mission Success• 100% Mission Success• Operational Excellence is Goal• Improved Effectiveness and Value• Delighting our Customer “We Never Forget Who We Are Working For.” 13
  • 14. Going Beyond Mission Success• Deliver as Promised on Path to 100% Mission Success• What does it Take? – Be Attentive to Customer – Exercise Sounds Judgment – Leverage Previous Experience• Adhering to Established Procedures While Being Alert to Value-Added Innovations “We Never Forget Who We Are Working For.” 14