Social media speaker series Part 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Social media speaker series Part 1

on

  • 1,598 views

Social media is not a replacement of previous forms of communication. Keep doing those things you used to do, social media is just another tool. The strength of social media is that it can empower ...

Social media is not a replacement of previous forms of communication. Keep doing those things you used to do, social media is just another tool. The strength of social media is that it can empower your audiences to participate in your communication and brand development….hopefully in a good way.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,598
Views on SlideShare
1,243
Embed Views
355

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

2 Embeds 355

http://www.naho.ca 349
http://paper.li 6

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • ASK FOR EXPERIENCE WITH SOCIAL MEDIA WHAT PEOPLE ARE HOPING TO GET OUT OF THIS WORKSHOP
  • Used to be one way communication. If you had a message, you had to go through certain channels: media, conferences/events, being out in the community, etc. You hope your message would be picked up and understood by your audiences. If they liked it, then you hoped they might pass it on. Now, we have social media. Social media is not a replacement of previous forms of communication. Keep doing those things you used to do, social media is just another tool. The strength of social media is that it can empower your audiences to participate in your communication and brand development….hopefully in a good way. But you can affect that. Because you’re relying on your audiences to communicate your messages, you’re giving up the control which you previously held. This can make some organizations uncomfortable as they think that their opening themselves up to criticism by entering into social media. The truth is they already are in social media. People are already talking about your organization, and by not participating, you have no influence over the discussion. Treat social media kind of like raising children. They have their own will, desires and interests. You can’t control them, but you can exact a certain amount of influence by being open, interesting and trusting their instincts. Empowerment and engagement are the names of the game.
  • Whatever you’re into, there’s an on-line community for it. Look for those communities that are interested in what you are and develop real relationships with individuals in them.
  • Social media works because it gives an equal voice to everyone. Previously, to be heard we had to be approved by our bosses, the media, etc. Now via Twitter, etc. people can listen to the opinions of anyone, and have their thoughts heard. Social media and mobile have made news spread instantly. At a recent Phillies/Mets baseball game, word of Osama bin Laden’s death spread throughout the stadium like wildfire via smart phones and cell phones, inspiring people to start chanting USA in the middle of the game. In the past they wouldn’t have known until they got home. Twitter also allows every day people to become the first to break a story. We used to hear about things as they happened from the media, now we’re hearing about it from each other as it happens. Social media also empowers every day people around us, like “Mommy bloggers”. This group has tremendous power to influence the thoughts (and buying choices) of their audiences and companies are taking notice.
  • Through tools like Twitter, anyone can be heard about anything. I sent out the tweets in green not expecting anything, and they we read by someone involved in the Laurier bike path redesign. People are listening. Companies are also listening. In order to maintain their reputations, companies are very active in brand management in social media. Whereas before a disgruntled customer could reach 20 people with their complaint, now they can reach thousands. By being involved in these conversations companies, organization and governments can do wonders for developing their brand.
  • Social media is not easy. You need buy in from your organization. You need to be able to monitor what’s going on in social media…for the long haul. You need to do it. Often people say, “Let’s create a Facebook page.” Great. Who’s going to do it? For it to work like it should time has to be put into content and engagement. You need to evaluate it. Is it working? How can you make it better? Who’s going do that?
  • Social media is just the next tool in communication. Letters, phones, etc. have all been ways to get people to talk to each other. This is just the next wave.
  • TIME = STAFF = MONEY
  • Not every organization should use social media. Not every organization should use every social media platform. Facebook might work, but Twitter might not. Create your social media strategy based on what service you provide, your communications goals and your audience.
  • At the end of the day, social media is a tool. It’s not an end to itself. Don’t just tweet or post or blog for the sake of doing it. Factor it into a larger communications strategy.
  • It’s not just the kids….
  • There’s a platform for everything.
  • Choose what works best for you.
  • Before you do anything in social media, listen. Listen to what people are talking about, how they’re using the platform, who’s saying what, are people talking about you, etc? It’s like going to a party: when you go to a party, you don’t just walk into the middle of the room and start talking about yourself. You walk around listening to conversations; if you find a group who are talking about something that you’re interested in or know something about, you hang out there and ease your way into the conversation. Once you’re in you don’t only talk about yourself, you ask questions, refer to things the group might be interested. Social media is real people interacting and that’s how any organization should participate in it.
  • Here are some websites that will help you find out what people are saying on various topics. Google Insights for Search tells you what people are searching for on Google. Twitter search, etc. help you find what people are tweeting about. Who’s saying what on what topic? There are also web sites that help you do the same for blogs. What are people writing about? Who’s writing on your areas of interest?
  • Blogs are very important. They: provide a face to the organization. Some groups will have the CEO blog, or one of the staff who has a specialized position. drive traffic to the web site. Some say the blog should be the focal point of your social media. refresh old content. For example, if you produced a publication on diabetes a year ago and it’s National Diabetes Awareness Day mentioning the publication in your blog will help people see it. help you appear to be an expert in your area of specialization. Writing about your area of expertise is a great way for people to see your name and to recognize you as being an authority. help improve your Google ranking. Blogs should be fairly brief and produced consistently. Don’t write three in a week, then go a month before writing another. They should also be written by people are experts in that area. A blog about maternal health is best written by someone knowledgeable in that field. You can also write for someone else’s blog or get guest bloggers for your blog. Great way of expanding your reach.
  • Twitter is very powerful. Books are written on the subject of Twitter alone. The person operating your Twitter account can have a higher profile than your CEO. Choose this person wisely. The basics: Tweet : 140 character statement that answers the question “What’s happening?” Retweet : forwarding to your followers something someone has tweeted. Follower : someone who has chosen to follow you. When you send out a tweet, these people will be able to see it. If someone isn’t following you, they won’t be able to see it (but there are ways). Following : To follow someone (have their tweets sent to your Twitter account), first, find the person. See the “Find People” tab? Go there and type in the person’s/company’s/organization’s name or Twitter name (if you know it). You’ll see a button that says “Follow”. Click that and you are now following them. You can also unfollow. Mention : if someone sends out a tweet with your Twitter address in it (eg. @trevoreggleton). How you see if people are talking about you or to you. Hashtag : the pound symbol placed before a word or acronym, eg. #aboriginal or #hcsm (health care social media). By putting a hashtag in a tweet you are putting your tweet into a stream of tweets using that same hashtag. This way everyone interested in #aboriginal can see your tweet. A great way of getting your message heard by non-followers and expanding your reach. Direct Message : a message sent from one person to another on Twitter that no one else can read. Links : links are a very big part of Twitter. Many tweets have a link to something else. Often the links don’t look like normal links (eg. http://ow.ly/81EAG) It has been shortened in a bit.ly, Tweetdeck, HootSuite or another similar web site. There are also sites like Yammer that are like Twitter, but operate within a closed group, like an organization or company. Maple Leaf Sports Entertainment Twitter philosophy: We follow back. We share. (content, news, stories) We try to answer everyone. We jump in conversations. We help fans update fans. We believe little things matter.
  • Facebook is a great platform for organizations wanting to develop a community. Facebook is like a personal club that you can choose who comes into and who doesn’t. By being friended or liked you’ve been let into someone’s personal club and this goes a long way to getting other people to listen to what you have to say. Use Facebook like people use it. It’s casual, fun and personable. Lots of pictures, questions, interaction, polls, etc. Provide value. You can create a fan page, which is like a web site on Facebook, that links your Facebook page to various pages on your web site. You can also develop groups. A group is something that is owned and controlled by the members whereas a Fan page is yours. This said, you can be the administrator of a group. Those who like your fan page can post their thoughts on it. Have an idea of how comfortable you are with that before you create a page.
  • Linked in is great for recruiting staff and volunteers.
  • People love video. It communicates with all people, regardless of age or education. Great way to create content. How-to videos are very popular. If you’re a community health clinic create a how-to series (how to take your blood pressure, warm up a baby bottle, etc.). Show people what your agency looks like. Provide a tour, meet some staff. It doesn’t have to high budget or fancy. Can also do video blogs. Click on the chart icon beside the 976 views and see statistics about who has been watching the video
  • Slide share is like YouTube, but for PowerPoint presentations. You can post PPTs that you haven’t given. If you want to explain something cheaply and simply, but it into a PowerPoint and upload it to SlideShare.
  • Wikis are great for developing content. Sometimes the wiki is created by one person, sometimes by dozens. The more people involved the more accurate it is.
  • Double the NAHO web site users use Facebook over Twitter, but more than double the site users follow us on Twitter than friend us on Facebook.
  • IT’S ALL PART OF WEB PRESENCE. WHEN YOU SEARCH FOR SOMETHING ON LINE, IT’S NOT JUST THE WEB SITE THAT APPEARS, IT’S EVERYTHING ON LINE CONNECTED TO THAT SEARCH: WEB SITE, BLOG, TWITTER, ETC. THE MORE YOU PUT OUT THERE THE GREATER YOUR WEB PRESENCE. 70% OF WEB SITE VISITS ARE FOR SPECIFIC TOPICS, I.E, PEOPLE LOOKING FOR THE SUBJECT RATHER THAN THE ORGANIZATION, SO THE MORE WE HAVE ON LINE ON A VARIETY OF TOPICS, THE BETTER POSITIONED WE ARE TO DRIVE TRAFFIC TO OUR WEB SITE, TWITTER FEED, FACEBOOK PAGE, ETC MULTIPLE STREAMS FOR MULTIPLE AUDIENCES: DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS, CEO, EXPERTS ON VARIOUS TOPICS
  • Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate. Everything can be evaluated: number of clicks, how long people stayed, views, comments, sentiment of comments, etc. Bit.ly (and others) does this for Twitter. YouTube and Facebook have their own metrics. With Facebook you get this info sent to you when you sign up for a Fan page.
  • Social media is very popular among Aboriginal people, especially in the north. There are numerous organizations groups doing a great job with it, and many Facebook groups.

Social media speaker series Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. NAHO Speaker Series Social Media Part 1 An Introduction Mark Buell & Trevor Eggleton December 15, 2011
  • 2. Today’s Agenda
    • Overview: What is social media?
    • Social media platforms.
    • How do I get started?
    • Strategy development.
    • Case Study
    • Other?
  • 3. Objectives
    • How to use social media wisely
    • Create communities of interest/champions.
    • Consistent messaging.
    • Other?
  • 4.  
  • 5. What is Social Media?
    • Broadly speaking, it’s:
    • Building communities.
    • Tapping into the potential of large groups of like-minded people.
    • Making the world smaller.
  • 6. This is what social media really is:
  • 7. 'There's a plane in the Hudson.  I'm on the ferry going to pick up the people.  Crazy.‘ - Janis Krums via Twitter
  • 8. A voice… Just broke my phone. Help me out, @telus. The #worstservice is @Telus stuck in a contract ! The future is not friendly #telus #telusstinks Kudos to Claire at the Metrotown @TELUS store. Fantastic service. Thanks! A thought about Laurier bike lane: it should be a bike lane from 6-9 am & 3-6 pm & parking rest of the time. #ottcity #ottawa @trevoreggleton How do you find the intersection treatments and signal timing along the route? @Hwy418 Pretty good, so long as you keep a decent speed. It's incentive. I like the green corridors at intersections. A reminder to cars.
  • 9.
    • Five Things Social Media is Not!
  • 10. 1. Easy
  • 11. 2. About Technology
  • 12. 3. Free
  • 13. 4. For Everyone.
  • 14. 5. This…
  • 15. Who uses Social Media?
  • 16. What are they Using?
  • 17.  
  • 18. Some Key Social Platforms
  • 19. Listening
    • Free and $$$ tools.
  • 20. What are people talking about on-line? Google Insights for Search What are people talking about on Twitter? Twitter search Twitter realtime Twitscoop Hashtags.org On Blogs? Google blogs Blog pulse Technocrati
  • 21. Blogs or Somebody else’s Your own
  • 22. Micro-blogging
  • 23. Social Networking
  • 24. Social Networking
  • 25. Video Sharing
  • 26. SlideShare
  • 27. Wikis
  • 28. What to use when?
  • 29.  
  • 30. Web Presence
  • 31. Evaluation
  • 32. Evaluation
  • 33. Welcome to your world
    • Not just the teens
    • Not just the “geeks”
    • Not just the Net generation
    • Not just the summer student
    • Not just the Communications Officer
  • 34. Who are Aboriginal Peoples?
    • 48 per cent of the FN/I/M population is aged 24 and under compared to 31 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population.
    • Half of the: >Inuit population is 22 & younger >First Nations population is 25 & younger >Métis population is 30 & younger
  • 35. What is could be…
    • Volunteer engagement.
    • Awareness raising.
    • Public education .
    • Fundraising.
    • Other? (a specific project?)
  • 36. And have fun with it!
    • Thank you.
    • Mark E. Buell Trevor Eggleton
    • E-mail: mark.buell@cira.ca E-mail: teggleton@naho.ca
    • Twitter: @mebuell Twitter: @trevoreggleton